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English Language Learners: The BIG Picture Presented by: Marisol Jimenez M.Ed., J.D. ELL/ Migrant Coordinator Northwest Regional Education Service District.

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Presentation on theme: "English Language Learners: The BIG Picture Presented by: Marisol Jimenez M.Ed., J.D. ELL/ Migrant Coordinator Northwest Regional Education Service District."— Presentation transcript:

1 English Language Learners: The BIG Picture Presented by: Marisol Jimenez M.Ed., J.D. ELL/ Migrant Coordinator Northwest Regional Education Service District (503)

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4 Regional ELL Counts By County Clatsop 217 Columbia 80 Tillamook 382 Washington 10,513 (Region) Total 11,192 *Based on State Count

5 Scappoose SD Current estimate: 12 Current estimate: 12 Projections: Projections: By April 2007 Migrant Housing Complex construction will be completed. Migrant Students expected to enter the Scappoose School District maximum of 97

6 OREGON MANDATES Districts have a Dual Obligation to their English Learner students to: Develop Academic English Language Proficiency. Develop Academic English Language Proficiency. Provide meaningful access to grade-level academic content via appropriate instruction. Provide meaningful access to grade-level academic content via appropriate instruction.

7 Dual Purpose Language - Learn English Language - Learn English Access to Content - Making content comprehensible Access to Content - Making content comprehensible What does this mean for teachers? What does this mean for teachers?

8 LANGUAGE English Language Development (ELD) English Language Development (ELD) Minimum of 30 minutes per day “English as a Foreign Language” ELD is not Language Arts or Content

9 CONTENT All Teachers are responsible for teaching English Language Learners CONTENT All Teachers are responsible for teaching English Language Learners CONTENT HOW? HOW?

10 DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION Good Teaching for ALL Students Guided Language Acquisition Design (G.L.A.D.) Guided Language Acquisition Design (G.L.A.D.) Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (S.I.O.P.) Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (S.I.O.P.) Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) Others Others

11 English language learners have to acquire two kinds of English in order to be successful in the school environment. English language learners have to acquire two kinds of English in order to be successful in the school environment. !Social English is the language of everyday conversations and interactions with peers, teachers and school personnel. !Academic English is the language used for instruction in the classroom, the language found in textbooks and the language used in developing higher-order thinking skills. Adapted from IDRA, Intercultural Development Research Association © 2000 – adapted from Jim Cummins Two Kinds of English Northwest Regional Education Service District

12 Social Language Informal Informal Predominantly oral Predominantly oral 3000 words or less 3000 words or less Short, simple sentence structures Short, simple sentence structures Acquired within six months to two years Acquired within six months to two years Social English is acquired within a relatively short period of time, usually six months to two years and involves listening, comprehension and speaking skills. The ability to function socially in English is dependent upon the student's developmental age, personality, willingness to take risks, experience with other children whose primary language is English, and his or her cultural mores. Adapted from IDRA, Intercultural Development Research Association © 2000 Northwest Regional Education Service District

13 Academic Language Formal Formal Cognitively complex Cognitively complex Predominantly written Predominantly written 100,000s of words 100,000s of words Long, complex sentence structures Long, complex sentence structures Takes five to seven years to master Takes five to seven years to master Acquiring academic English is more complex because it requires mastery of all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the content areas that schools teach and test. It can take five to seven years to master academic English. The amount of time required also depends upon the degree of literacy the student has achieved in his or her first language, the approach the school uses to develop English literacy skills and the student's facility and ease in acquiring and learning language. Adapted from IDRA, Intercultural Development Research Association © 2000 Northwest Regional Education Service District

14 Students who have developed literacy in their primary language will transfer that knowledge into English quicker than students who are having to learn both a new language and a new concept at the same time. English language learners can be grouped into three categories within the levels of English proficiency: Beginning/Early Intermediate Beginning/Early Intermediate Intermediate Intermediate Early Advanced/Advanced Early Advanced/Advanced Adapted from IDRA, Intercultural Development Research Association © 2000 Northwest Regional Education Service District Native Language and ELP levels

15 Proficiency Levels of ELLs ! Point ! Draw ! Match ! Select ! Circle ! State ! Choose ! Act Out ! Label ! Name ! List “I have little or no English proficiency.” Beginner Students Can: However, beginner students quickly connect the concepts they know in their primary language to the new English language environment, and they can participate in the classroom by doing the activities listed here. Beginners may demonstrate various levels of oral and literacy skills in their primary language. Beginner students are those with little or no English proficiency. The English sound system is new to them, and they comprehend little of what is said in English. They may go through a "silent period" where they attempt to make no English sounds. Adapted from IDRA, Intercultural Development Research Association © 2000 Northwest Regional Education Service District

16 Proficiency Levels of ELLs !Recall !Retell !Define !Describe !Compare !Contrast !Summarize !Restate “I have good oral skills in English, but minimal reading and composition skills in English.” Intermediate Students Can: Intermediate level students have good oral skills in English but have minimal reading and composition skills in English. They may be able to converse at length and to comprehend anything said to them, however reading and writing at grade-level in English is difficult. Some intermediate students may be literate at or above grade-level in their primary language. Literate students quickly transfer reading and writing skills into English and are able to perform the activities listed here. Adapted from IDRA, Intercultural Development Research Association © 2000 Northwest Regional Education Service District

17 Proficiency Levels of ELLs !Analyze !Create !Defend !Debate !Evaluate !Justify !Support !Explain Advanced “I am fluent in oral English and have some reading and writing skills, but need help to pass tests.” Students Can: Advanced students have difficulty taking standardized and norm-referenced tests because of the higher-order thinking skills required. Some advanced students may by fully literate in their primary language while others may have only limited literacy skills in their home language. In order for advanced students to become proficient in English, they need experiences that involve the following skills listed here. Advanced students are those who are nearly proficient in English. They understand and speak English fluently but have difficulty reading and writing English. Adapted from IDRA, Intercultural Development Research Association © 2000 Northwest Regional Education Service District

18 Second Language Acquisition Strategies and Activities u All levels of ELLs benefit from: !Cooperative grouping activities !Visual aids !Manipulative and hands-on activities !Concrete to abstract presentations Beginning/ Early Intermediate Intermediate Early Advanced/ Advanced All students learn when the information is comprehensible. English language learners require second language acquisition strategies and activities that make the language and information comprehensible. Adapted from IDRA, Intercultural Development Research Association © 2000 Northwest Regional Education Service District

19 Consortium Membership Benefits SSD Teachers get professional development opportunities: SSD Teachers get professional development opportunities: GLAD Summer School Basic SIOP and SIOP Network ELD for teachers of EL’s PSU Credits PSU Credits ESOL Endorsement (land and online) ESOL Endorsement (land and online) Conferences Conferences


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