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Electrostatics A PowerPoint Presentation by Paul E. Tippens, Professor of Physics Southern Polytechnic State University © 2007.

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Presentation on theme: "Electrostatics A PowerPoint Presentation by Paul E. Tippens, Professor of Physics Southern Polytechnic State University © 2007."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Electrostatics A PowerPoint Presentation by Paul E. Tippens, Professor of Physics Southern Polytechnic State University © 2007

3 Objectives: After finishing this unit, you should be able to: Explain and demonstrate the first law of electro- statics and discuss charging by contact and by induction.Explain and demonstrate the first law of electro- statics and discuss charging by contact and by induction. Understand Coulomb’s Law and its symmetry with gravityUnderstand Coulomb’s Law and its symmetry with gravity Define the electron and coulomb as units of electric charge.Define the electron and coulomb as units of electric charge.

4 Electric Charge When a rubber rod is rubbed against fur, electrons are removed from the fur and deposited on the rod. The rod is said to be negatively charged because of an excess of electrons. The fur is said to be positively charged because of a deficiency of electrons. Electrons move from fur to the rubber rod. positive negative

5 Glass and Silk When a glass rod is rubbed against silk, electrons are removed from the glass and deposited on the silk. The glass is said to be positively charged because of a deficiency of electrons. The silk is said to be negatively charged because of a excess of electrons. Electrons move from glass to the silk cloth. positive negative silk glass

6 The Electroscope Pith-ball Electroscope Gold-leaf Electroscope Laboratory devices used to study the existence of two kinds of electric charge.

7 Two Negative Charges Repel 1. Charge the rubber rod by rubbing against fur. 2. Transfer electrons from rod to each pith ball. The two negative charges repel each other.

8 Two Positive Charges Repel 1. Charge the glass rod by rubbing against silk. 2. Touch balls with rod. Free electrons on the balls move to fill vacancies on the cloth, leaving each of the balls with a deficiency. (Positively charged.) The two positive charges repel each other.

9 The Two Types of Charge fur Rubber Attraction Note that the negatively charged (green) ball is attracted to the positively charged (red) ball. Opposite Charges Attract! silk glass

10 The First Law of Electrostatics Like charges repel; unlike charges attract. Neg PosNeg Pos

11 Charging by Contact 1. Take an uncharged electroscope as shown below. 2. Bring a negatively charged rod into contact with knob. 3. Electrons move down on leaf and shaft, causing them to separate. When the rod is removed, the scope remains negatively charged

12 Charging Electroscope Positively by Contact with a Glass Rod: Repeat procedures by using a positively charged glass rod. Electrons move from the ball to fill deficiency on glass, leaving the scope with a net positive charge when glass is removed.

13 Charging Spheres by Induction Uncharged Spheres Separation of Charge Isolation of SpheresCharged by Induction Induction Electrons Repelled

14 Induction for a Single Sphere Uncharged SphereSeparation of Charge Electrons move to ground. Charged by Induction Induction

15 The Quantity of Charge The quantity of charge (q) can be defined in terms of the number of electrons, but the Coulomb (C) is a better unit for later work. A temporary definition might be as given below: The Coulomb: 1 C = 6.25 x electrons Which means that the charge on a single electron is: 1 electron: e - = -1.6 x C

16 Coulomb’s Law The force of attraction or repulsion between two point charges is directly proportional to the product of the two charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. F r F F q q q’q’ q’q’ -+ --

17 COULOMB’S LAW The force between two charged objects is directly proportional to the product of their charges and inversely proportional to their separation distance squared. link1link1, link2, link3, link4, link4link2link3link4

18 In equation form: F  F is the force of attraction, measured in NEWTONS, between charges q 1 and q 2 k k is the Universal Electrostatic Constant, equal to 9.00 x 10 9 N m 2 /coul 2 q1q1 q2q2 q 1 and q 2 are the attracting charges, measured in Coulombs d2d2 d is the distance between the charges, and is measured in METERS

19 Electric Fields An electric field exists in a region if space if a charge placed in that region experiences an electric force. The magnitude of an electric field at any given point is defined to be the ratio of the force on a charge at that point to the amount of charge. E = F/Q Electric field strength has units of Newtons/Coulomb (N/C).

20 Properties of Space E Electric Field Q. r An electric field is a property of space allowing prediction of the force on a charge at that point. The field E exist independently of the charge q and is found from: E is a Vector

21 The direction of the electric field at any point is defined to be the same direction as the direction of force on a positive test charge placed in the region at that point. Field lines point away from positive and toward negative charges.

22 CONCLUSION: Static Electricity


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