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Day 2 Electrical Charging & Coulomb’s Law. Objectives Charging by Conduction Charging by Induction Electroscopes Coulomb’s Law.

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Presentation on theme: "Day 2 Electrical Charging & Coulomb’s Law. Objectives Charging by Conduction Charging by Induction Electroscopes Coulomb’s Law."— Presentation transcript:

1 Day 2 Electrical Charging & Coulomb’s Law

2 Objectives Charging by Conduction Charging by Induction Electroscopes Coulomb’s Law

3 Charging by Conduction When a charged metallic object is brought in contact with a neutral metallic object, it acquires some of the charge.

4 Charging by Induction If a negatively charged object is brought close to a neutral metal rod that is grounded on one end, the positive charges in the neutral rod will be attracted to the negative charges on the object The negative charges on the neutral object will be attracted to ground

5 Nonconductors won’t become charged by conduction or induction, but will experience charge separation Polarization of Charge in an Insulator

6 The electroscope is a device used for detecting electric charge. The Electroscope

7 The electroscope can be charged either by Induction or conduction, respectively. Charging of the Electroscope In either case, the leaves will repel each other

8 The charged electroscope can then be used to determine the sign of an unknown charge. The greater amount of charge deposited on the leaves, the greater the separation

9 Experiment shows that the electric force between two charges is proportional to the product of the charges and inversely proportional to the distance between them. Coulomb’s Law

10 Electrostatic Force : +Q 1 +Q 2 r

11 Coulomb’s Law: This equation gives the magnitude of the electrostatic force between two point charges. Coulomb’s Law

12 The force acts along the radial line connecting the charges Unlike charges attract each other Like charges repel each other

13 Unit of charge: coulomb, C. The proportionality constant in Coulomb’s law is then: k = x 10 9 N·m 2 /C 2. Charges produced by rubbing are typically around a micro-Coulomb: 1 μC = C. Coulomb’s Law

14 Charge on the electron: e = x C. Electric charge is quantized in units of the electron charge. Coulomb’s Law Q = n · e

15 The Coulombic constant k, can also be written in terms of ε 0, the permittivity of free space: Coulomb’s Law

16 Conceptual Example 21-1: Which charge exerts the greater force? Two positive point charges, Q 1 = 50 μC and Q 2 = 1 μC, are separated by a distance. Which is larger in magnitude, the force that Q 1 exerts on Q 2 or the force that Q 2 exerts on Q 1 ?

17 Coulomb’s Law Example 21-2: Three charges in a line. Three charged particles are arranged in a line, as shown. Calculate the net electrostatic force on particle 3 (the -4.0 μC on the right) due to the other two charges.

18 Coulomb’s Law Example 21-3: Electric force using vector components. Calculate the net electrostatic force on charge Q 3 shown in the figure due to the charges Q 1 and Q 2.


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