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Sebastian Oddone District Supervisor Summer PD June 2012 Quarter 3 Presenters Mercy Aycart Jill Bartley Maggie Gonzalez Yoly McCarthy.

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Presentation on theme: "Sebastian Oddone District Supervisor Summer PD June 2012 Quarter 3 Presenters Mercy Aycart Jill Bartley Maggie Gonzalez Yoly McCarthy."— Presentation transcript:

1 Sebastian Oddone District Supervisor Summer PD June 2012 Quarter 3 Presenters Mercy Aycart Jill Bartley Maggie Gonzalez Yoly McCarthy

2 We are all learners today working towards same goals We share discussion time We are respectful of each other We turn off all electronic devices Place all comments in parking lot It’s all about us!

3 XIX Cells Review cell theory and discovery Review cell structure Review cell organelles: their roles and functions Cell transport UNIT: REPRODUCTION (How do we grow?) What kind of engaging activities do you include with these topics? Cell Model ProjectCell Model Project (HSL) Diffusion and OsmosisDiffusion and Osmosis (HSL)

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5 Relate structure to function for the components of plant and animal cells. Explain the role of cell membranes as a highly selective barrier (passive and active transport). SC.912.L.14.2 To compare and/or contrast the structures found in plant cells and in animal cells. To compare and/or contrast the structures found in prokaryotic cells and in eukaryotic cells.t to describe how structures in cells are directly related to their function in the cell. To explain the role of the cell membrane during active and passive transport. WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

6 Items will not address protists or fungi or assess cellular structures unique to protists or fungi. Items referring to prokaryotic structures are limited to the cell wall, cell membrane (plasma membrane), cytoplasm, plasmid, ribosomes, and flagella. Items referring to eukaryotic structures are limited to the cell wall, cell membrane (plasma membrane), cytoplasm, nucleus, nuclear envelope, nucleolus, chromatin, ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, microtubules, microfilaments, vacuoles, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, chloroplasts, lysosomes, cilia, and flagella. Items referring to the role of the cell membrane may address hypotonic, hypertonic, and/or isotonic solutions; however, the assessment should be on processes and not terminology. CONTENT LIMITS

7 CAN YOU EXPLAIN WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU GET ‘WRINKLED’ FINGERS?

8 A shipwrecked sailor is stranded on a small desert island with no fresh water to drink. He knows he could last without food for up to a month, but if he didn't have water to drink he would be dead within a week. Hoping to postpone the inevitable, his thirst drove him to drink the salty seawater. He was dead in two days.

9 Why do you think drinking seawater killed the sailor faster than not drinking any water at all? ?

10 To determine the cause of the sailor's death, we will determine the effects of salt water on slices of potato. Our assumption is that potato cells will behave like the sailor's cells in his body. - Include quantitative measurements (What are the major differences between a potato cell and a sailor cell?) How does salt water concentration change the length and mass of potato slices?

11 Essential Questions What are the most important concepts that you want your students to learn in a particular topic, lesson, unit? What Criteria Is Used When formulating Essential Questions?

12 What is the role of the cell membrane during active and passive transport? How do cells react to if subject to a hypertonic salt water or sugar water solution? Sample Questions

13 Elicit Prior Knowledge What do you know about a potato? How do substances move into and out of a cell? Does this movement happen by itself or does it require energy? What causes this movement to stop? Would the movement of a solvent across a membrane happen in the same way that movement of a solute across a membrane does? Osmosis

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15 Objective: Problem Statement: Hypothesis: Variables: Independent- Dependent- Controlled- Control: Procedures: Follow the scientific method as you proceed What data will be collected? Where will you record your data? Explain your results. How do your results relate to the original problem?

16 WHAT WILL YOU DO? Make a plan. Think clearly about what you are testing. What will your control be? Think about why you are doing each step. Think about how things compare to one another. Anticipate what meanings potential outcomes would have.

17 SampleInitial mass Final mass Change in mass Change in Length Turgidity (crisp/flaccid) 20% salt 10% salt Fresh water Other SAMPLE

18 Water Sodium chloride solution Sucrose solution Potatoes Aluminum foil Plastic wrap Lugol’s Solution Starch Beakers Graduated cylinders Toothpicks Balances Rulers Razors Baggies Food coloring Cups SUPPLIESAVAILABLE

19 Was it important to eep the potato cores the same size? keep the potato cores the same size? Cover each beaker with aluminum foil? Cover each beaker with aluminum foil? Into which potato core did water flow? From which potato core did water flow?

20 1.Describe the function of the cell membrane. 2.Discuss how cell membranes are like a filter or gatekeeper. 3.Why is such a function necessary for a cell to function? 4.Define “selectively permeable.” Hint: dissect the word parts and then explain its meaning)

21 Include the following in your conclusion: Describe the changes observed in potato slices? Is diffusion or osmosis responsible for the changes? Explain. Can you determine if Active or Passive Transport occurred? Explain. Explain which solution is isotonic, hypertonic, and hypotonic. How do you know? Sea water is 35% salt. Why did the sailor die more quickly drinking sea water than fresh water? What do you think killed him?

22 SC.912.L.14.2 Relate structure to function for the components of plant and animals cells. Explain the role of cell membranes as a highly selective barrier (passive and active transport). SC.912.L.14.3 Compare and contrast the general structures of plant and animals cells. Compare and contrast the general structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. AA Diffusion and Osmosis Look at the Item Specs and Pacing guide. Determine what changes, if any, you would make to ensure coverage of the concept. B.C.: Students will explain the role of the cell membrane during active and passive transport. C.L.: Items referring to the role of the cell membrane may address hypotonic, hypertonic, and/or isotonic solutions; however, the assessment should be on processes and not terminology.

23 Activity 1: What is the movement of material through a semi-permeable membrane? Activity 2: What is the osmotic effect of varying sodium chloride and sucrose solutions on the physical characteristics of a potato core? Hot Lab Review the HOT Lab. Determine what changes, if any, that you would make.

24 Explain what you tested and what you found out. Which solutions (if any) were hypertonic, isotonic, or hypotonic? Explain how you know! After reviewing the Item Specs, what changes would you make? After reviewing the pacing guide, what comments do you have? media.discoveryeducation.com/videos/dsc/externalapp lications/accessible/simulations/Diffusion/index.html In your 5-10 min presentation, at minimum, discuss these points

25 UNIT: GENETICS (How do we become different?) XXII. Heredity - Mendelian Genetics Work of Gregor Mendell Mendel’s principles Other patterns Human traits Genes and variation XXIII. Biotechnology Impact on society, individual, and environment Medical and ethical issues

26 Can Science Help Us Identify the Generous Bandit?

27 * how to use Mendel's laws of segregation and independent assortment to analyze patterns of inheritance. * know how dominant, recessive, codominant, sex- linked, polygenic, and multiple allele modes of inheritance cause observed inheritance patterns. * understand how biotechnology impacts individuals, society, and/or the environment. Given scenarios with specific examples be able to determine the impact. L.16.1 Heredity and L Biotechnology

28 Objective: Determine the identity of the Mystery Donor Snapshot of Procedure 1.Read the Summary of Evidence Report 2.Determine genotype of hand print left at the courthouse by completing the ‘Differences in Similar Phenotypes’ HOT Lab. 3.Read ‘The Genetics of Eye Color’ article to determine the probable eye color of mystery donor. 4.‘Can Chromosomal Abnormalities Be Observed?’ – Making Karyotypes HOT lab (look at Figures 1, 4 and 5) 5.Then complete the karyotype analysis of the mystery donor and compare to the provided karyotypes. 6.Identify the donor with explanation on how you came to your conclusion.

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30 Differences in Similar Phenotypes Background: Humans are classified as a separate species because of all the special characteristics that they possess. These characteristics are controlled by strands of DNA located deep inside their cells. This DNA contains the code for every protein that an organism has the ability to produce. These proteins combine with other chemicals within the body to produce the cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and finally the organism itself. The appearance of these organs, such as the shape of one’s nose, length of the fingers, or the color of the eyes is called the phenotype. Even though humans contain hands with five fingers, two ears, or one nose, there are subtle differences that separate these organs from one another. There are subtle differences in a person’s genes that allows for these different phenotypes. In this lab, we are going to observe some of these differences in phenotype and try to determine why they happened. Problem Statement: Do all human hands measure the same? Vocabulary: alleles, dominant, genotype, homozygous, heterozygous (hybrid), phenotype, recessive

31 The Genetics of Eye Color Mendelian Genetics

32 Making Karyotypes (Adapted from: Prentice Hall, Lab Manual A) Background: Several human genetic disorders are caused by extra, missing, or damaged chromosomes. In order to study these disorders, cells from a person are grown with a chemical that stops cell division at the metaphase stage. During metaphase, a chromosome exists as two chromatids attached at the centromere. The cells are stained to reveal banding patterns and placed on glass slides. The chromosomes are observed under the microscope, where they are counted, checked for abnormalities, and photographed. The photograph is then enlarged, and the images of the chromosomes are individually cut out. The chromosomes are identified and arranged in homologous pairs. The arrangement of homologous pairs is called a karyotype. In this investigation, you will use a sketch of chromosomes to make a karyotype. You will also examine the karyotype to determine the presence of any chromosomal abnormalities. Problem Statement: Can chromosomal abnormalities be observed? Vocabulary: centromere, chromosomes, chromatids, genes, homologous pairs, karyotype, mutations, Trisomy 21- Down syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, Turner syndrome

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34 Student Exploration: Human Karyotyping Vocabulary: autosome, chromosomal disorder, chromosome, karyotype, sex chromosome Prior Knowledge Question (Do this BEFORE using the Gizmo.) A chromosome is a rod-shaped structure made of coils of DNA. Most human cells have 23 pairs of chromosomes. Why do you think humans have two sets of 23 chromosomes? (Hint: Where did each set come from?) _______________________________________________________________ How do you think different people’s chromosomes would compare? _____________________________________________________________________

35 Incomplete Karyotype Analysis – provided by the Forensics Dept. Long Island, New York

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37 * SC.912.L Evaluate the impact of biotechnology on the individual, society and the environment, including medical and ethical issues. AA * SC.912.L.16.1 Use Mendel’s Laws of Segregation and Independent Assortment to analyze patterns of inheritance. AA * SC.912.L.16.2 Discuss observed inheritance patterns caused by various modes of inheritance, including dominant, recessive, co-dominant, sex- linked, polygenic, and multiple alleles. L16.1 Review Questions

38 Item Specifications

39 Questions? Exit Slip Thank you!


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