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Is a Ton of Material Worth a Ton of Work? Stephanie Boyd, Williams College, Charley Stevenson, Integrated Eco Strategy,

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Presentation on theme: "Is a Ton of Material Worth a Ton of Work? Stephanie Boyd, Williams College, Charley Stevenson, Integrated Eco Strategy,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Is a Ton of Material Worth a Ton of Work? Stephanie Boyd, Williams College, Charley Stevenson, Integrated Eco Strategy,

2 Overview of project Three scenarios Methodology Analysis of findings Financial analysis Transportation impact Lessons learned Agenda

3 Kellogg – Originally the President’s House and currently one of the oldest structures (1794) on campus

4 Before…

5 Deconstruction…

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7 Moving Kellogg… Video of Kellogg House Move

8 Landfill Energy recovery Recycling Reuse Source reduction Waste hierarchy Avoid for LEED 100% Diversion LBC Avoid for LEED Perform for LEED

9 FOUNDATION REMOVED and RECYCLED BASE CASE (Theoretical) BASE CASE (Theoretical) ACTUAL STORY MAXIMUM REUSE- RECYCLE (Theoretical) MAXIMUM REUSE- RECYCLE (Theoretical) MOST Material Landfilled SOME Material Landfilled Some Relocation SOME Material Landfilled Some Relocation Most Material NOT Landfilled Some Relocation Most Material NOT Landfilled Some Relocation Scenarios we considered…

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12 EPA’s: WAste Reduction Model

13 Range of Emissions Impact by Material Source: METALS

14 Base Case Metals and concrete recycled Other materials landfilled

15 Weight Processing/ Transport Emissions Reuse Emissions Recycle Emissions Combustion Emissions Landfill Emissions Material TonsTonnes Aluminum (recycled) Fiberglass (reused) Other0.39 Copper (recycled) Glass (reused) Wood Flooring (reused) Carpet (recycled, reused) Asphalt Shingles (recycled) Drywall (recycled) Steel (reused, recycled) Scrap Wood (landfill) Mixed C&D (landfill) Clean Wood (reused, recycled) Concrete (recycled) Total The Actual Story Higher reuse Higher recycling Some landfill

16 By weight, most material was recycled. Significant portion of non-foundation materials was landfilled.

17 WeightDisposal Emissions Reuse Emissions Recycle Emissions Combustion Emissions Landfill Emissions Maximize Reuse Recycling Assumptions MaterialTonsTonnes Aluminum Fiberglass Insulation Other Copper Glass Wood Flooring Carpet % reused, compared to 46% Asphalt Shingles % reused, rather than recycled Drywall Steel Medium Density Fiberboard/Scrap Wood % recycled rather than combusted, landfilled Mixed Construction and DemolitionDebris % recycled rather than landfilled Dimensional Lumber/Clean Wood % recycled rather than reused Concrete Total Maximum Reuse and Recycling

18 Emissions Savings by Scenario

19 Most emissions benefit due to wood Concrete – lot of weight, small benefit. ….and metals.

20 CostsDemolitionActualMaximum Foundation $ Deconstruction/Demolition $ $ Total $ $ Cost per tonne emissions $ $ -889 Cost per ton of material $ 56 $ 186 Financial Analysis

21 How far should you drive? Example: 130 miles to Boston

22 Reuse or recycle as much of the wood as possible Concrete has minimal impact on emissions Are we measuring/evaluating the right things? Transportation not as important as we thought! Planning, planning, planning Lessons Learned

23 Stephanie Boyd Director Zilkha Center for Environmental Initiatives Williams College Charley Stevenson Integrated Eco Strategy Williamstown, MA Stephanie Boyd Director Zilkha Center for Environmental Initiatives Williams College Charley Stevenson Integrated Eco Strategy Williamstown, MA QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS


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