Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

CHAPTER 10 – FAMILY LIFE CYCLE Instructor: Wendy Crapo.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "CHAPTER 10 – FAMILY LIFE CYCLE Instructor: Wendy Crapo."— Presentation transcript:

1 CHAPTER 10 – FAMILY LIFE CYCLE Instructor: Wendy Crapo

2 Used by permission of THE ACADEMY OF NURSING 2355 E S. S.L.C., UT

3 FAMILY LIFE CYLCE

4 BEGINNING MARRIAGES What general age is best? Youthful marriages20-25 Youthful marriages Up to age 25, the older you are at marriage the greater likelihood of marital happiness.Up to age 25, the older you are at marriage the greater likelihood of marital happiness. Teens have higher divorceTeens have higher divorce After age 30 higher divorcesAfter age 30 higher divorces PREDICTION OF SUCCESS: Until death do us part: Not a fact for most marriages.

5 Prediction of Success Education = income, insight, statusEducation = income, insight, status Length of engagementLength of engagement Childhood environment & relationship with family of origin & attachment.Childhood environment & relationship with family of origin & attachment. Divorced parents may cause a shying away from marriage.Divorced parents may cause a shying away from marriage. Loving each other did not have affect on whether or not they fought.Loving each other did not have affect on whether or not they fought. HONEYMOON EFFECT: Overlooking problemsHONEYMOON EFFECT: Overlooking problems

6 PREDICTION OF SUCCESS FACTORS Communicate wellCommunicate well Resolve conflict in a constructive wayResolve conflict in a constructive way Realistic expectations of marriageRealistic expectations of marriage Like each other as people (opposites attract doesn ’ t work)Like each other as people (opposites attract doesn ’ t work) Undesirable traits are magnified in marriageUndesirable traits are magnified in marriage Agree on religion & ethical issuesAgree on religion & ethical issues Balance leisure activities with each otherBalance leisure activities with each other

7 ENGAGEMENT (More of a ritual than a binding commitment) How long should engagement be? The longer you are engaged the more likely you are to discover compatibilities.The longer you are engaged the more likely you are to discover compatibilities. But it can go too long too.But it can go too long too. 24% are pregnant when marry.24% are pregnant when marry. Purpose of engagement Commitment to marry (try out how it feels).Commitment to marry (try out how it feels). Think about realities of married life.Think about realities of married life. Beginning of kinship (start making ties with in-laws).Beginning of kinship (start making ties with in-laws). Become a couple.Become a couple.

8 Feelings during engagement AnxietyAnxiety Maturation & dependencyMaturation & dependency LossesLosses Question partner choiceQuestion partner choice Gender role conflictGender role conflict Idealization & disillusionmentIdealization & disillusionment Get to know self (weaknesses & strengths)Get to know self (weaknesses & strengths)

9 WEDDING RITUAL (65% church weddings) Symbolized profound life transition & step into adulthoodSymbolized profound life transition & step into adulthood Give the bride away (when father received pledge of money he gave bride away)Give the bride away (when father received pledge of money he gave bride away) Exchange of rings (From Egypt = timelessness & to give it back is symbolic gesture)Exchange of rings (From Egypt = timelessness & to give it back is symbolic gesture) Not wearing a ring is symbolic statement about the marriageNot wearing a ring is symbolic statement about the marriage Carrying bride over threshold (Greece & Rome symbolic of abduction because bride would not willingly leave her father ’ s house)Carrying bride over threshold (Greece & Rome symbolic of abduction because bride would not willingly leave her father ’ s house) Eating of cake (offering made to household ofEating of cake (offering made to household of God ’ s & made union sacred) Jumping the broomstick (African tradition)Jumping the broomstick (African tradition) Honeymoon (Pagan time of intoxicationHoneymoon (Pagan time of intoxication to insure fertility) Flower girls (carried wheat to symbolize fertility)Flower girls (carried wheat to symbolize fertility) In groups brainstorm all expenses for a wedding and estimate the cost.

10 HONEYMOON HONEYMOON PURPOSES Rest and RecreationRest and Recreation Time for being aloneTime for being alone Initial adjustment to marriageInitial adjustment to marriage GUIDELINES WHEN PLANNING A HONEYMOON Don ’ t go into debtDon ’ t go into debt May delay to a better timeMay delay to a better time Honeymoon not necessary for a happy marriageHoneymoon not necessary for a happy marriage NATIONAL SURVEYS SHOW: 50% of couples interviewed report their honeymoon was not happy at all.50% of couples interviewed report their honeymoon was not happy at all. People most unhappy with honeymoons are young women who have always lived at home.People most unhappy with honeymoons are young women who have always lived at home.

11 ENDURING MARRIAGES Couples who are happily in love.Couples who are happily in love. Unhappy couples who continue marriage out of habit and fear.Unhappy couples who continue marriage out of habit and fear. Couples in between who are neither happy nor unhappy and accept the situation.Couples in between who are neither happy nor unhappy and accept the situation. 20% were happy and 20% were unhappy.20% were happy and 20% were unhappy. Little correlation between happy marriages and stable ones.Little correlation between happy marriages and stable ones. In general, however, the quality of the marital relationship appears to show continuity over the years.In general, however, the quality of the marital relationship appears to show continuity over the years.

12 HAPPILY MARRIED – What ’ s the Secret? When they met they felt immediately at home with each other. Early on there is a strong physical and/or emotional attraction – they feel a sweeping sense of connection.When they met they felt immediately at home with each other. Early on there is a strong physical and/or emotional attraction – they feel a sweeping sense of connection. Happy couples often experience themselves as being the same and different. Similar backgrounds but each wants to embrace the other ’ s differentness; each wanted to be more like the other.Happy couples often experience themselves as being the same and different. Similar backgrounds but each wants to embrace the other ’ s differentness; each wanted to be more like the other. Happy couples establish and follow daily routines. This promotes confidence and trust.Happy couples establish and follow daily routines. This promotes confidence and trust. Happy couples usually describe their mate as their best friend. They like each other very much, above all others. They spent a lot of time together.Happy couples usually describe their mate as their best friend. They like each other very much, above all others. They spent a lot of time together. Happy couples share a life dream. They work together to make the dream come true.Happy couples share a life dream. They work together to make the dream come true.

13 HAPPILY MARRIED cont. Happy couples don ’ t hold a grudge. High capacity to resolve conflict and move on.Happy couples don ’ t hold a grudge. High capacity to resolve conflict and move on. Happy couples expect each other to do their best. They believe in their partner.Happy couples expect each other to do their best. They believe in their partner. Happy couples roll with the changes. People do change and good marriages change for their partner and for the better.Happy couples roll with the changes. People do change and good marriages change for their partner and for the better. Happy couples agree to have or not to have children. They usually share a dream of creating a family.Happy couples agree to have or not to have children. They usually share a dream of creating a family. Happy couples understand the importance of sex & romance. Friendship was more important than sex but sex was the strong force binding them together through the years.Happy couples understand the importance of sex & romance. Friendship was more important than sex but sex was the strong force binding them together through the years.

14 HAPPILY MARRIED cont. Happy couples see each other ’ s best self. They see each other clearly as they are but also what they can become.Happy couples see each other ’ s best self. They see each other clearly as they are but also what they can become. Happy couples strongly believe in and practice monogamy. Fidelity was simply expected and an open marriage was not appealing to happily married couples.Happy couples strongly believe in and practice monogamy. Fidelity was simply expected and an open marriage was not appealing to happily married couples. Happily married couples share a complete absence of power struggle. Considered each other to be equal and their money, especially, was always “ theirs ”, not ‘ mine ”.Happily married couples share a complete absence of power struggle. Considered each other to be equal and their money, especially, was always “ theirs ”, not ‘ mine ”. Happy couples support each other in all areas. Always support each other ’ s dreams, even when they don ’ t agree or understand.Happy couples support each other in all areas. Always support each other ’ s dreams, even when they don ’ t agree or understand. Happy couples feel a great deal of faith in each other even when one thinks the other is wrong. May not think they are making the right choice but they give their support.Happy couples feel a great deal of faith in each other even when one thinks the other is wrong. May not think they are making the right choice but they give their support.

15 ESCENTIAL CHARACTERISTICS: Marriage is #1, even over the kidsMarriage is #1, even over the kids FidelityFidelity CommitmentCommitment UnselfishnessUnselfishness Time spent togetherTime spent together Talk & listenTalk & listen TouchingTouching Be positive about mate & marriageBe positive about mate & marriage

16 STAGE 1 - INITIAL ADJUSTMENT TO MARRIAGE Before marriage, you are afraid of losing each other.Before marriage, you are afraid of losing each other. After marriage, you are afraid of losing yourself.After marriage, you are afraid of losing yourself. Identity bargaining: The process of role adjustments in a relationship –Identify with a role –Having the role validated by others –Negotiating with the partner to make changes in the role Establishing Boundaries: Adjusting the ties with family of origin

17 Stage 1 continued MARITAL ADJUSTMENTS Family rolesFamily roles Emotional support to partnerEmotional support to partner Adjust personal habitsAdjust personal habits Negotiate gender rolesNegotiate gender roles Establish family & employment prioritiesEstablish family & employment priorities Develop communication skillsDevelop communication skills Manage moneyManage money Establish kin relationship (cohabitating partners usually never accepted as kin)Establish kin relationship (cohabitating partners usually never accepted as kin) Participate in larger communityParticipate in larger community

18 Stage 1 continued IDENTITY BARGAINING: Role adjustment in a relationship. Identify & negotiate.Identify & negotiate. Relationships help us discover ourselves.Relationships help us discover ourselves. An intimate relationship requires us to define who we are.An intimate relationship requires us to define who we are.

19 Stage 1 continued IN-LAWS Daughters who are close sometimes have a problem letting go.Daughters who are close sometimes have a problem letting go. But birth of child helps improve and change this relationship.But birth of child helps improve and change this relationship. Need to establish new boundaries with in-lawsNeed to establish new boundaries with in-laws

20 STAGE 2 - CHILDBEARING FAMILY (From the birth of the first child until that child is 2 ½ years old) Developmental Tasks: Adjusting to increased family size Caring for an infant Providing a positive developmental environment

21 STAGE 3 - FAMILIES WITH PRESCHOOLERS (When the oldest child is between the ages of 2 ½ and 6) Developmental Tasks: Satisfying the needs and interests of preschool childrenSatisfying the needs and interests of preschool children Coping with demands on energy and attention with less privacy at homeCoping with demands on energy and attention with less privacy at home

22 STAGE 4 - FAMILIES WITH SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN (When the oldest child is between the ages of 6 to 13) Developmental Tasks: Promoting educational achievementPromoting educational achievement Fitting in the community of families with school-age childrenFitting in the community of families with school-age children

23 STAGE 5 - FAMILIES WITH TEENAGERS (When the oldest child is between the ages of 13 and 20) Developmental Tasks: Allowing and helping children to become more independentAllowing and helping children to become more independent Coping with their independenceCoping with their independence Developing new interests beyond child careDeveloping new interests beyond child care

24 STAGE 6 – MIDDLE AGE MARRIAGES (LAUNCHING CENTER) May divorce at this time without children present (empty nest which is not always negative).May divorce at this time without children present (empty nest which is not always negative). Boomerang generation: Children return home due to high unemployment, housing cost, low wages, divorce and personal problems.Boomerang generation: Children return home due to high unemployment, housing cost, low wages, divorce and personal problems.

25 STAGE 7 - LATER LIFE MARRIAGES (EMPTY NEST) (More satisfying) Higher incomeHigher income Although widows often have financial hardshipsAlthough widows often have financial hardships But happily married widows choose to remarry more oftenBut happily married widows choose to remarry more often Old age not poverty stricken or neglectedOld age not poverty stricken or neglected Sandwich generation: Must raise dependent children & dependent parents. Intermittent extended family: Take in other relatives in time of need. Does parenting end when children are grown & gone?

26 GRANDPARENTING Grandparents = distance is biggest factor in involvementGrandparents = distance is biggest factor in involvement 25% of preschool children cared for by grandparents25% of preschool children cared for by grandparents Companionate relationships most common with grandchildrenCompanionate relationships most common with grandchildren

27 INDIVIDUAL TASK Stage 1 (18-21 yrs) Developing autonomyStage 1 (18-21 yrs) Developing autonomy Stage 2 (22-28 yrs) Developing intimacy & occupational identificationStage 2 (22-28 yrs) Developing intimacy & occupational identification Stage 3 (29-31 yrs) Deciding about commitment to work & marriageStage 3 (29-31 yrs) Deciding about commitment to work & marriage Stage 4 (32-39 yrs) Deepening commitments; pursuing more long-range goalsStage 4 (32-39 yrs) Deepening commitments; pursuing more long-range goals Stage 5 (40-42 yrs) Searching for “ fit ” between aspirations and environmentStage 5 (40-42 yrs) Searching for “ fit ” between aspirations and environment Stage 6 (43-59 yrs) Re-stabilizing and reordering prioritiesStage 6 (43-59 yrs) Re-stabilizing and reordering priorities State 7 (60+ yrs) Dealing effectively with aging, illness and death wile retaining zest for lifeState 7 (60+ yrs) Dealing effectively with aging, illness and death wile retaining zest for life

28 MARITAL TASK Stage 1 (18-21 yrs) Shift from family of origin to new commitmentStage 1 (18-21 yrs) Shift from family of origin to new commitment Stage 2 (22-28 yrs) Provisional marital commitmentStage 2 (22-28 yrs) Provisional marital commitment Stage 3 (29-31 yrs) Commitment crisis; restlessnessStage 3 (29-31 yrs) Commitment crisis; restlessness Stage 4 (32-39 yrs) Productivity; children, work, friends, & marriageStage 4 (32-39 yrs) Productivity; children, work, friends, & marriage Stage 5 (40-42 yrs) Summing up; success & failure and future goals soughtStage 5 (40-42 yrs) Summing up; success & failure and future goals sought Stage 6 (43-59 yrs) Resolving conflicts and stabilizing the marriage for the long haulStage 6 (43-59 yrs) Resolving conflicts and stabilizing the marriage for the long haul State 7 (60+ yrs) Supporting & enhancing each other ’ s struggle for productivity and fulfillment in face of agingState 7 (60+ yrs) Supporting & enhancing each other ’ s struggle for productivity and fulfillment in face of aging

29 INTIMACY Stage 1 (18-21 yrs) Fragile intimacyStage 1 (18-21 yrs) Fragile intimacy Stage 2 (22-28 yrs) Deepening but ambivalent intimacyStage 2 (22-28 yrs) Deepening but ambivalent intimacy Stage 3 (29-31 yrs) Increasing distance while partners make up their minds about each otherStage 3 (29-31 yrs) Increasing distance while partners make up their minds about each other Stage 4 (32-39 yrs) Increase in intimacy in “ good ” marriages; gradual distancing in “ bad ” marriagesStage 4 (32-39 yrs) Increase in intimacy in “ good ” marriages; gradual distancing in “ bad ” marriages Stage 5 (40-42 yrs) Tenuous intimacy as fantasies about other increaseStage 5 (40-42 yrs) Tenuous intimacy as fantasies about other increase Stage 6 (43-59 yrs) Intimacy is threatened by aging and boredom. Departure of children may increase or decrease intimacy.Stage 6 (43-59 yrs) Intimacy is threatened by aging and boredom. Departure of children may increase or decrease intimacy. State 7 (60+ yrs) Struggle to maintain intimacy in face or eventual separation, usually plateausState 7 (60+ yrs) Struggle to maintain intimacy in face or eventual separation, usually plateaus

30 POWER Stage 1 (18-21 yrs) Testing of powerStage 1 (18-21 yrs) Testing of power Stage 2 (22-28 yrs) Establish pattern of conflict resolutionStage 2 (22-28 yrs) Establish pattern of conflict resolution Stage 3 (29-31 yrs) Sharp vying for power and dominanceStage 3 (29-31 yrs) Sharp vying for power and dominance Stage 4 (32-39 yrs) Establish patterns of decision making and dominanceStage 4 (32-39 yrs) Establish patterns of decision making and dominance Stage 5 (40-42 yrs) Power in outside world is tested via power in the marriageStage 5 (40-42 yrs) Power in outside world is tested via power in the marriage Stage 6 (43-59 yrs) Conflicts often increase when children leave and security appears threatenedStage 6 (43-59 yrs) Conflicts often increase when children leave and security appears threatened State 7 (60+ yrs) Survival fears stir up needs for control and dominanceState 7 (60+ yrs) Survival fears stir up needs for control and dominance

31 MARITAL BOUNDARIES Stage 1 (18-21 yrs) Conflicts over in-lawsStage 1 (18-21 yrs) Conflicts over in-laws Stage 2 (22-28 yrs) Friends and potential lovers; work versus familyStage 2 (22-28 yrs) Friends and potential lovers; work versus family Stage 3 (29-31 yrs) Temporary disruptions including extramarital sex or reactive ‘ fortress building ”Stage 3 (29-31 yrs) Temporary disruptions including extramarital sex or reactive ‘ fortress building ” Stage 4 (32-39 yrs) Nuclear family closes boundariesStage 4 (32-39 yrs) Nuclear family closes boundaries Stage 5 (40-42 yrs) Disruption due to reevaluation; drive versus re-stabilizationStage 5 (40-42 yrs) Disruption due to reevaluation; drive versus re-stabilization Stage 6 (43-59 yrs) Boundaries are usually fixed except in crisisStage 6 (43-59 yrs) Boundaries are usually fixed except in crisis State 7 (60+ yrs) Loss of family & friends leads to closing in of boundaries, important to maintain ties with outside worldState 7 (60+ yrs) Loss of family & friends leads to closing in of boundaries, important to maintain ties with outside world

32 INDIVIDUAL STAGE Stage 1 (18-21 yrs) Develop rootsStage 1 (18-21 yrs) Develop roots Stage 2 (22-28 yrs) Provisional adulthoodStage 2 (22-28 yrs) Provisional adulthood Stage 3 (29-31 yrs) Transition at age 30Stage 3 (29-31 yrs) Transition at age 30 Stage 4 (32-39 yrs) Settling downStage 4 (32-39 yrs) Settling down Stage 5 (40-42 yrs) Midlife transitionStage 5 (40-42 yrs) Midlife transition Stage 6 (43-59 yrs) Middle adulthoodStage 6 (43-59 yrs) Middle adulthood State 7 (60+ yrs) Old ageState 7 (60+ yrs) Old age

33 RETIREMENT Earlier – 75% choose to retire before age 65 (WHY?)Earlier – 75% choose to retire before age 65 (WHY?) More egalitarian marriagesMore egalitarian marriages Highest degree of marital satisfaction since early marriageHighest degree of marital satisfaction since early marriage Improved healthImproved health

34 Read Ann Landers ”Old folks are worth a fortune”

35 CARING FOR AGED Caregiver Conflict Earlier unresolved antagonisms and conflicts.Earlier unresolved antagonisms and conflicts. Caregiver ’ s inability to accept the relative ’ s increasing dependence.Caregiver ’ s inability to accept the relative ’ s increasing dependence. Conflicting loyalties between spouse or children and caring for the elderly.Conflicting loyalties between spouse or children and caring for the elderly. Resentment towards the elderly relative for disrupting family routines.Resentment towards the elderly relative for disrupting family routines. Resentment of lack of involvement by other family members.Resentment of lack of involvement by other family members. Anger if elderly relative tries to manipulate others.Anger if elderly relative tries to manipulate others. Conflicts over money and inheritance.Conflicts over money and inheritance. How could an over abundance of support do more harm than good? Can chronic illness help with family cohesiveness?

36 COPING STRATEGIES Plan for legal and financial incapacitiesPlan for legal and financial incapacities Manage income and expensesManage income and expenses Arrange for long term careArrange for long term care Assess capabilities of whole family unitAssess capabilities of whole family unit Divide responsibilities among whole family unitDivide responsibilities among whole family unit Determine community backup servicesDetermine community backup services

37 Most common diseases and causes of death 1. Arthritis 2. Hypertension 3. Hearing impairment 4. Heart disease 5. Cataracts 6. Deformity orthopedic impairment 7. Diabetes What are the most common causes of death of people over 75? 1. Heart disease 2. Cancer 3. Stroke 4. Lung disease What are the most common chronic diseases of people over 75?

38 CARING FOR FAMILY MEMBER WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSS Strained family relationsStrained family relations Modifications in family activities and goalsModifications in family activities and goals Increased tasks and time commitmentsIncreased tasks and time commitments Increased financial costsIncreased financial costs Special housing requirementsSpecial housing requirements Social isolationSocial isolation Medical concernsMedical concerns Grieving over disabilities,Grieving over disabilities, limitations and restricted life opportunity

39 COPING STATEGIES Make a place for the illness, and keep balance in life.Make a place for the illness, and keep balance in life. Keep communication open.Keep communication open. Cultivate sources of support.Cultivate sources of support. Develop good working relationship with healthcare professionals.Develop good working relationship with healthcare professionals. Discuss in groups: Should a health care professional be “detached”? Do families interfere with the efforts of practitioners to help patients? Should healthcare professionals address things beyond the physical such as economical, emotional, psychological and spiritual issues?

40 DEATH WHY STUDY ABOUT DEATH? Our society is unusual, we shut death in a closetOur society is unusual, we shut death in a closet Death is a natural part of lifeDeath is a natural part of life Death is often emotional and unpleasantDeath is often emotional and unpleasant Death must be facedDeath must be faced Part of our societyPart of our society We used to be more open about deathWe used to be more open about death People used to die at home more oftenPeople used to die at home more often Funerals and viewings were at homeFunerals and viewings were at home Friends and family were there at moment of deathFriends and family were there at moment of death Illnesses were shortIllnesses were short

41 DEATH DENIAL: remove dead from home, not telling children.DENIAL: remove dead from home, not telling children. EXPLOITATION: Desensitized and deny the realities of deathEXPLOITATION: Desensitized and deny the realities of death ROMANITCIZATION: Those lead to think of death as beautiful can be disillusioned.ROMANITCIZATION: Those lead to think of death as beautiful can be disillusioned. Fear: Fear of death keeps us alive. Denial healthy, it keeps us from dwelling on morbidity of death. Acknowledging that death exists can help us prioritize & appreciate. Do handout “Will you live to be 100?”

42 STAGES OF DEATH A dying person should not be expected to behave in a certain manner, only his/her own way. Denial & isolation Denial & isolation Anger Anger Bargaining Bargaining Depression Depression Acceptance Acceptance

43 GRIEVING PROCESS Guilt is common, 1st year is hard at holidays.Guilt is common, 1st year is hard at holidays. Consoling: Listen, don ’ t avoid, give practical support.Consoling: Listen, don ’ t avoid, give practical support. Needs: Death with dignity (respect as human being).Needs: Death with dignity (respect as human being). Hospice can help.Hospice can help.

44 WHAT NOT TO SAY TO THE BEREAVED Cheer upCheer up Time to heal all woundsTime to heal all wounds Come on, you need to get over thisCome on, you need to get over this We want the old “ you ” backWe want the old “ you ” back I ’ ll help you get rid of their thingsI ’ ll help you get rid of their things They ’ re better offThey ’ re better off It was God ’ s willIt was God ’ s will Call me if you need meCall me if you need me

45 WHAT TO SAY TO THE BEREAVED It ’ s OK to cryIt ’ s OK to cry I want you to know I ’ m thinking about youI want you to know I ’ m thinking about you I ’ m sad for youI ’ m sad for you I care about youI care about you I ’ m here if you want to talkI ’ m here if you want to talk “ You don ’ t have to be strong or apologize for crying. ”“ You don ’ t have to be strong or apologize for crying. ” Do accept them and their feelings Let them cry when they want to Let them talk about the dead person (They are in their thoughts often)

46 DEFINITIONS OF DEATH LEGAL DEATH: Court says it has irreversible cessation to total brain functionLEGAL DEATH: Court says it has irreversible cessation to total brain function THEOLOGICAL DEATH: Occurs when soul leaves the body THEOLOGICAL DEATH: Occurs when soul leaves the body MEDICAL DEATH: Occurs when functions of human life stopMEDICAL DEATH: Occurs when functions of human life stop UNRECEPTIVITY & UNRESPONSIVITY: Irreversible comaUNRECEPTIVITY & UNRESPONSIVITY: Irreversible coma

47 DEFINITIONS OF DEATH continued NO MOVEMENTS OR BREATHING: No muscle movement or respiration for at least 1 hourNO MOVEMENTS OR BREATHING: No muscle movement or respiration for at least 1 hour NO REFLEXES: Pupils fixed and dilated – will not respond to bright lightsNO REFLEXES: Pupils fixed and dilated – will not respond to bright lights FLAT ELECTROENCE PHALGRAM: EEG – no brain waves for a period of timeFLAT ELECTROENCE PHALGRAM: EEG – no brain waves for a period of time

48 DEATH VOCABULARY AUTOPSY: Post mortem examAUTOPSY: Post mortem exam BEREAVEMENT: Being grieved by the loss of a loved one.BEREAVEMENT: Being grieved by the loss of a loved one. CASKET: Small chest or box (coffin)CASKET: Small chest or box (coffin) COFFIN: A box or chest for burying a corpseCOFFIN: A box or chest for burying a corpse CREMATION: To reduce a dead body to ashes by burningCREMATION: To reduce a dead body to ashes by burning CREMATORIUM: A furnace for cremationCREMATORIUM: A furnace for cremation

49 DEATH VOCABULARY continued CRYPT: A chamber or vault wholly or partly underground, a vault under the main floor of a churchCRYPT: A chamber or vault wholly or partly underground, a vault under the main floor of a church DEATH CERTIFICATE: A certificate that certifies the death of a personDEATH CERTIFICATE: A certificate that certifies the death of a person DECEASED: No longer livingDECEASED: No longer living EMBALM: To treat a dead body so as to protect from decayEMBALM: To treat a dead body so as to protect from decay EPITAPH: An inscription on or at a tomb or grave in memory of the one buried thereEPITAPH: An inscription on or at a tomb or grave in memory of the one buried there

50 DEATH VOCABULARY continued EULOGY: A commendatory formal statement or set orationEULOGY: A commendatory formal statement or set oration EUTHANASIA: The act or practice of killing individuals that are hopelessly sick or injured for reasons of mercy.EUTHANASIA: The act or practice of killing individuals that are hopelessly sick or injured for reasons of mercy. FUNERAL HOME: An establishment with facilities for the preparation of the dead for burial or cremation, for the viewing of the body and for funerals.FUNERAL HOME: An establishment with facilities for the preparation of the dead for burial or cremation, for the viewing of the body and for funerals. HEARSE: A vehicle for conveying the dead to the graveHEARSE: A vehicle for conveying the dead to the grave INHERITANCE: The act of coming into possession of somethingINHERITANCE: The act of coming into possession of something INTERMENT: The act or ceremony of depositing the dead body in the earth or the tomb.INTERMENT: The act or ceremony of depositing the dead body in the earth or the tomb.

51 DEATH VOCABULARY continued MAUSOLEUM: Large tomb usually a stone building for places of entombment for dead above the ground.MAUSOLEUM: Large tomb usually a stone building for places of entombment for dead above the ground. MORGUE: A place where the bodies of persons found dead are kept until identified and claimed by relatives or are released for burial.MORGUE: A place where the bodies of persons found dead are kept until identified and claimed by relatives or are released for burial. MORTICIAN: UndertakerMORTICIAN: Undertaker MORTUARY: Relating to the burial of the deadMORTUARY: Relating to the burial of the dead

52 DEATH VOCABULARY continued OBITUARY: A notice of a persons death with a short biographical accountOBITUARY: A notice of a persons death with a short biographical account PALLBEARERS: People who help to carry the coffin at a funeralPALLBEARERS: People who help to carry the coffin at a funeral PYRE: A combustible heap for burning a dead body as a funeral vilePYRE: A combustible heap for burning a dead body as a funeral vile REINCARNATION: Rebirth in new bodies or forms of lifeREINCARNATION: Rebirth in new bodies or forms of life SARCOPHAGUS: A stone coffinSARCOPHAGUS: A stone coffin

53 DEATH VOCABULARY continued TOMB: An excavation in which a corpse is buriedTOMB: An excavation in which a corpse is buried URN: A vessel that is particularly an ornamental vase on a pedestal to preserve the ashes after cremationURN: A vessel that is particularly an ornamental vase on a pedestal to preserve the ashes after cremation VAULT: A burial chamberVAULT: A burial chamber WAKE: The watch held over the body of a dread person prior to burial and sometimes accompanied by festivityWAKE: The watch held over the body of a dread person prior to burial and sometimes accompanied by festivity

54 CULTURES Jewish: 7 days of restrictions like shaving, working, sex, 11 months pray for parent dailyJewish: 7 days of restrictions like shaving, working, sex, 11 months pray for parent daily Mexico: Dead honored with gifts of food, prayer, nightly vigilsMexico: Dead honored with gifts of food, prayer, nightly vigils

55 VOCABULARY 1. Bereavement: The response to a loved ones death, including customs, and the grieving process.1. Bereavement: The response to a loved ones death, including customs, and the grieving process. 2. Boomerang Generation: Adults who return to family home and live with parents.2. Boomerang Generation: Adults who return to family home and live with parents. 3. Caregiver role: The one who provides the most physical care and decision making.3. Caregiver role: The one who provides the most physical care and decision making. 4. Duration of Marriage Effect: Accumulation over time of negative factors that affect marital satisfaction.4. Duration of Marriage Effect: Accumulation over time of negative factors that affect marital satisfaction. 5. Empty Nest: When last grown child has left home, usually not associated with mother ’ s depression.5. Empty Nest: When last grown child has left home, usually not associated with mother ’ s depression.

56 VOCABULARY cont ’ d 6. Family Life Cycle: The families changing roles and relationships at various stages, beginning with marriage and ending with death of a spouse.6. Family Life Cycle: The families changing roles and relationships at various stages, beginning with marriage and ending with death of a spouse. 7. Honeymoon Effect: Tendency of newly married couples to overlook problems.7. Honeymoon Effect: Tendency of newly married couples to overlook problems. 8. Hospice: A place or program caring for terminally ill, emphasizing patient care and family support.8. Hospice: A place or program caring for terminally ill, emphasizing patient care and family support. 9. Identity Bargaining: The process of roles adjustments in a relationship, involving identifying with a role, role validated by others, negotiated with partner9. Identity Bargaining: The process of roles adjustments in a relationship, involving identifying with a role, role validated by others, negotiated with partner

57 VOCABULARY cont ’ d 10. Intermittent Extended Family: Taking into the family other relatives in times of need10. Intermittent Extended Family: Taking into the family other relatives in times of need 11. Sandwich Generation: Individuals who care for both their own children and aging parents at the same time.11. Sandwich Generation: Individuals who care for both their own children and aging parents at the same time.


Download ppt "CHAPTER 10 – FAMILY LIFE CYCLE Instructor: Wendy Crapo."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google