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Re-imagining the CUNY Food System for Health, Equity and Sustainability Nicholas Freudenberg City University of New York School Of Public Health and Hunter.

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Presentation on theme: "Re-imagining the CUNY Food System for Health, Equity and Sustainability Nicholas Freudenberg City University of New York School Of Public Health and Hunter."— Presentation transcript:

1 Re-imagining the CUNY Food System for Health, Equity and Sustainability Nicholas Freudenberg City University of New York School Of Public Health and Hunter College Healthy CUNY October 21, 2014 Thanks to Sara Barton, MPH and Kim Libman, PhD, MPH for their research on CUNY food system and to Patti Lamberson,MPH and Stephanie Kneeshaw Price, PhD, for their contributions to Healthy CUNY student surveys

2 What is CUNY? A Profile of CUNY’s Undergraduate Students in % are first generation to attend college 42% speak a native language other than English 39% live in households that earn > $20,000 per year 38% born outside United States mainland 30% work for pay more than 20 hours a week 27% are age 25 or older 15% are caring for their children 29% Latino, 26.8% Black, 25.6% White, 18.3% Asian or Pacific Islander In 2013, CUNY enrolled 260,000 degree students and 240,000 continuing education students CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

3 The Health and Social Well-being of CUNY Students Surveys show CUNY undergraduates report in last 12 months: 42% some level of food insecurity 42% some level of housing instability 37% are obese or overweight 19% symptoms of depression 17% no health insurance coverage 14% no regular source of health care CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

4 Overview of Unhealthy Behaviors of CUNY Undergrads

5 CUNY Student Food Behaviors Food Behavior Percent Healthy behaviors More then 3 portions fruits & vegetables a day33 Purchased healthy food from campus vending machine in past month 38 Purchased healthy food from campus cafeteria in past month42 Less than 1 can soda a day73 Unhealthy behaviors More than 1 can soda a day on campus18 More than 1 can soda a day27 Purchased unhealthy food from cafeteria in past month28 Purchased unhealthy food from vending machine in past month58 Less than 2 portions fruits & vegetables a day67

6 CUNY: The face of universities in America’s future CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

7 Components of University Food Systems 1. Cafeteria food services --- facilities, food, labor, cooking, pricing, quality, revenues, sourcing and procurement 2. Vending machines contracts – product mix, revenues, accessibility 3. Pouring rights contracts –revenues, promotion 4. Waste practices-- recycling, composting 5. Policies on food served at campus events 6. Information and education -- calorie labeling, nutrition courses 7. Food benefits for students -- SNAP enrollment, financial aid, food pantries 8. Governance—who decides what? 9. Campus fringe food-- What can students buy and eat within short distance from campus? CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

8 CUNY Food Service Contractors Estimated number of employees: 475 FT 171 PT Total 646

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10 CUNY’s Pouring Right Contract with Pepsi “the Board of Trustees of The City University of New York authorize the University to choose a beverage manufacturer to be the exclusive provider of soft drinks, teas, waters, juices and certain other beverages to the University (i.e., “pouring rights”), in exchange for the payment of royalties and other valuable consideration to the University and college related entities. At the University’s option, such beverage manufacturer also may be granted the right to operate beverage vending machines at some or all of the colleges and the Central Office, in exchange for a commission on sales…” CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

11 More on CUNY and Pepsi Pouring Rights In September 2013, CUNY signed $20.75 million agreement that gives the Pepsi-Cola exclusive rights to provide most carbonated and noncarbonated drinks on campuses for next 10 years. After contract took effect, Pepsi distributed first-year royalties of more than $1.38 million above the previous contracts that individual colleges had signed with varying vendors. Future royalties will vary with sales. Colleges will use revenue to enhance programs. In addition, the CUNY Athletic Conference will receive $300,000 over 10 years; previously, it did not receive any income from “pouring rights.” Another $200,000 over the life of the contract will support CUNY-wide or campus-based sustainability initiatives. CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

12 Food Served at Campus Events CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

13 The Campus Food Fringe CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

14 The City University of New York should Mandate that CUNY food vendors meet the New York City Agency Food Standards for healthier food for all food sold and meals served on campus and campus vending machines. Subsidize “Quick & Healthy” daily lunch specials so that every student can find at least a few healthy and affordable foods every day. Eliminate “pouring rights” contracts at CUNY that allow one beverage company to have a monopoly on that campus in exchange for a payment to the college. Require CUNY cafeterias to post menu boards that list the calorie and fat content of the products they sell. Consider making selection of a food service vendor a CUNY-wide rather than a campus decision in order to increase the University’s market influence for healthier more affordable cafeteria food.

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17 Vision of a Transformed University Food System  Healthier food is easier to find and less expensive than unhealthy food  No university student experiences food insecurity  A large and growing portion of food served is regionally grown  University food procurement practices encourage regional sourcing and fair labor practices  Every graduate has essential knowledge about food, nutrition, cooking and food policy  University practices discourage waste and promote recycling, composting and sustainability  University food practices contribute to local and regional economic development CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

18 For more information or to volunteer contact: Healthy CUNY or New York City Food Policy Center Nick Freudenberg CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH


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