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Solid Waste Integrated Resources Plan Draft Program Environmental Impact Report Solid Waste Integrated Resources Plan Draft Program Environmental Impact.

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Presentation on theme: "Solid Waste Integrated Resources Plan Draft Program Environmental Impact Report Solid Waste Integrated Resources Plan Draft Program Environmental Impact."— Presentation transcript:

1 Solid Waste Integrated Resources Plan Draft Program Environmental Impact Report Solid Waste Integrated Resources Plan Draft Program Environmental Impact Report All of us together can make

2 Agenda 1.Background 2.Solid Waste Integrated Resources Plan (SWIRP) 3.Draft Program Environmental Impact Report (Draft PEIR) 4.Next Steps

3 The Solid Waste Integrated Resources Plan (SWIRP) is a long-range master plan that includes Policies, Programs and Facilities to achieve the City’s goal of 90 percent diversion by 2025

4 SWIRP Schedule 2007 – 2008 Tasks: Public Outreach & Stakeholder Guiding Principles Events: Regional Workshops Citywide Conferences 2009 – 2011 Tasks: Policy, Program & Facility Plan Events: Regional Workshops Citywide Conference Tasks: Environmental Impact Report Events: Public hearings on Draft PEIR 2012 – 2014 Tasks: Financial Plan & Implementation Strategy Events: Regional Workshops Citywide Conference

5 Stakeholder Involvement SWIRP is a Stakeholder-driven Planning Process 42 regional workshops and 3 citywide conferences during Phase 1 21 regional workshops and 1 citywide conference during Phase key constituent interviews 27 house meetings 75 business meetings

6 Stakeholder Guiding Principles 1.Education to decrease consumption 2.City leadership as a model for zero waste practices 3.Education to increase recycling 4.City leadership to increase recycling 5.Manufacturer responsibility 6.Consumer responsibility 7.Convenience 8.Incentives 9.New, safe, technology 10.Protect public health and the environment 11.Equity 12.Economic efficiency

7 SWIRP Master Plan Elements 1.Expansion of existing residential and commercial programs 2.Implementation of new downstream policies and programs 3.Implementation of mandatory participation programs 4.Adoption of upstream policies 5.Development of processing facilities 6.Disposal of remaining residual waste at local or remote landfills

8 Expansion of Existing Programs To further increase solid waste management and landfill diversion Proposed Sample Programs: Expand recycling for multi-family buildings LAUSD blue-bin recycling program Restaurant food scrap recycling program

9 Leader Among Big Cities in the U.S. Source for City of Los Angeles: Zero Waste Progress Report, March 2013 Source for other cities: Waste & Recycling News, Municipal Recycling Survey 2011, February 21, 2011

10 Downstream Policies and Programs Address collection, processing, diversion, and disposal of materials after they are generated Proposed Sample Programs: Recycling ambassadors Bulky item reuse and recycling Food scrap recycling program

11 Mandatory Participation Programs Motivate all waste generators to separate materials and place them in the appropriate blue bin, green bin, or other appropriate collection bins on a regular basis Proposed Sample Programs: Mandatory recycling separation Mandatory organics separation Increase diversion at construction/demolition facilities

12 Upstream Policies Minimize the amount of waste prior to the point of generation Proposed Sample Policies: Advocate for legislation to make businesses responsible for their products and packaging Producer responsibility for toxics and difficult to recycle material Plastic bag ban/$0.10 fee on paper bags Blue Dot/Green Dot Program

13 Processing Facilities Development of future facilities to meet the City’s recycling and solid waste infrastructure needs through 2030 SWIRP does not determine where these facilities would be located, rather, it identifies the potential number of facilities that would be needed

14 Facility Types Blue and Green Bin Processing Facilities Clean Material Recycling Facilities (MRFs) Composting and/or Anaerobic Digestion Resource Recovery Centers Black Bin Processing Facilities Alternative Technology – Mixed Material Processing Alternative Technology – Advanced Thermal Recycling Alternative Technology – Biological Alternative Technology – Thermal

15 Clean Materials Recovery Facility (MRFs) Blue Bin Stream Tons per day Revenue per ton$10-30 Acres required5 Phoenix North Transfer Station and Material Recovery Facility Curbside Processing Tonnage, cost, and acreage estimates from SWIRP Facility Plan, October 2013

16 Composting - Large Scale and Small Scale Green Bin Stream Z-Best Composting Facility, Gilroy Griffith Park Composting Facility Tons per day100-1,000 Cost per ton$40-60 Acres required15-60 Tonnage, cost, and acreage estimates from SWIRP Facility Plan, October 2013

17 Resource Recovery Center Blue Bin Stream Tons per day1-10 Cost per ton$100 Acres required2 Monterey Regional Waste Management District Tonnage, cost, and acreage estimates from SWIRP Facility Plan, October 2013

18 Alternative Technology – Mixed Material Processing (Black Bin Stream) Tons per day Cost per ton$40-60 Acres required5-7 Rainbow Disposal, Huntington Beach Mixed Material Processing Tonnage, cost, and acreage estimates from SWIRP Facility Plan, October 2013

19 Alternative Technology – Advanced Thermal Recycling (Black Bin Stream) Tons per day500-2,000 Cost per ton$ Acres required5-15 Müllverwertung Rugenberger Damm Advanced Thermal Recycling Facility - Hamburg, Germany TREA Breisgau Advanced Thermal Recycling - Freiberg, Germany Tonnage, cost, and acreage estimates from SWIRP Facility Plan, October 2013

20 Alternative Technology - Biological (Anaerobic Digestion) - Black Bin Stream Tons per day Cost per ton$ Acres required5-10 Dranco, Brecht, Belgium Valorga Process, Barcelona, Spain Tonnage, cost, and acreage estimates from SWIRP Facility Plan, October 2013

21 Alternative Technology – Thermal (Gasification/Pyrolysis/Plasma Arc) – Black Bin Stream Tons per day500 Cost per ton$ Acres required7 JFE Thermoselect - Chiba, Japan Plasco Conversion System - Ottawa, Canada Tonnage, cost, and acreage estimates from SWIRP Facility Plan, October 2013

22 Facility Needs Full implementation of the SWIRP policies and programs would require the permitting, construction, and operation of the following additional blue, green, and black bin facilities: One large-scale composting facility or six small- scale composting facilities Three clean material recovery facilities One resource recovery center Five alternative technology facilities

23 Disposal of Remaining Residual Waste After implementing various policies, programs, and constructing needed facilities to achieve the goals of SWIRP, the residual waste will need to be transported and disposed at landfills Options include: Local Landfill, Truck Haul Remote Landfills, Truck Haul Remote Landfill, Rail Haul

24 Policy, Program, and Facility Phasing 1 1 Phasing assumed may not reflect actual implementation and/or roll-out of specific policies, programs and/or facilities. 2 Facilities may be implemented by either the public or private sector, or by joint public-private partnerships, and may also include expansions to existing facilities. 3 Statewide mandatory commercial recycling for commercial customers generating four cubic yards or greater of solid waste per week was implemented in July Mandatory recycling and composting for all generators will be implemented locally by 2020.

25 Environmental Review Process Development of Program Environmental Impact Report (PEIR) pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Circulated Notice of Preparation Held Scoping Meeting Prepared Technical Studies and Draft PEIR Circulate Draft PEIR for review (45 days) Prepare response to public comments Produce Final PEIR SWIRP Plan and PEIR considered at City Council hearing

26 Purpose of Environmental Review Disclose potential impacts of a project Inform decision-makers and the public Identify mitigation measures to reduce impacts

27 About Program EIRs Prepared for a series of actions that can be characterized as one large project Analysis will be programmatic in nature Additional CEQA analysis required

28 Potentially Significant, Mitigable Impacts Aesthetics Agricultural Resources Biological Resources Cultural Resources Geology and Soils Hazards and Hazardous Materials Hydrology and Water Quality Land Use and Planning Mineral Resources Noise Population and Housing Public Services and Utilities Recreation Implementation of proposed mitigation measures in the PEIR would reduce the potential significant impacts associated with each environmental issue area to a level that is less than significant.

29 Potentially Significant, Unmitigable Impacts Air Quality and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions (Cumulative) Transportation and Traffic Implementation of proposed mitigation measures will reduce the potential impact to these resources to the extent feasible; however, the potential impact will remain significant and unmitigated at this program level of environmental review and pending more detailed site-specific analysis at the project level of environmental review. If the City chooses to approve the SWIRP project, it must adopt a “Statement of Overriding Considerations” pursuant to Sections and 15126(b) of the CEQA Guidelines.

30 SWIRP Draft PEIR Alternatives Alternative 1 No Project /Landfill Alternative Alternative 2 Expansion of Existing Policies and Programs - No New Policies or Programs Alternative 3 Expansion of Existing Policies and Programs plus New Downstream Policies and Programs Alternative 4 New Policies and Programs plus Implementation of Mandatory Participation Policies and Programs Alternative 5 New Policies and Programs plus Implementation of Upstream Policies and Programs None of the alternatives considered are environmentally superior to the proposed project because they do not meet all the project goals and objectives.

31 Next Steps Circulate Draft PEIR for 45-day public review −Opportunity for public comment −Comments due December 20 th, 2013 Prepare Final PEIR and Response to Comments −January-February 2014 Council Hearing −Spring 2014 −Opportunity for public comment

32 Lead Agency Contact Ms. Reina Pereira, P.E. City of Los Angeles Department of Public Works, Bureau of Sanitation Public Works Building (PWB) MS South Broadway, 5 th Floor Los Angeles, CA Phone: (213)


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