Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Critical Thinking in the College Classroom: Teaching the Teachers Bill Reynolds, Mark Berg, & Jedediah Morfit The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Critical Thinking in the College Classroom: Teaching the Teachers Bill Reynolds, Mark Berg, & Jedediah Morfit The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey."— Presentation transcript:

1 Critical Thinking in the College Classroom: Teaching the Teachers Bill Reynolds, Mark Berg, & Jedediah Morfit The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey

2 Session overview Project background (Stockton Critical Thinking Institute) Project background (Stockton Critical Thinking Institute) Perspective on critical thinking Perspective on critical thinking Framework for teaching CT Framework for teaching CT –Elements of thought, intellectual standards, intellectual traits –SEEI (state, elaborate, exemplify, illustrate) –Model activities Discussion Discussion Questions Questions (Additional components of SCTI) (Additional components of SCTI) 2

3 Objectives Upon completion of the session, participants will be able to: 1.Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the benefit to student learning of explicit, deliberate instruction of critical thinking in subject area courses. 2.Incorporate the “elements of thought” into critical thinking instruction in their disciplines. 3.Promote the “intellectual standards” in their critical thinking instruction. 4.Explain a coherent framework for integrating critical thinking instruction into their teaching. 3

4 Origins of SCTI Personal experiences, assessment evidence of students’ difficulties with CT skills Personal experiences, assessment evidence of students’ difficulties with CT skills Desire for community of like-minded colleagues who are interested in exploring responses to CT deficits Desire for community of like-minded colleagues who are interested in exploring responses to CT deficits CT working group, summer 2011 CT working group, summer Plan Grant (internal), summer Plan Grant (internal), summer

5 SCTI Structure 2 day summer institute 2 day summer institute –Day 1: CT Pedagogy –Day 2: Syllabus adaptation/development Peer observations and coaching sessions, fall and/or spring semesters Peer observations and coaching sessions, fall and/or spring semesters Follow up meeting during the semester Follow up meeting during the semester –Assess progress –Exchange ideas Summer conference, Foundation for CT, Berkeley Summer conference, Foundation for CT, Berkeley 5

6 Our perspective on CT One definition: One definition: –“reasonable reflective thinking focused on deciding what to believe or do” (Ennis, 1997) Framework for teaching CT skills (from The Foundation for Critical Thinking) Framework for teaching CT skills (from The Foundation for Critical Thinking)The Foundation for Critical ThinkingThe Foundation for Critical Thinking –Elements of thought –Intellectual standards –Intellectual traits –Logic of the discipline/fundamental and powerful concepts 6

7 Fundamental premise To analyze thinking we must identify and question its elemental structures. To analyze thinking we must identify and question its elemental structures. The elements and standards that follow give us a framework that students can apply to course content (readings, lectures, etc.), arguments made by their peers, and their own writing to broaden and deepen their understanding and improve their reasoning ability. The elements and standards that follow give us a framework that students can apply to course content (readings, lectures, etc.), arguments made by their peers, and their own writing to broaden and deepen their understanding and improve their reasoning ability. 7

8 The Elements of Thought The Elements of Thought Intellectual Standards Clarity Clarity Accuracy Accuracy Precision Precision Relevance Relevance Depth Depth Breadth Breadth Logic Logic Significance Significance Fairness Fairness 8

9 Intellectual traits or virtues Integrity Integrity Independence Independence Perseverance Perseverance Empathy Empathy Humility Humility Courage Courage Confidence in reason Confidence in reason Fairmindedness Fairmindedness 9

10 SEE-I approach to clarity State: Could you state your basic point in one simple sentence? State: Could you state your basic point in one simple sentence? Elaborate: Could you elaborate your basic point more fully? (In other words…) Elaborate: Could you elaborate your basic point more fully? (In other words…) Exemplify: Could you give me an example of your point from your experience? Exemplify: Could you give me an example of your point from your experience? Illustrate: Could you give me a metaphor or an analogy (or draw a picture, diagram, etc.) to help me see what you mean? Illustrate: Could you give me a metaphor or an analogy (or draw a picture, diagram, etc.) to help me see what you mean? 10

11 Socratic questioning What was the most important thing you learned in the first session? What was the most important thing you learned in the first session? –Write for 2 minutes –Share in triads –Report to whole group Socratic questioning is modeled by facilitator using responses from the groups as content. Socratic questioning is modeled by facilitator using responses from the groups as content. 11

12 Explanation of questioning process The quality of our thinking is given in the quality of our questions. The quality of our thinking is given in the quality of our questions. Your framework for determining what questions to ask: Your framework for determining what questions to ask: –Elements of thought –Intellectual standards –SEEI approach (state, elaborate, exemplify, illustrate) 12

13 Socratic questioning activity Organize yourselves into groups of 3 (try to keep a little space between your group and others). Organize yourselves into groups of 3 (try to keep a little space between your group and others). Prompt: For the next two minutes, free write about the following statement: Prompt: For the next two minutes, free write about the following statement: –In the classroom, the goal of teaching subject matter content should take a back seat to the goal of facilitating critical thinking. One person agrees to be person A; B to her/his right; C to B’s right. One person agrees to be person A; B to her/his right; C to B’s right. A is questioner, B is respondent, C is observer. A is questioner, B is respondent, C is observer. A begins by asking B a question related to the prompt statement and proceeds to ask questions based on B’s response. A begins by asking B a question related to the prompt statement and proceeds to ask questions based on B’s response. C observes and takes notes to provide feedback and questions to A about the nature of the questions (elements, standards, SEEI?). C observes and takes notes to provide feedback and questions to A about the nature of the questions (elements, standards, SEEI?). Switch roles to right (i.e., C is questioner, etc.) when prompted. Switch roles to right (i.e., C is questioner, etc.) when prompted. Report back to whole group.` Report back to whole group.` 13

14 Critical Evaluation of Socratic Process What was your experience of this activity? What was your experience of this activity? What was it like being questioned? What was it like being questioned? How did you feel while questioning your partner? How did you feel while questioning your partner? How was it to observe the process? How was it to observe the process? Having assumed all three roles, try to inhabit the student point of view. How do you think your students would respond to this approach? Having assumed all three roles, try to inhabit the student point of view. How do you think your students would respond to this approach? 14

15 QUESTIONS 15

16 Additional components of the SCTI (1) Fundamental and powerful concepts (from Nosich, 2005): explain or help us think about a huge body of questions, problems, information, and situations within a discipline or course. are the most essential or useful ideas in a discipline. are to be contrasted with individual bits of information, or with less general concepts. reflect the primary and essential thinking trait(s) you want students to achieve at the end of an assignment/course. Bottom Line: What you are aiming for is to make those f&p concepts part of the way students think in your field or discipline. 16

17 Additional components of the SCTI (2) Logic of the discipline Logic of the discipline (from Nosich, 2005): Know what ideas are central to that discipline—its f & p concepts Know what ideas are central to that discipline—its f & p concepts Understand the logic of the field and its point of view Understand the logic of the field and its point of view Know and use the symbol system(s) of that discipline (terms, jargon, shorthand, forms) Know and use the symbol system(s) of that discipline (terms, jargon, shorthand, forms) Understand what you bring to the field (point of view, impediments, filters, etc.) Understand what you bring to the field (point of view, impediments, filters, etc.) Move from outsider (apprentice) to insider (professional) Move from outsider (apprentice) to insider (professional) 17


Download ppt "Critical Thinking in the College Classroom: Teaching the Teachers Bill Reynolds, Mark Berg, & Jedediah Morfit The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google