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Critical Thinking about Affective Issues as it Relates to Student Motivation Presentation by: Andrea Kelly, Ph.D.

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Presentation on theme: "Critical Thinking about Affective Issues as it Relates to Student Motivation Presentation by: Andrea Kelly, Ph.D."— Presentation transcript:

1 Critical Thinking about Affective Issues as it Relates to Student Motivation Presentation by: Andrea Kelly, Ph.D.

2 What is Critical Thinking? The art of analyzing and evaluating thinking with a view to improving it. Paul, R. & Elder, L. (2009). The miniature guide to critical thinking concepts and tools. See page 2.

3 The Human Mind Basic functions of the mind: Think – Figure things out Feel – Positive or negative emotions Desire – What we want Elder, L. & Paul, R. (2009). The miniature guide to taking charge of the human mind.

4 Think, Feel, Desire I thinkI wantI feel Elder, L. & Paul, R. (2009). The miniature guide to taking charge of the human mind.

5 Thinking Controls … Your THINKING controls Your FEELINGS Your DECISIONS Elder, L. & Paul, R. (2009). The miniature guide to taking charge of the human mind.

6 Stages of Critical Thinking Development Unreflective Thinker Unaware of problems in thinking Challenged Thinker Faced with problems in thinking Beginning Thinker Try to improve without regular practice Practicing Thinker Regularly practice and advance Advanced Thinker Committed to lifelong practice; internalize intellectual virtues Accomplished Thinker Intellectual skills & virtues are second nature Paul, R. & Elder, L. (2009). The miniature guide to critical thinking concepts and tools. See page 20.

7 Standards, Elements, & Traits Standards Quality Accuracy Relevance Logicalness Breadth Precision Significance Competence Fairness Depth Elements Purposes Questions Points of View Information Inferences Concepts Implications Assumptions Intellectual Traits Intellectual Humility Intellectual Autonomy Intellectual Integrity Intellectual Courage Intellectual Perseverance Confidence in Reason Intellectual Empathy Fairmindedness Paul, R. & Elder, L. (2009). The miniature guide to critical thinking concepts and tools. See page 19. Critical thinkers routinely apply intellectual standards to the elements of reasoning in order to develop intellectual traits

8 Two Assumptions In our examination of ways to help students think critically about affective issues that impede their academic success, we assume that 1.Students possess the cognitive ability to perform well 2.Affective issues are not a result of biological or physical concerns biological – chemical imbalance physical – hungry or cold

9 Affective Issues that Impede Learning What kinds of affective issues impede student learning in your subject area?

10 Focus on ONE target area Examine one affective issue at a time – E.g., motivation, confidence “drill down” in order to – Identify a specific issue of focus – Decide on an activity to support the critical thinking process MotivationInterest No Life Connection

11 Activity, Reflection, & Assignment Begin with an activity (related to the affective issue) Include a reflection (critical thinking) End with an assignment (related to content) ConfidenceAnxiety Public Speaking Accent ConfidenceAnxiety Public Speaking Unfriendly Strangers Affective issues should be explored experientially (not by telling)

12 Activity Identify the country or state each where each person is from – Amy – Constantine – Kyle – Julian – Rochelle accent%20round%202

13 Activity Answer Identify the country or state each where each person is from – Amy: Minnesota – Constantine: Zimbabwe – Kyle: Australia – Julian: London – Rochelle: New Zealand accent%20round%202

14 Reflection Purpose – To determine why I am conscious of my accent Question – Does my accent prevent others from understanding what I say? Data, information, and evidence – Feedback from those with whom I communicate Inferences – I am not effectively communicating my thoughts

15 Reflection continued Concepts – A person’s “accent” becomes permanent as they get older (past teenage years) Assumptions – My pronunciation is incorrect Implications & Consequences – It is possible to be an effective communicator regardless of my accent Point of View – There is no “right” accent – People make assumptions about someone based on a number of factors (not just their accent) – The video / class discussion suggests that everyone has an accent, and there is no one correct pronunciation for a given word.

16 Assignment Create a 5-minute speech Draft an outline of the speech Focus on the content you will present (not your accent as you present) Practice delivering your speech ahead of time

17 Final Thoughts Determine the affective area of focus through class survey or prior experience Vary activities to include individual and group


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