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TAKE A STAND B ULLYING AND W HAT YOU C AN D O A BOUT I T.

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Presentation on theme: "TAKE A STAND B ULLYING AND W HAT YOU C AN D O A BOUT I T."— Presentation transcript:

1 TAKE A STAND B ULLYING AND W HAT YOU C AN D O A BOUT I T

2 T HIS W AY, T OWARDS B RAVERY W HERE Y OUTH A RE E MPOWERED. T HIS W AY, T OWARDS A CCEPTANCE W HERE H UMANITY IS E MBRACED. T HIS W AY, T OWARDS L OVE W HERE I NDIVIDUALITY IS E NCOURAGED.

3 T HE HUMANITY OF BEING HUMAN The FormulaThe Formula: A High School Thesis. Coperas Cove High School Trust – Let someone earn it Gossip is not part of the formula of knowing someone Any outcome you want can be reached Not everything can workout for someone…especially a teenager. Words hurt just as much as a punch If you had the chance of doing something nice to someone, wouldn’t you chose that over hurting them? None of us are guaranteed the next heartbeat, why not use it for good?

4 T HE B ASICS Take A Stand: Bullying and what you can do about it

5 Bullying is aggressive behavior that is intentional and that involves an imbalance of power. Most often, it is repeated over time. B ULLYING …..

6 D EFINITION OF HARASSMENT AND BULLYING IN THE I OWA LAW *: Any electronic, written, verbal, or physical act or conduct toward a student which is based on any actual or perceived trait/ characteristic of the student and which creates an objectively hostile school environment that meets one or more of the following conditions: Places the student in reasonable fear of harm to the student's person or property. Has a substantially detrimental effect on the student's physical or mental health. Has the effect of substantially interfering with a student's academic performance. Has the effect of substantially interfering with the student's ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or privileges provided by a school.

7 W HERE AND W HEN B ULLYING H APPENS Bullying can occur anytime. School Playground Bus Neighborhood Internet

8 T YPES OF B ULLYING There are three types of bullying: Verbal Social Physical

9 V ERBAL BULLYING Verbal bullying is saying or writing mean things. Verbal bullying includes: Teasing Name-calling Inappropriate sexual comments Taunting Threatening to cause harm

10 S OCIAL BULLYING Social bullying, sometimes referred to as relational bullying, involves hurting someone’s reputation or relationships. Social bullying includes: Leaving someone out on purpose Telling other children not to be friends with someone Spreading rumors about someone Embarrassing someone in public

11 P HYSICAL BULLYING Physical bullying involves hurting a person’s body or possessions. Physical bullying includes: Hitting/kicking/pinching Spitting Tripping/pushing Taking or breaking someone’s things Making mean or rude hand gestures

12 P OTENTIAL C ONSEQUENCES /O UTCOMES OF B ULLYING : Research shows that persistent bullying in youth* contributes to feelings of loneliness and isolation, serious mental health consequences including depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation and suicide attempts *(those who are bullied and those who bully others)

13 B E THE DIFFERENCE BULLY Trailer 13 million kids will be Bullied this year. Kids will be kids, boys will be boys. When we come together we can do anything If we all do it together we will change the world

14 C YBERBULLYING Take A Stand: Bullying and what you can do about it

15 C YBERBULLYING …. Cyberbullying is bullying that takes place using electronic technology. Includes devices and equipment such as: cell phones, computers, tablets Communication tools including social media sites, text messages, chat, and websites.

16 C YBERBULLYING …. Examples of cyberbullying include: mean text messages or s, rumors sent by or posted on social networking sites, and embarrassing pictures, videos, websites, or fake profiles.

17 C YBERBULLYING ….B E T HE V OICE

18 W HY CYBERBULLYING IS DIFFERENT Kids who are being cyberbullied are often bullied in person as well. Kids who are cyberbullied have a harder time getting away from the behavior. Cyberbullying can happen 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and reach a kid even when he or she is alone. Cyberbullying messages and images can be posted anonymously and distributed quickly to a very wide audience. It can be difficult and sometimes impossible to trace the source. Deleting inappropriate or harassing messages, texts, and pictures is extremely difficult after they have been posted or sent.

19 E FFECTS OF CYBERBULLYING Cell phones and computers themselves are not to blame for cyberbullying. Social media sites can be used for positive activities, like connecting kids with friends and family, helping students with school, and for entertainment. But these tools can also be used to hurt other people. Whether done in person or through technology, the effects of bullying are similar. Kids who are cyberbullied are more likely to: Use alcohol and drugs Skip school Experience in-person bullying Be unwilling to attend school Receive poor grades Have lower self-esteem Have more health problems

20 F REQUENCY OF CYBERBULLYING 6% of students in grades 6–12 experienced cyberbullying. (2008–2009 National Center for Education Statistics and Bureau of Justice Statistics) The 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey finds that 16% of high school students (grades 9-12) were electronically bullied in the past year. Technology use changes rapidly making it is difficult to design surveys that accurately capture trends.

21 What's the last thing someone told you that really changed you?

22 Y OUR T URN What types of bullying do you see in your school? In your community? Are they different and does it matter?

23 B ULLYING AND S UICIDE Take A Stand: Bullying and what you can do about it

24 S UICIDE : B EHAVIORAL W ARNING S IGNS  Direct statements about their intention to end their lives, or less direct comments about lack of hope  Preoccupation with death or related themes  Sudden changes in behavior – withdrawing/pulling away from others or expressing relief/calm  Somatic complaints – persistent physical complaints in the absence of a medical cause  Any type of “final preparation” – giving away personal items

25 S UICIDE R ISK F ACTORS  Previous suicide attempts – in 4 out of 5 completed suicides the person had made a prior suicide attempt  Mental health issues – as high as 90% of those who have attempted suicide suffer from mental illness  Substance Abuse  Family instability/conflict  Exposure to violence or abuse  Authority problems

26 P ROTECTIVE F ACTORS The following is a list of protective factors that can help reduce the risk of suicide:  Family stability  Problem solving skills  A sense of self-worth  Connection to school, groups, activities  Academic success  Relationship with peers  Seeks help from adults  Religion and spirituality

27 Is there an act of bravery that you see every day, but goes unnoticed?

28 I S IT SUCH A BIG DEAL ? Take A Stand: Bullying and what you can do about it

29 I S IT REALLY A PROBLEM ? In a survey more eight to fifteen year-olds picked teasing and bullying as "big problems" than those who picked drugs or alcohol, racism, AIDS, or pressure to have sex. More African Americans saw bullying as a big problem for people their age than those who identified racism as a big problem (Kaiser Family Foundation, 2001).

30 I S IT REALLY A PROBLEM ? Students age 9-13 have an "omnipresent fear of physical violence and name-calling" Prevailing view among students that schools "don't get it" when it comes to verbal and emotional bullying, instead simply focusing on physical bullying. (Widmeyer Communications, 2003).

31 I S IT REALLY A PROBLEM ? Students report that it is not worth the effort to tell an adult about bullying because bullies are rarely punished severely enough to deter them from future bullying. Students describe "unsympathetic and apathetic teachers and principals" who are "difficult to motivate to take action" and "weak and ineffective penalties and punishments for bullies that allows bullying to flourish" (Widmeyer Communications, 2003).

32 T HINGS STUDENTS WISH TEACHERS KNEW ABOUT BULLYING 1. Take the issue of name-calling and teasing seriously. 2. Name calling is bullying. 3. Don’t harp on what should have been done in the past; focus on the present. Saying, “Why didn’t you tell me sooner?” is not helpful. 4. Let students know that you are available to talk to them. 5. If students see you gossiping or other bullying behaviors toward students, their families or colleagues, they will interpret it as permission to behave similarly. 6. Do not belittle, tear down or publicly embarrass students.

33 T HINGS STUDENTS WISH TEACHERS KNEW ABOUT BULLYING 6. Do not downplay what a student says he or she is feeling or experiencing. 8. Be discreet and whenever possible, maintain confidentiality. Some teachers announce to the class when a student is having a problem with name- calling, bullying or harassment. 9. Be proa c tive. Discuss name-calling and bullying and school policies that outline how these situations will be handled. 10. Take time to listen. Don’t try to “fix” a situation before you have taken time to listen carefully.

34 Y OUR T URN You decide. Is it really a problem? What do you want teachers to know about bullying?

35 B ULLING B EHAVIORS C AN BE S TOPPED Strength in numbers……

36 H EY B YSTANDERS ….T AKE A STAND Most Washington state adolescents (57 percent) would not take action if they witnessed another students being bullied or teased. While between 36 percent (6th graders) to 46 percent (12th graders) of these students said that they would "tell that kid to stop," between one-third and one- fourth of 8th, 10th, and 12th graders said they would "walk away" or "mind their own business.“ A full 20 percent indicated that they would "stay and watch" (Smyser & Reis, 2002).

37 H EY B YSTANDERS ….T AKE A STAND Research has found that only between 4 and 13 percent of middle and high school youth indicated that they would report an incident of bullying to a teacher, administrator, or another school staff member (Bulach et al., 2000; Harris, 2004; Harris et al., 2002; Shakeshaft et al., 1997).

38 Thank someone for something they did that helped make you kinder or braver.

39 B ULLYING AND W HAT YOU C AN D O A BOUT I T TAKE A STAND

40 A WARENESS IS K EY !  The problem of bullying is not new—the outcomes are more complex  Bullying does not cause suicide, but it may make vulnerable youth more at risk and may become a triggering event for suicide attempts  If you are aware of bullying that is occurring or are concerned for someone’s safety, speak up and ask for help

41 W HAT CAN YOU DO ? Don’t Blame the Target!  Individuals that are the target of bullying behaviors are already blaming themselves for what is happening to them and often believe they deserve to be bullied or that it is their own fault  Minimizing or brushing it off as part of life can increase feelings of hopelessness and helplessness  However, we should help them to look at their own behavior to see if there is something that they could do to help the situation & strengthen their sense of well-being

42 H OW TO HELP THE PERSON BEING TARGETED :  Connectedness - belonging to a peer group  Hobbies/Interests  Relationships Building  Journaling  Positive Thinking  Goal Setting  Daily Routine/Self Care

43 S TRATEGIES TO HELP THE S ITUATION :  Be with others (connectedness)  Walk with awareness/confidence  Walk away/ignore it  Avoid places/people/situations  Ask the person to stop  Protect yourself  Adult awareness and involvement  Model appropriate behaviors  Keep a record

44 Y OUR L IFE I OWA Iowa’s Suicide and Prevention Service A resource for students, parents, and teachers

45 Y OUR L IFE I OWA S UPPORT I am proud to announce the launch of a new bullying and suicide prevention resource – Your Life Iowa. This hotline and website, funded by the Iowa Department of Public Health in partnership with Boys Town, the Iowa Youth Advisory Committee and the Iowa Department of Education, will provide help to Iowans 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Every student should know that if they report being bullied, adults will take them seriously and that other students will stand up for them in a nonviolent way. Governor Terry E. Branstad Remarks to the Governor’s Bullying Prevention Summit November 27, 2012

46 W HAT IS Y OUR L IFE I OWA ? Anti-bullying and youth suicide prevention service for the state of Iowa Support, information and resources to students, parents and professionals; 24/7 Hotline Text Messaging Service Website

47 Y OUR L IFE I OWA S ERVICES Hotline   Trained Crisis Counselors available 24/7 Texting  Text TALK to  Text Services available from 4-8pm, 7 days a week Website   Resources for adults and students  Online chat services

48 Y OUR T URN What is the key to really addressing bullying?

49 N OW TIME FOR A PEP TALK

50 T HIS W AY, T OWARDS B RAVERY W HERE Y OUTH A RE E MPOWERED. T HIS W AY, T OWARDS A CCEPTANCE W HERE H UMANITY IS E MBRACED. T HIS W AY, T OWARDS L OVE W HERE I NDIVIDUALITY IS E NCOURAGED.

51 It starts with you….

52 D ON ’ T L OSE H OPE …. 2ea86ae/Don't%20Lose%20Hope

53 feature=player_embedded


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