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Unit 5: Part A Prison Studies 21st Century College English: Book 4.

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2 Unit 5: Part A Prison Studies 21st Century College English: Book 4

3 Pre-Reading Activities Pre-Reading ActivitiesPre-Reading ActivitiesPre-Reading Activities Text A: Language Points Text A: Language PointsText A: Language PointsText A: Language Points Exercises ExercisesExercises Assignment AssignmentAssignment Unit 5: Part A Prison studies

4 Pre-Reading Activities Preview PreviewPreview Pre-Reading Listening Pre-Reading ListeningPre-Reading ListeningPre-Reading Listening

5 Reading can be so many things:work or joy, reality or escape, obligation or opportunity. In this unit, three very different authors reflect on how the act of reading has profoundly changed their lives for the better. In Text A, political activist Malcolm X remembers how his “ Prison Studies ” gave him a truly deep love of learning and a better opportunity to develop intellectually than any school could have. Text B, “ reading for life ”, discuss the many benefits of reading, from simple pleasure to helping one make the most of one ’ s career opportunities. Finally, in “ Moon on a Silver Spoon “, Eudora Welty describes the intense childhood love of books, language, storytelling that would lead her to become one of the most noted writers of America south. Pre-Reading Activities Preview

6 Before listening to the tape, have a quick look at the following words. Then listen to the tape again and answer the following questions. dropout 退学生 deal 待遇 Pre-reading Activities Check-up

7 1.Which of the following is true of Malcolm X’s education? A)He had a degree from a good college. B)He left school at an early age. C)He did not attend school because he was criminal. D)He wishes he could have gone to college instead of prison. 1.Which of the following is true of Malcolm X’s education? A)He had a degree from a good college. B)He left school at an early age. C)He did not attend school because he was criminal. D)He wishes he could have gone to college instead of prison. Pre-reading Activities

8 2.What was Malcolm X’s motivation to educate himself in prison? A)To be able to converse and debate well. B)To impress the prison authorities. C)To help other black Americans. D)To get a better job when he got out. 2.What was Malcolm X’s motivation to educate himself in prison? A)To be able to converse and debate well. B)To impress the prison authorities. C)To help other black Americans. D)To get a better job when he got out. Pre-reading Activities

9 3.How did Malcolm X begin to study? A)By reading books he knew from high school B)By talking and debating with other prisoners C)By copying the dictionary manually D)By taking a course called “ Prison Studies. ” Pre-reading Activities 3.How did Malcolm X begin to study? A)By reading books he knew from high school B)By talking and debating with other prisoners C)By copying the dictionary manually D)By taking a course called “ Prison Studies. ”

10 4.Which of the following best expresses Malcolm X’s attitude towards reading? A)He liked it because he learned many important facts. B)He loved it because it made him more knowledgeable and mentally alive. C)He saw it as a tool to advance himself in society. D)He found it difficult because his language skills “ were a mess. ”. Pre-reading Activities 4.Which of the following best expresses Malcolm X’s attitude towards reading? A)He liked it because he learned many important facts. B)He loved it because it made him more knowledgeable and mentally alive. C)He saw it as a tool to advance himself in society. D)He found it difficult because his language skills “ were a mess. ”. Script

11 Pre-reading Activities People who hear one of my lectures or see me on television often think that I must have a degree from a good college. They’d never guess that I left school when I was 14 years old. This impression is entirely due to my prison studies. When I came to jail, my language skills were a mess. I seemed every bit the junior high school dropout I was. But I was impressed by those prisoners who could converse and debate effectively. I wanted to be like them, but I lacked the reading ability to develop my range of knowledge. I decided to improve myself by studying the dictionary. I was so hungry to learn that I copied that entire dictionary over in my own hand. It was long, hard work, but by the end I could read and, for the first time, really understand what I read. And that opened up a whole new world for me. From that moment on, I read every free minute I had. I became the prison library’s number one customer. And once I found my way into the world of books, even the prison walls couldn’t really keep me from being free. Reading taught me what it means to be mentally alive, and once I gained that knowledge I could never lose it. And with every book I read, I understood more deeply the need to awaken other black Americans to the bad deal we’d been getting in the United States. I don’t think anyone ever beneficial more from prison than I did. In fact, I think I learned much more there than I could have if I had gone to college. Where else could I be able to attack my ignorance by studying as much as 15 hours per day.

12 Language Points Prison Studies Text A:

13 Prison Studies Malcolm X Malcolm X 1Many who today hear me somewhere in person, or on television, or those who read something I’ve said, will think I went to school far beyond the eighth grade. This impression is due entirely to my prison studies. Many who today hear me somewhere in person, or on television, or those who read something I’ve said, will think I went to school far beyond the eighth gradeMany who today hear me somewhere in person, or on television, or those who read something I’ve said, will think I went to school far beyond the eighth grade Language Points

14 2 It had really begun back in the Charlestown Prison, when Bimbi first made me feel envy of his stock of knowledge. Bimbi had always taken charge of any conversation he was in, and I had tried to emulate him. But every book I picked up had few sentences which didn’t contain anywhere from one to nearly all of the words that might as well have been in Chinese. When I just skipped those words, of course, I really ended up with little idea of what the book said. So I had come to the Norfolk Prison Colony still going through only book-reading motions. Pretty soon, I would have quit even these motions, unless I had received the motivation that I did. taken charge of But every book I picked up had few sentences which didn’t contain anywhere from one to nearly all of the words that might as well have been in Chinesegoing through only book-reading motionsPretty soon, I would have quit even these motions, unless I had received the motivation that I didtaken charge of But every book I picked up had few sentences which didn’t contain anywhere from one to nearly all of the words that might as well have been in Chinesegoing through only book-reading motionsPretty soon, I would have quit even these motions, unless I had received the motivation that I did Language Points

15 3 I saw that the best thing I could do was get hold of a dictionary — to study, to learn some words. I was lucky enough to reason also that I should try to improve my penmanship. It was sad. I couldn’t even write in a straight line. It was both ideas together that moved me to request a dictionary along with some tablets and pencils from the Norfolk Prison Colony school. get hold of reasonget hold of reason 4 I spent two days just thumbing uncertainly through the dictionary’s pages. I’ve never realized so many words existed! I didn’t know which words I needed to learn. Finally, to start some kind of action, I began copying. thumbing uncertainly through the dictionary’s pagesthumbing uncertainly through the dictionary’s pages Language Points

16 5 In my slow, painstaking, ragged handwriting, I copied into my tablet everything printed on that first page, down to the punctuation marks. down todown to 6 I believe it took me a day. Then, aloud, I read back, to myself, everything I’ve written on the tablet. Over and over, aloud, to myself, I read my own handwriting. Language Points

17 7 I woke up the next morning, thinking about those words — immensely proud to realize that not only had I written so much at one time, but I’ve written words that I never knew were in the world. Moreover, with a little effort, I also could remember what many of these words meant. I reviewed the words whose meanings I didn’t remember. Funny thing, from the dictionary’s first page right now, that “aardvark” springs to my mind. The dictionary had a picture of it, a long-tailed, long-eared, burrowing African mammal, which lives off termites caught by sticking out its tongue as an anteater does for ants. springs tolives offsprings tolives off Language Points

18 8 I was so fascinated that I went on — I copied the dictionary’s next page. And the same experience came when I studied that. With every succeeding page, I also learned of people and places and events from history. Actually the dictionary is like a miniature encyclopedia. Finally the dictionary’s A section had filled a whole tablet — and I went on into the B’s. That was the way I started copying what eventually became the entire dictionary. I went a lot faster after so much practice helped me to pick up handwriting speed. Between what I wrote in my tablet, and writing letters, during the rest of my time in prison I would guess I wrote a million words. pick up handwriting speedBetweenpick up handwriting speedBetween Language Points

19 9 I suppose it was inevitable that as my word-base broadened, I could for the first time pick up a book and read and now begin to understand what the book was saying. Anyone who has read a great deal can imagine the new world that opened. Let me tell you something; from then until I left that prison, in every free moment I had, if I was not reading in the library, I was reading on my bunk. You couldn’t have got me out of books with a wedge. Between Mr. Muhammad’s teachings, my correspondence, my visitors, and my reading of books, months passed without my even thinking about being imprisoned. In fact, up to then, I never had been so truly free in my life... You couldn’t have got me out of books with a wedge You couldn’t have got me out of books with a wedge Language Points

20 10 As you can imagine, especially in a prison where there was heavy emphasis on rehabilitation, an inmate was smiled upon if he demonstrated an unusually intense interest in books. There was a sizable number of well-read inmates, especially the popular debaters. Some were said by many to be practically walking encyclopedias. They were almost celebrities. No university would ask any student to devour literature as I did when this new world opened to me, of being able to read and understand. smiled uponwalking encyclopediassmiled uponwalking encyclopedias Language Points

21 11 I read more in my room than in the library itself. An inmate who was known to read a lot could check out more than the permitted maximum number of books. I preferred reading in the total isolation of my own room. 12 When I had progressed to really serious reading, every night at about ten p.m. I would be outraged with the “lights out.” It always seemed to catch me right in the middle of something engrossing. in the middle of something engrossingin the middle of something engrossing Language Points

22 13 Fortunately, right outside my door was a corridor light that cast a glow into my room. The glow was enough to read by, once my eyes adjusted to it. So when “lights out” came, I would sit on the floor where I could continue reading in that glow. 14 At one-hour intervals the night guards paced past every room. Each time I heard the approaching footsteps, I jumped into bed and feigned sleep. And as soon as the guard passed, I got back out of bed onto the floor area of that light-glow, where I would read for another fifty-eight minutes — until the guard approached again. That went on until three or four every morning. Three or four hours of sleep a night was enough for me. Often in the years in the streets I had slept less than that. feigned sleep feigned sleep Language Points

23 15 I have often reflected upon the new vistas that reading opened to me. I knew right there in prison that reading had changed forever the course of my life. As I see it today, the ability to read awoke inside me some long dormant craving to be mentally alive. I certainly wasn’t seeking any degree, the way a college confers a status symbol upon its students. My homemade education gave me, with every additional book that I read, a little bit more sensitivity to the deafness, dumbness, and blindness that was afflicting the black race in America. Not long ago, an English writer telephoned me from London, asking questions. One was, “What’s your alma mater?” I told him, “Books.” You will never catch me with a free fifteen minutes in which I’m not studying something I feel might be able to help the black man... reflected uponconfersreflected uponconfers Language Points

24 16 Every time I catch a plane, I have with me a book that I want to read — and that’s a lot of books these days. If I weren’t out here every day battling the white man, I could spend the rest of my life reading, just satisfying my curiosity — because you can hardly mention anything I’m not curious about. I don’t think anybody ever got more out of going to prison than I did. In fact, prison enabled me to study far more intensively than I would have if my life had gone differently and I had attended some college. I imagine that one of the biggest troubles with colleges is there are too many distractions. Where else but in prison could I have attacked my ignorance by being able to study intensely sometimes as much as fifteen hours a day? (1258 words) got more out of got more out of Language Points

25 Malcolm X US black leader Malcolm X, born Malcolm Little, changed his surname, in common with other Black Muslims, in favor of “X”, a sign indicating the lost tribal names that had been taken from ancestors on their capture and transportation to America as slaves. As an articulate speaker, he expressed the rage and anger of the “oppressed” black masses in America. He become a leading spokesman for the Black Muhammad, for a controversial speech delivered after the assassinations of President Kennedy. In 1964 after conversion to orthodox Islam, he preached a brotherhood between black and white, and formed the organization of Afro-American Unity. He was assassinated in Text-related information

26 Many who today hear me somewhere in person, or on television,... will think that I went to school far beyond the eighth grade. Paraphrase: —Many people who are actually present at my speeches somewhere or hear them on television these days... will think that I have got much more education than just eight years’ schooling. More to learn More to learn

27 in person — in one’s physical presence; personally Examples: I had seen her before on TV, but she looked very different when I met her in person. I had seen her before on TV, but she looked very different when I met her in person. They talk a lot to one another, over the telephone and in person. They talk a lot to one another, over the telephone and in person.

28 take charge of —take control of ; become responsible for Examples: The boss asked him to take charge of the office for a few days when she was away.The boss asked him to take charge of the office for a few days when she was away. They advertised for a nurse to take sole charge of their children while they were at work.They advertised for a nurse to take sole charge of their children while they were at work.

29 But every book I picked up had few sentences which didn’t contain anywhere from one to nearly all of the words that might as well have been in Chinese. Paraphrase: —But every book I took up was full of sentences which contained one or almost all of the words which were completely unknown to me. More to learn More to learn

30 anywhere —a point (e.g. an amount) within a stated range when you do not know what exactly the point is. Examples: You could expect to be paid anywhere between $7and $15 an hour.You could expect to be paid anywhere between $7and $15 an hour. He could get anywhere from three to seven years’ imprisonment.He could get anywhere from three to seven years’ imprisonment.

31 go through motions —pretend to do something by making the movements associated with the particular action Examples: The actor went through the motions of putting imaginary noodles into his mouth.The actor went through the motions of putting imaginary noodles into his mouth. He caught my eye and went through the motions of sympathetically clapping.He caught my eye and went through the motions of sympathetically clapping.

32 Pretty soon, I would have quit even these motions, unless I had received the motivation that I did. Paraphrase: —Before long I would have stopped even that reading without understanding, if I had not been inspired by a desire to read.

33 get hold of —take in the hands; manage to find Examples: I threw him the rope and he got hold of it.I threw him the rope and he got hold of it. Where can I get hold of some stamps?Where can I get hold of some stamps?

34 reason — vt. make decision or judgement by thinking carefully about all the facts Examples: You should reason out a conclusion.You should reason out a conclusion. He reason out the answer to a question.He reason out the answer to a question.

35 thumbing uncertainly through the dictionary ’ s pages —turn the dictionary’s pages quickly and casually Example: He is thumbing the pages of a book.He is thumbing the pages of a book.

36 down to —including even Examples: she could describe what the other women in the room are wearing, down to the color of their stockings.she could describe what the other women in the room are wearing, down to the color of their stockings. Nobody was free suspicion, from the head boy down to the youngest pupil.Nobody was free suspicion, from the head boy down to the youngest pupil.

37 spring to / into —start or come into existence very quickly and suddenly Examples: Say the word “Australia” and the vision of beaches and blue seas immediately springs to my mind.Say the word “Australia” and the vision of beaches and blue seas immediately springs to my mind. A computer will not spring into action without something powering it.A computer will not spring into action without something powering it.

38 live off ( a particular kind of food) —live by eating the only kind of food Examples: These animals with long necks live off the leaves of tall trees.These animals with long necks live off the leaves of tall trees. We lived off fruit for a week.We lived off fruit for a week.

39 pick up handwriting speed —write more quickly Examples: The train picked up speed.The train picked up speed. Let’s see how fast you can speed up from a standing start.Let’s see how fast you can speed up from a standing start.

40 between —here indicates a period of time from one event to another Examples: Between conception and biological birthBetween conception and biological birth There was a gulf of ten years between him and his youngest sister.There was a gulf of ten years between him and his youngest sister.

41 You couldn’t have gotten me out of books with a wedge. —you could never have forced me away from book. Examples: You can’t get her out of it.You can’t get her out of it. The police got the truth out of him.The police got the truth out of him.

42 smile on / upon sb./ sth. —approve or encourage sb. / sth. Examples: The government began to smile on small businesses when it realized that they were the key to economic growth.The government began to smile on small businesses when it realized that they were the key to economic growth. Fortune has smiled upon us (i.e.We are successful) today.Fortune has smiled upon us (i.e.We are successful) today.

43 a walking encyclopedia —a very informative person Examples: A walking dictionaryA walking dictionary She’s a walking history book.She’s a walking history book.

44 feign sleep —pretend to be asleep Examples: Everyone feigned surprise when he told how old he was.Everyone feigned surprise when he told how old he was. I don’t want to go tonight — I shall feign illness. I don’t want to go tonight — I shall feign illness.

45 in the middle of doing something —be busy doing it and do not want to be interrupted Examples: I was in the middle of washing up when the telephone rang.I was in the middle of washing up when the telephone rang. He’s in the middle of planning his departmental budget. He’s in the middle of planning his departmental budget.

46 reflect upon /on —think deeply about; consider carefully Examples: I reflected on all that he had said to me.I reflected on all that he had said to me. The manager demanded time to reflect upon what to do next.The manager demanded time to reflect upon what to do next.

47 confer —give Examples: Degrees are conferred in July and December.Degrees are conferred in July and December. The honor was conferred on(or upon) him just after the war.The honor was conferred on(or upon) him just after the war.

48 get sth. out of —gain or obtain sth. from Examples: I never get much out of his lecture.I never get much out of his lecture. She seems to get a lot out of life.She seems to get a lot out of life.

49 Unit 5 Exercises Ex. II Comprehension Ex. II Comprehension Ex. III & Ex. IV Vocabulary Ex. III & Ex. IV Vocabulary Part 2.2 Listening Part 2.2 Listening Exercises

50 Exercises Comprehension Ex. II, p. 132 《读写教程 IV 》 : Ex. II, p. 132

51 1.When did Malcolm X leave school? 2.Who was Bimbi? How did he impress Malcolm X? Answer the following questions: He left school after the eighth grade. Bimbi was a fellow inmate. He impressed Malcolm as a knowledgeable person. Exercises Comprehension

52 3.Why did Malcolm X ask for a dictionary, tablets, and pencils from the prison school? 4.Did Malcolm X recognize many words when he read the dictionary for the first time? Because he wanted to learn some words and improve his penmanship at the same time. No, he didn’t. Exercises Comprehension

53 5.How long did it take Malcolm X to copy the first page of the dictionary? 6.What did Malcolm X do to the words he had copied down? It took him a day. He tried to memorize their meanings and review them the next day. Exercises Comprehension

54 7.Why did Malcolm X compare the dictionary to a miniature encyclopedia? 8.When did Malcolm X start “reading” in the real sense of the word? Because he learned from the dictionary not only words, but also people, places and historical events. He started reading when his word-base was broadened. Exercises Comprehension

55 9.What was the prison authorities’ attitude towards book- loving prisoners? 10.Did the author feel happy with the “lights out”? Why or why not? The prison authorities gave book-lovers such favorable treatments as allowing them to borrow more books form the library. No. He was angry because the “lights out” often interrupted his reading. Exercises Comprehension

56 11.What did Malcolm X mean by saying that books were his alma mater? 12.According to Malcolm X, which is a better place for him to study in, a prison or a college? Why? To him books were his school. A prison was a better place to study in because it had fewer distractions. Exercises Comprehension

57 Ex. IV, p. 133 《读写教程 IV 》 : Ex. IV, p. 133 Exercises Vocabulary

58 1. For the first artificial intelligence ( 人工智能 ) conference in 1956 inspired researchers to undertake projects that ________ human behavior in areas of reasoning, language comprehension, and communications. afflictcraving emulateignorance inevitableminiatureoutragespractically maximumintenserequestsizable succeedingintervalcorrespondence Exercises Vocabulary IV.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. emulated

59 2. In 1979 the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states may require the consent of one parent of a minor( 未成年 者 )____________an abortion. Exercises Vocabulary requesting afflictcraving emulateignorance inevitableminiatureoutragespractically maximumintenserequestsizable succeedingintervalcorrespondence IV.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. afflictcraving emulateignorance inevitableminiatureoutragespractically maximumintenserequestsizable succeedingintervalcorrespondence IV.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary.

60 3. By 1951 industrial production has exceeded prewar peaks; it continued to rise in the __________ years. Exercises Vocabulary succeeding afflictcraving emulateignorance inevitableminiatureoutragespractically maximumintenserequestsizable succeedingintervalcorrespondence IV.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. 4. That park contains____________ reproductions of such famous sights in China as the Great Wall and the Summer Palace. miniature

61 5. According to our professor, unemployment is an ___________ consequence of free market economics. Exercises Vocabulary inevitable afflictcraving emulateignorance inevitableminiatureoutragespractically maximumintenserequestsizable succeedingintervalcorrespondence IV.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. 6. There are nearly 2,900 radio stations associated with ABC, as well as a __________ publishing group. sizable

62 7. Don ’ t worry. The danger from these snake is__________ nothing. Exercises Vocabulary practically afflictcraving emulateignorance inevitableminiatureoutragespractically maximumintenserequestsizable succeedingintervalcorrespondence IV.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. 8. A crowd of people gathered, ___________ by the way the police officers were hitting the two men. outraged

63 9. Psychological drug dependency is characterized by a ________ for the drug and belief that one cannot function without taking it. Exercises Vocabulary craving afflictcraving emulateignorance inevitableminiatureoutragespractically maximumintenserequestsizable succeedingintervalcorrespondence IV.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. 10. The bomb was designed to cause the_________ amount of harm to the ________ number of people. maximum maximum

64 11. Although breast cancer primarily_________ females, about 1,400 male breast cancers were also reported in the United States in Exercises Vocabulary afflicts afflictcraving emulateignorance inevitableminiatureoutragespractically maximumintenserequestsizable succeedingintervalcorrespondence IV.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. 12. Some people ’ s attitudes towards foreigners are based on sheer ___________ and prejudice. ignorance

65 13. When he stood up from his seat, he suddenly felt an _________ pain in the lower part of his back. Exercises Vocabulary intense afflictcraving emulateignorance inevitableminiatureoutragespractically maximumintenserequestsizable succeedingintervalcorrespondence IV.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary. 14. We see each other at regular _________ ---usually once a week. intervals

66 15. According I read a very interesting biography of Marx ’ s last week, which is based on his _________________ with Engels over 40 years. Exercises Vocabulary correspondence afflictcraving emulateignorance inevitableminiatureoutragespractically maximumintenserequestsizable succeedingintervalcorrespondence IV.Fill in the blanks with the words given below. Change the form where necessary.

67 Ex. V, p. 133 《读写教程 IV 》 : Ex. V, p. 133 Exercises Vocabulary

68 IV.Replace the underlined words or expressions in the following sentences with phrases or expression from the text that best keep the original meaning. Exercises Vocabulary 1. Tom ’ s boss asked him to take control of the office for a couple of weeks while she was away.  Tom’s boss asked him to take charge of the office for a couple of weeks while she was away.

69 IV.Replace the underlined words or expressions in the following sentences with phrases or expression from the text that best keep the original meaning. Exercises Vocabulary 2. As he fell down from the cliff ( 悬崖 ) the mountaineer was lucky enough to grab a branch with his left hand.  As he fell down from the cliff ( 悬崖 ) the mountaineer was lucky enough to get hold of a branch with his left hand.

70 IV.Replace the underlined words or expressions in the following sentences with phrases or expression from the text that best keep the original meaning. Exercises Vocabulary 3. Such projects as road or dam building, mining, or large- scale farming can cause great hardships to people whose lives depend on the land.  Such projects as road or dam building, mining, or large- scale farming can cause great hardships to people who live off on the land.

71 IV.Replace the underlined words or expressions in the following sentences with phrases or expression from the text that best keep the original meaning. Exercises Vocabulary 4. The government began to support small businesses when it realized that they were the key to economic growth.  The government began to smile (up)on small businesses when it realized that they were the key to economic growth.

72 IV.Replace the underlined words or expressions in the following sentences with phrases or expression from the text that best keep the original meaning. Exercises Vocabulary 5. Adrenaline( 肾上腺素 ) helps the body to get used to sudden stress by increasing heart rate and raising blood pressure.  Adrenaline( 肾上腺素 ) helps the body to adjust to sudden stress by increasing heart rate and raising blood pressure.

73 IV.Replace the underlined words or expressions in the following sentences with phrases or expression from the text that best keep the original meaning. Exercises Vocabulary 6. A central purpose of drama has always been to provide a means for a society to think carefully about itself and its beliefs.  A central purpose of drama has always been to provide a means for a society to reflect upon itself and its beliefs.

74 IV.Replace the underlined words or expressions in the following sentences with phrases or expression from the text that best keep the original meaning. Exercises Vocabulary 7. I had seen the singer before on TV, but she looked very different when I met her personally.  I had seen the singer before on TV, but she looked very different when I met her in person.

75 IV.Replace the underlined words or expressions in the following sentences with phrases or expression from the text that best keep the original meaning. Exercises Vocabulary 8. Chicago ’ s O ’ Hare Airport was closed as a result of the snowstorm.  Chicago ’ s O ’ Hare Airport was closed due to the snowstorm.

76 IV.Replace the underlined words or expressions in the following sentences with phrases or expression from the text that best keep the original meaning. Exercises Vocabulary 9. Cindy, Linda, Niaomi, Claudia, and Christy are known as the “ supermodels ” of the 1990 ’ s.  Cindy, Linda, Niaomi, Claudia, along with Christy are known as the “ supermodels ” of the 1990 ’ s.

77 IV.Replace the underlined words or expressions in the following sentences with phrases or expression from the text that best keep the original meaning. Exercises Vocabulary 10. The rocket roared into space, increasing its speed to 38,000 mph shortly after.  The rocket roared into space, picking up its speed to 38,000 mph shortly after.

78 IV.Replace the underlined words or expressions in the following sentences with phrases or expression from the text that best keep the original meaning. Exercises Vocabulary 11. I ’ m sorry, but someone else has borrowed the book you want.  I’m sorry, but someone else has checked out the book you want.

79 IV.Replace the underlined words or expressions in the following sentences with phrases or expression from the text that best keep the original meaning. Exercises Vocabulary 12. On seeing General Powell, the soldier threw out his chest and saluted.  On seeing General Powell, the soldier stuck out his chest and saluted.

80 Listening 《听说教程 IV 》 Part 2.2, p. 52

81 Listening Check-up Directions:Listen to the following conversation twice and fill in the missing parts. Then listen to it for the third time and answer the questions. Answering the following question before listening to the conversation 1.Which do you prefer, reading or watching TV? 2.Does watching TV encourage people to read or result in lower reading standards? 3.In what ways watching TV is different from reading?

82 ( A and B are young married couple. A = husband; B = wife) A: Feel like 1)___________________ B:Not right now – I am at 2)____________________________. A: [signing] Okay. I guess I ’ ll see what ’ s on TV. B:TV again! A:So? What ’ s wrong with watching TV? B:TV gives you 3)_____________. If you read a good book once in a while, it might 4)_________________. A:Oh yeah? B:Yeah! [loftily] Reading 5)____________________ and let you experience things you ’ d never experience otherwise. A: So does TV. B: Well, but it isn ’ t the same. Books stimulates your imagination. Listening going out for a walk? a really exciting part of this book brain damage improve your mind expands your horizons

83 A:Right – you imagine you ’ re doing something thrilling and important, when I fact you ’ re just lying there on your stomach turning pieces of paper. B:But – but – but reading is thrilling and important! 6)__________________________________________________ A:You talk as if every book in the world were a masterpiece. What ’ s that you ’ re reading now – Hollywood Husbands !? Now that sounds like a brilliant work of art. B:[sulkily] Yeah, well – I still say reading is better than watching television. A:Oh, what difference does it make anyway? Reading, TV – 7)________________________________________ Are you sure you don ’ t want to go out for a walk? Listening Questions The world’s culture and civilization is preserved in books. They’re both just ways to escape from real life.

84 Answer the following questions 1.What does the husband suggest ? 2.What is the wife doing? 3.What does the wife think of the TV? 4.What does the wife think of books? 5.What does the husband think of TV? 6.In what way does the husband think watching TV and reading are the same? Script Listening

85 Listening A: Feel like going out for a walk? B:Not right now — I am at a really exciting part of this book. A: [signing] Okay. I guess I ’ ll see what ’ s on TV. B:TV again! A:So? What ’ s wrong with watching TV? B:TV gives you brain damage. If you read a good book once in a while, it might improve your mind. A:Oh yeah? B:Yeah! [loftily] Reading expands your horizons and let you experience things you ’ d never experience otherwise. A: So does TV. B: Well, but it isn ’ t the same. Books stimulates your imagination. A:Right — you imagine you ’ re doing something thrilling and important, when in fact you ’ re just lying there on your stomach turning pieces of paper. B:But... but... but reading is thrilling and important! The world ’ s culture and civilization is preserved in books. A:You talk as if every book in the world were a masterpiece. What ’ s that you ’ re reading now — Hollywood Husbands!? Now that sounds like a brilliant work of art. B:[sulkily] Yeah, well — I still say reading is better than watching television. A:Oh, what difference does it make anyway? Reading, TV — they are both just ways to escape from real life. Are you sure you don ’ t want to go out for a walk?

86 1.Review Text A 2.Do exercises: Structure (Ex. VII&VIII&IX, p. 135) Structure (Ex. VII&VIII&IX, p. 135) Cloze (Ex. X, p. 136) Cloze (Ex. X, p. 136) Translation ( Ex. XI& XII, p. 136,137) Translation ( Ex. XI& XII, p. 136,137) 3.Structured Writing (Ex.XIV, p. 137) AssignmentAssignment


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