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State of the World Chapter 2. Rethinking the Global Meat Industry  Intro  The Jungle Revisited  The Disassembly Line  Appetite for Destruction  Happier.

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Presentation on theme: "State of the World Chapter 2. Rethinking the Global Meat Industry  Intro  The Jungle Revisited  The Disassembly Line  Appetite for Destruction  Happier."— Presentation transcript:

1 State of the World Chapter 2

2 Rethinking the Global Meat Industry  Intro  The Jungle Revisited  The Disassembly Line  Appetite for Destruction  Happier Meals  Conclusion

3 Intro  Industrial animal production (Factory Farming) is taking over the smaller family owned operations, and becoming the norm for food productions around the world.  Almost 2 billion people around the world rely on livestock to meet part or all of their daily needs.  The number of four-footed livestock has increased 38% since  As the numbers of livestock grow, our relationship with their meat and production of the meat also grows.

4 The Jungle Revisited  Global meat production has increased more than fivefold since the 1950’s, and more than doubled since the 1970’s.  Pork accounts for a majority of the meat production worldwide.  Meat consumption is rising faster in the developing countries than in Europe or the United States. see box 2-1  With large factory farms controlling the majority of the world markets many of Upton Sinclair’s complaints about sanitary practices and production have actual worsened as production of meat has moved overseas to countries with less stringent guidelines.

5 The Disassembly Line  For many of us when we eat meat all that we see is a finished product. It is difficult for us to think about the means that which the meat was processed.  With production costs rising in the processing of meat the conditions for the slaughter and raising of these animals has dwindled.  Along these lines the turnover rate for workers in this field is also high due to the long number of hours, low pay, and physical injuries incurred.

6 Appetite for Destruction  More crops (corn and grain) must be grown to supply food for the growing livestock population.  With the number of livestock growing every year so does their need for water. The U.N. estimates that 2,000-15,000 liters of water are used per live-weight ton of slaughtered animal in the U.S.  The production of livestock also creates a waste problem that can leave to water contamination.

7 Spreading Disease  With meat being a globalized product and the high risk of contamination live cattle and other four footed animals carry with them the possibility of carrying diseases from other countries.  In the factory environment, disease can spread easily from livestock to people.  The avian flu virus combined with the pig flu virus has morphed into a new stain of diseases.  To help prevent the spread of cross contamination, use of antibiotics and separation of different species of animals is being practiced.

8 Happier Meals  Canada has created a genetically engineered pig that produces less-noxious manure.  Some farmers are attempting to make an effort to produce healthier more environmentally friendly meat products.  The government is also trying to ensure that there are no animals coming into this country that may poses any type of disease.


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