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Source: Astin, Helen S. and Alexander W. Astin. A Social Change Model of Leadership Development Guidebook Version III. The National Clearinghouse of Leadership.

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Presentation on theme: "Source: Astin, Helen S. and Alexander W. Astin. A Social Change Model of Leadership Development Guidebook Version III. The National Clearinghouse of Leadership."— Presentation transcript:

1 Source: Astin, Helen S. and Alexander W. Astin. A Social Change Model of Leadership Development Guidebook Version III. The National Clearinghouse of Leadership Programs, Compiled by: Timothy Rodriguez, 2010

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3 Leadership is viewed as a process rather than as a position.

4 The model explicitly promotes the values of equity, social justice, self- knowledge, personal empowerment, collaboration, citizenship, and service.

5 Service provides a powerful vehicle for developing student leadership capabilities in a collaborative environment. Learning happens by "making meaning" of life experiences.

6 Two Goals: Goal 1: Develop greater Self-knowledge and Leadership Competence Goal 2: Facilitate positive social change

7 Those who hold formal leadership positions as well as those who do not. In this model, leadership is viewed as a process rather than as a position

8 IndividualGroup Community What personal qualities are we attempting to foster and develop in those who participate in a leadership development program? What personal qualities are most supportive of group functioning and positive social change? How can the collaborative leadership development process be designed not only to facilitate the development of the desired individual qualities (above) but also to effect positive social change? Toward what social ends is the leadership development activity directed? What kinds of activities are the most effective in energizing the group and in developing desired personal qualities in the individual?

9 Individual Consciousness of selfAwareness of the beliefs, values, attitudes, and emotions that motivate one to take action. CongruenceThinking, feeling, and behaving with consistency, genuineness, authenticity, and honesty. CommitmentMotivational energy to serve and that drives the collective effort. Commitment implies passion, intensity, and duration.

10 What are the personal values that guide how you interact in groups? What strengths does your personal style bring to working in groups? In what ways does your style sometimes make group work challenging?

11 How do you build trust and credibility with yourself and with others? Is it possible to always be a person of congruence? In what kinds of situations is it more difficult? What kind of circumstances would cause you to walk away from a group?

12 What motivates you? Where do your passions lie? What topics on social issues get you excited? If there was one job you would do for free, what would that be? How has your commitment and passion been influenced? Have you influenced others?

13 Group CollaborationWorking with others in a common effort. It constitutes the cornerstone value of the group leadership effort because it empowers self and others through trust. Common PurposeWorking with shared aims and values. It facilitates the group’s ability to engage in collective analysis of the issues at hand and the task to be undertaken. Controversy with CivilityRecognizes two fundamental realities of any creative group effort: that differences in viewpoint are inevitable, and that these differences must be aired openly but with civility.

14 What is the difference between collaboration and cooperation? How can you tell if a group is functioning collaboratively versus cooperatively? What distinguishes the two? Is it possible to move a group from cooperative to collaborative, and, if so, how?

15 Thinking about your own experience, what is the difference between embracing a predefined vision and participating in the formulation of that vision with others?

16 How does controversy arise? How do you deal with controversy? How could you incorporate civility into controversy?

17 Community CitizenshipProcess whereby the individual and the collaborative group become responsibly connected to the community and the society through the leadership development activity.

18 Of what communities do you consider yourself a part? What does citizenship in those communities mean to you? What forms of active community involvement appeal to you most? How might you go about developing awareness of important issues in a community of which you are a part?

19 Consciousness of Self Congruence Commitment Collaboration Common Purpose Controversy with Civility Citizenship

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