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The Constitutional Convention Learning Objectives: SWBAT list the founding fathers and important people that were at the Constitutional Convention. SWBAT.

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Presentation on theme: "The Constitutional Convention Learning Objectives: SWBAT list the founding fathers and important people that were at the Constitutional Convention. SWBAT."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Constitutional Convention Learning Objectives: SWBAT list the founding fathers and important people that were at the Constitutional Convention. SWBAT describe the two different plans for government that were brought up at the Convention (the Virginia Plan vs. the New Jersey Plan) SWBAT tell about the many compromises the committee made to make the new government work. (the Great Compromise, the Three-fifths Compromise, Slave Trade Compromise) SWBAT explain how the Constitution was passed by the convention. Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 206

2 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 206 The Constitutional Convention

3 Setting the Scene Philadelphia State House = Independence Hall Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 206 The Constitutional Convention

4 Setting the Scene Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 206 The Constitutional Convention Independence Hall today...

5 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 206 The Constitutional Convention

6 An Amazing Assembly 55 delegates from 12 of the 13 colonies (no one from Rhode Island came) From as young as 26 (Jonathon Dayton) to as old as 81 (Benjamin Franklin) 8 delegates had also signed the Declaration of Independence Benjamin FranklinGeorge Washington Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 206 The Constitutional Convention The Delegates to the Convention

7 An Amazing Assembly Along with older, more experienced delegates there was a new generation of delegates in their thirties at the convention. Alexander Hamilton (Virginia) Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 207 The Constitutional Convention The Delegates to the Convention

8 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 207 The Constitutional Convention James Madison “The Father of the Constitution”

9 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 207 The Constitutional Convention

10 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 207 The Constitutional Convention Two Rival Plans

11 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 207 The Constitutional Convention

12 The delegates decided to replace the Articles of Confederation with a new plan for government. The Virginia Plan vs. The New Jersey Plan Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

13 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

14 Two Rival Plans - The Virginia Plan Introduced by: Edmund RandolphJames Madison Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

15 The Virginia Plan strong national government 3 branches (Legislative, Executive, Judicial) bicameral (2 house) legislature # of representatives based on population of a state in BOTH houses Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

16 The Virginia Plan strong national government 3 branches (Legislative, Executive, Judicial) bicameral (2 house) legislature # of representatives based on population of a state in BOTH houses Large population states liked this plan because they would have more representatives and therefore more power or more say in the government. Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

17 The Virginia Plan strong national government 3 branches (Legislative, Executive, Judicial) bicameral (2 house) legislature # of representatives based on population of a state in BOTH houses Small population states disliked this plan and thought it was unfair. They felt they would have little to no say in the government. Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

18 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

19 Two Rival Plans - The New Jersey Plan Introduced by: William Paterson Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

20 The New Jersey Plan strong national government 3 branches (Legislative, Executive, Judicial) unicameral (1 house) legislature each state has one vote Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

21 The New Jersey Plan strong national government 3 branches (Legislative, Executive, Judicial) unicameral (1 house) legislature each state has one vote Small population states liked this plan and felt it was more fair. Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

22 The New Jersey Plan strong national government 3 branches (Legislative, Executive, Judicial) unicameral (1 house) legislature each state has one vote Large population states disliked this plan and felt it was only fair for larger population states to have more votes because they were representing more citizens. Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

23 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

24 The Great Compromise - The Connecticut Plan Introduced by: Roger Sherman Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

25 The Great Compromise (Connecticut Plan) strong national government 3 branches (Legislative, Executive, Judicial) bicameral (2 house) legislature upper house (Senate) each state would get 2 representatives lower house (House of Representatives) # of representatives would depend on population of the state Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

26 The Great Compromise (Connecticut Plan) strong national government 3 branches (Legislative, Executive, Judicial) bicameral (2 house) legislature upper house (Senate) each state would get 2 representatives lower house (House of Representatives) # of representatives would depend on population of the state This plan was a compromise that both large population and small population states could agree on. Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

27 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

28 Northern and Southern States Compromise The northern states focused on small businesses and trade in their economy. The southern states focused on agriculture (farming) in their economy which meant they used slave labor. The middle states had a blend of both trade and agriculture with some small businesses as well. Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 208 The Constitutional Convention

29 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 209 The Constitutional Convention

30 Northern and Southern States Compromise After the issue of deciding how many representatives each state would get, the question of whether or not slaves could count as part of the state’s population towards earning representatives. The northern states felt slaves should not be counted since they were not free and could not vote. The southern states felt that slaves should be counted because the government still has to provide some services for them. The southern states did not have as many free citizens as the northern states and needed the slaves to count. Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 209 The Constitutional Convention

31 The Three-Fifths Compromise After much debate, the delegates agreed to count 3 out of every 5 slaves in the south towards representation in Congress. Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 209 The Constitutional Convention

32 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 209 The Constitutional Convention

33 The Slave Trade Another issue between northern and southern states was the issue of trading (buying and selling) slaves. Many northern states had already outlawed the slave trade. They wanted slave trading outlawed in the whole country. The southern states counted on slaves for their labor and were against this idea. Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 209 The Constitutional Convention

34 The Slave Trade - Compromise The North agreed that Congress would not outlaw the slave trade for at least 20 years. The North also compromised and promised not to prevent the South from recovering run-away slaves. Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 209 The Constitutional Convention

35 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 210 The Constitutional Convention

36 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 210 The Constitutional Convention How many years does the president serve?

37 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 210 The Constitutional Convention How many years does the president serve? 4

38 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 210 The Constitutional Convention How many justices (judges) in the Supreme Court?

39 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 210 The Constitutional Convention How many justices (judges) in the Supreme Court? 6 back then, 9 today

40 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 210 The Constitutional Convention Would Senators and Representatives get paid?

41 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 210 The Constitutional Convention Would Senators and Representatives get paid? No … but they are today

42 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 210 The Constitutional Convention

43 Signing the Constitution “I doubt…whether any other Convention …may be able to make a better Constitution …I cannot help expressing a wish, that every member of the Convention who may still have objections to it, would with me, on this occasion, doubt a little of his own infallibility, and…put his name to this instrument.” In the end, only 39 of the 55 delegates did sign the Constitution but it was a majority and enough for it to pass. Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 210 The Constitutional Convention

44 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 210 The Constitutional Convention

45 Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 210 The Constitutional Convention Signing the Constitution

46 Signing the Constitution When the convention was over, the Constitution was printed up and sent to the states for people to read, look over, and eventually vote on. Chapter 7 section 2 pg. 210 The Constitutional Convention


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