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Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter 13 Medieval Africa Chapter 13 Medieval Africa.

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Presentation on theme: "Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter 13 Medieval Africa Chapter 13 Medieval Africa."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Chapter 13 Medieval Africa Chapter 13 Medieval Africa

3 Chapter Introduction Section 1 The Rise of AfricanThe Rise of African Civilizations Section 2 Africa’s Government and Religion Section 3 African Society and CultureAfrica’s Governmentand ReligionAfrican Society andCulture Reading Review Chapter Assessment Medieval Africa Click on a hyperlink to view the corresponding slides.

4 Click the speaker button to play the audio. Medieval Africa

5 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Africa’s Geography Africa is the second-largest continent in the world.  The Sahara Desert is in Africa  (pages 445–446) The African continent contains rain forests; savannas, which are tropical grasslands; and deserts.  The Rise of African Civilizations The Sahara is the largest desert in the world.

6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Africa’s Geography (cont.) A plateau is an area of high, flat land.  The Nile River is Africa’s longest river.  Almost all of Africa, except the coastal plains, rests on a plateau.  The Rise of African Civilizations  (pages 445–446)

7 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. West African Empires (cont.) Camels could travel for days without water and stored fat in their humps for food.  Trade prospered after the introduction of the camel, and rulers of cities began to build empires. The Rise of African Civilizations (pages 447–449)

8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. How did the deserts affect travel in Africa? The deserts were difficult to cross. People avoided the desert by traveling along the coastlines. The Rise of African Civilizations

9 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. East Africa (cont.) Cities arose on the East African coast to support Arab-African trade.  The Rise of African Civilizations (pages 451–453) Zimbabwe was a great trading city.

10 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Islam in Africa Islam was popular in West African cities where Africans traded with Muslim Arabs, but not all West Africans accepted Islam.  (pages 464–467) Africa’s Government and Religion

11 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Traditional African Religions Many African groups believed in one supreme god.  (page 463) African religious practices vary from place to place, but their beliefs served similar purposes—to help people stay in touch with their history and provide rules for living.  Many Africans believed the spirits of dead relatives stayed with them when they died and that the spirits could talk to the supreme god. Africa’s Government and Religion

12 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Get Ready to Read (cont.) Focusing on the Main Ideas African Society and Culture The African slave trade changed greatly when Muslims and Europeans began taking captives from the continent. 

13 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Life in Medieval Africa They spread their language, Swahili, and their culture as they traveled.  (pages 469–470) Africans often lived with extended families, or families made up of several generations. African Society and Culture

14 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Life in Medieval Africa (cont.) Many African villages were matrilineal, meaning the people traced their ancestors through their mothers rather than their fathers.   (pages 469–470) African Society and Culture

15 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Life in Medieval Africa (cont.) Families and villages taught children the history of their people and the skills they would need as adults.  Stories were passed down through word- of-mouth, and lessons were given through short sayings called proverbs. (pages 469–470) African Society and Culture

16 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Slavery Africans enslaved criminals and enemies captured in war.  (pages 472–473) The slave trade grew as trade with Muslim merchants increased.  Slavery existed in Africa before the arrival of Europeans.  Muslims were not allowed to enslave other Muslims, but they could enslave people of other faiths. African Society and Culture

17 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Slavery (cont.) These enslaved people were used to farm crops of cotton, grapes, and sugar cane. The Portuguese brought enslaved Africans to Europe in  African Society and Culture (pages 472–473)

18 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. Slavery (cont.) In the late 1400s, Europeans established sugar plantations in the Americas and brought enslaved Africans to work the fields. African Society and Culture (pages 472–473)

19 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. Describe the religious beliefs of medieval Africans. Some people believed in traditional African religions and their gods. Others were followers of Christianity or Islam. Medieval Africa Section 2 Africa’s Government and Religion Review Main Ideas

20 Geography and Climate Zones in Africa

21 Trade in East Africa

22 African Religions Today

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25 Focus on Everyday Life Salt mining began in the Sahara in the Middle Ages. Ancient miners worked underground and in sand dunes to extract solid blocks of salt. The salt trade became a successful business for the African people. In ancient times, salt was so desirable that it was traded ounce for ounce for gold. There are many salt deposits in western Africa because part of the desert was once a shallow sea made up of salt water. When the sea dried up, salt was left behind. People need a small amount of salt to stay healthy. It is lost when people and animals sweat, so people need some in their food. In ancient times, before refrigerators or canned foods were invented, salt was used to keep foods from going bad. It also was used to add flavor to food. Africa’s Salt Mines

26 Connecting to the Past As salty water dries, it leaves behind the salt in salt deposits. 1.How do salt deposits form? 2.Why do you think salt was so valuable that it was traded ounce for ounce for gold? It was needed to keep people healthy and to preserve and flavor food. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer.

27 Click the speaker button to play the audio. Ruled 1312–1337 Mansa Musa

28 Click the speaker button to play the audio. Queen Nzinga c. 1582–1663


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