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Using CFB Ash As A Substitute For Portland Cement In Full Depth Reclamation Presented By Steve Dixon, Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc. Jim Panaro,

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Presentation on theme: "Using CFB Ash As A Substitute For Portland Cement In Full Depth Reclamation Presented By Steve Dixon, Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc. Jim Panaro,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Using CFB Ash As A Substitute For Portland Cement In Full Depth Reclamation Presented By Steve Dixon, Civil & Environmental Consultants, Inc. Jim Panaro, Robindale Energy Services, Inc. August 20, 2014 Prepared For ARIPPA TECHNICAL SYMPOSIUM

2 Items To Be Covered ►A Description Of The Full Depth Reclamation Process ►Why Is It Needed? ►The Benefits Of Full Depth Reclamation ►State DOTs Involved With Full Depth Reclamation ►A Closer Look At PennDOT And Full Depth Reclamation ►Full Depth Reclamation Test Project Using CFB Ash In Butler County, PA

3 Full Depth Reclamation (FDR) - Introduction ►Full depth reclamation is a rehabilitation technique in which all of the asphalt pavement section and a predetermined amount of underlying materials are treated to produce a stabilized base course.

4 FDR - Introduction ►The Procedure Consists Of Five Steps: ▪Pulverization Of Existing Materials ▪Stabilization - Introduction Of Additive(s) ▪Shaping Of The Mixed Material ▪Compaction ▪Application Of Driving Surface

5 FDR - Introduction ►The Procedure Consists Of Five Steps: ▪Pulverization Of Existing Materials ▪Stabilization - Introduction Of Additive(s) ▪Shaping Of The Mixed Material ▪Compaction ▪Application Of Driving Surface

6 Pulverization - Reclaiming Machine

7 Pulverization & Mixing ►Pulverization consists of grinding the road surface and base to be reclaimed

8 Close-Up Of Milling Drum

9 FDR - Introduction ►The Procedure Consists Of Five Steps: ▪Pulverization Of Existing Materials ▪Stabilization - Introduction Of Additive(s) ▪Shaping Of The Mixed Material ▪Compaction ▪Application Of Driving Surface

10 Stabilization ►Mechanical Stabilization – Addition Of Aggregate Material ►Bituminous Stabilization – Addition Of Asphalt-Based Emulsions ►Chemical Stabilization – ▪Lime ▪Cement ▪Fly Ash ▪Combination

11 FDR - Introduction ►The Procedure Consists Of Five Steps: ▪Pulverization Of Existing Materials ▪Stabilization - Introduction Of Additive(s) ▪Shaping Of The Mixed Material ▪Compaction ▪Application Of Driving Surface

12 FDR - Introduction ►The Procedure Consists Of Five Steps: ▪Pulverization Of Existing Materials ▪Stabilization - Introduction Of Additive(s) ▪Shaping Of The Mixed Material ▪Compaction ▪Application Of Driving Surface

13 FDR - Introduction ►The Procedure Consists Of Five Steps: ▪Pulverization Of Existing Materials ▪Stabilization - Introduction Of Additive(s) ▪Shaping Of The Mixed Material ▪Compaction ▪Application Of Driving Surface

14 Location Of Shale Formations Source: Marcellus Sale Coalition

15 Stress On Secondary Roads

16 FDR - Benefits (Graphic by cement.org)

17 States Having Significant Experience With FDR ►California ►Georgia ►Illinois ►Iowa* ►Kansas* ►Maine ►Michigan ►Missouri* ►New Mexico ►Ohio* ►Oregon ►Pennsylvania* ►Texas ►Virginia ►Washington

18 PennDOT Publications That Have Been Updated To Include FDR ►Publication 408 – Highway Specifications ►Publication 242 – Pavement Policy Manual ►Publication 27 - Bituminous Concrete Mixtures, Design Procedures, And Specifications For Special Bituminous Mixtures ►Publication 23 – Maintenance Manual (FDR as a maintenance strategy) ►Publication 30 – Portland Cement Concrete (Mix Design Procedure for Chemical Stabilization as a Full Depth Reclamation Method).

19 PennDOT Publication 30: Mix Design Procedure For Chemical Stabilization As A Full Depth Reclamation (FDR) Method ►“Stabilizing Agent Can Be The Following Materials Or Combination Of These Materials: ▪Cement: Publication 408, Section 701 (3 to 8% by weight) ▪Hydrated Lime: Publication 408, Section 723 (2 to 6% by weight) ▪Fly Ash: Publication 408, Section 724.2(a) (6 to 14% by weight) ▪Lime Pozzolan: Publication 408, Section 725 (6 to 8% by weight) ▪Quicklime ▪Class C Fly Ash ▪Fluidized Bed Combustion Fly Ash”

20 PennDOT Publication 30: Mix Design Procedure For Chemical Stabilization As A Full Depth Reclamation (FDR) Method, Continued ►“Fluidized Bed Combustion Fly Ash Has Been Used As A Partial Cement Replacement With Success.” ►“For The Final Mix Design, The Required Amount Of Cement Will Be That Which Provides An Average Unconfined Compressive Strength Of The Three Specimens Not Less Than 2068 kPA (300 psi) In 7 days. Hydrated Lime or Fly Ash (Including Fluidized Bed Combustion Fly Ash) Can Be Used In Place Of Cement As Long As The Desired Strength Can Be Met.”

21 PennDOT FDR Report

22 Elements Of An FDR Project Source: PennDOT Pub 23

23 PennDOT FDR Test Projects ►SR 1017 Dauphin County ▪Chemical Stabilization Agent: Asphalt Emulsion ▪Project Duration: 8/23/2010 – 8/26/2010 ▪Length Of Test Section: 0.7 Miles ►SR 3016 Butler County ▪Chemical Stabilization Agents: Portland Cement And Portland Cement/CFB Fly Ash ▪Project Duration: 6/11/2011 – 6/14/2011 ▪Lengths Of Test Sections: Multiple

24 PennDOT FDR Test Project – SR 3016 Butler County, PA

25 PennDOT FDR – Test Sections ►June 6, 2011:Total Length Of Road = 927 Feet ▪Sections 1 & 2 - Cement As The Stabilizing Agent. Application Rate Was 7.27 lbs/ft 2 ▪Sections 3 & 4 – Combination Fly Ash And Cement. Application Rate Was 6.18 lbs/ft 2, 4.32 lbs/ft 2 For Fly Ash (Target Was 3.61 lbs/ft 2 ) ►June 7, 2011: Total Length of Road = 900 feet ▪Entire Section - Combination Of Fly Ash and Cement Placed In Layers, First Fly Ash And Then Cement. Application Rate Was 7.10 lbs/ft 2 (4.95 lbs/ft 2 For Fly Ash) ▪Thickness Of Fly Ash Ranged From 1.00 Inch To 1.60 Inches While The Combination Of Fly Ash & Cement Ranged From 1.75 Inches To 2.38 Inches

26 PennDOT FDR – Test Sections, continued ►June 8, 2011: Total Length of Road = 900 Feet ►Three, 300-foot Sections Using A Fly Ash And Cement Mixture ►Application Rate Was 4.75 lbs/ft 2 For Fly Ash And 5.68 lbs/ft 2 For The Fly Ash And Cement Combination

27 Stabilization ►CFB Ash And Portland Cement, About To Be Applied (Previously Compacted Surface In The Foreground)

28 Challenges With Placing Dry Stabilizing Agents

29 Second Pass Of The Reclaimer ►Stabilizing Agents, CFB Ash And Cement, And Water Are Integrated Into The Pulverized Roadway

30 Mixing ►Mixture Of Water, CFB Ash, And Portland Cement Exiting Rear Of Reclaimer

31 Mixing CFB Stabilizing Agent Second Pass Mixing

32 Shaping ►Grading To Achieve Desired Surface Profile

33 Shaping, continued

34

35 Compaction ►Methodology Should Be Matched To The Depth Of The Reclamation. To Achieve The Maximum Benefits From This Process The Base Needs To Be At Maximum Density

36 Quality Assurance & Acceptance ►At Least 95% Compaction At Optimum Moisture ►Optimum Moisture Can’t Be Exceeded By More Than 3% ►Cores Were Taken From The Section After A Seven Day Wet Cure Period. The Performance Was Within The Acceptable Target Range Of psi. ►Hot Mix Asphalt Overlay Was Placed As The Final Wearing Surface

37 Compacted Road Awaiting Performance Testing

38 Sections Of FDR Test Road 6/7/20117/3/2014

39 Sections Of FDR Test Road 6/7/2011 7/3/2014

40 Sections Of FDR Test Road 7/3/2014

41 Happy Motoring!


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