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Lamar’s Presidency Unit 6: Chapter 12 Section 2. I. Mirabeau Lamar Becomes President Texans elected Lamar president when Houston’s term ended in 1838.

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Presentation on theme: "Lamar’s Presidency Unit 6: Chapter 12 Section 2. I. Mirabeau Lamar Becomes President Texans elected Lamar president when Houston’s term ended in 1838."— Presentation transcript:

1 Lamar’s Presidency Unit 6: Chapter 12 Section 2

2 I. Mirabeau Lamar Becomes President Texans elected Lamar president when Houston’s term ended in Improving education was Lamar’s main goal, but he had many other goals during term. He becomes known as the “Father of Education in Texas”.

3 Congress set aside nearly 18,000 acres of land in each county to support public schools. Lamar also opposed annexation. He wanted Texas to be a powerful nation, reaching to the Pacific Ocean. I. Mirabeau Lamar Becomes President

4 I. The Cordova Rebellion After the Texas revolution some Mexicans living in Nacogdoches remained loyal to Mexico. After the Texas revolution some Mexicans living in Nacogdoches remained loyal to Mexico. In the summer of 1838, Vicente Cordova gathered a group of 400 Native Americans and Mexican loyalists on the Angelina River. However, Before anything could happen the group was defeated by Texas forces. In the summer of 1838, Vicente Cordova gathered a group of 400 Native Americans and Mexican loyalists on the Angelina River. However, Before anything could happen the group was defeated by Texas forces. The impact led to distrust of Mexicans and the urge to remove the Cherokees from Texas. The impact led to distrust of Mexicans and the urge to remove the Cherokees from Texas.

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6 III. The Capital Is Moved to Austin 1839 Congress approved Waterloo on the Colorado River as the site of a permanent capital. The new capital was named Austin, in honor of Stephen F. Austin. In Austin, the government built a large, capitol building on Congress Avenue.

7 IV. Lamar’s Policy Towards the Indians Lamar believed the Cherokees had no fair claim to Texas lands they occupied. 1839: ordered Cherokees removed from Texas. Battle of Neches results. Surviving Cherokees were forced from their land and moved across the Red River out of Texas and into Oklahoma and Arkansas.

8 II. Chief ”Duwali” Bowles Chief Bowles was ordered to lead the Cherokees out of Texas by Lamar. Chief Bowles was ordered to lead the Cherokees out of Texas by Lamar. When he refused, he was attacked & killed along with 100 others at the Battle of Neches near present-day Tyler. When he refused, he was attacked & killed along with 100 others at the Battle of Neches near present-day Tyler.

9 V. Raids Lead to Council House Fight The Comanches raid several white settlements from Later, the Comanche leaders agree to meet with Texas authorities. The Comanches promised to bring their Anglo captives, but produced only one girl, Matilda Lockhart (who appeared bruised and beaten). The angered Texans tried to take the Comanches hostage, but they resisted and fighting broke out.

10 Raids Lead to Council House Fight This incident was called the Council House Fight. 7 Texans and 35 Comanches died in the fighting. The Council House Fight has been called “the greatest blunder in the history of Texan-Indian relations.” It led to more raids, battles (Plum Creek), and overall more bloody conflict.

11 Lamar’s Conflicts with the Comanches

12 VI. Texas Rebuilds Its Navy Lamar ordered a newly restored navy into Mexican waters. He thought Mexico would recognize Texas in exchange for the promise that the navy would not invade Mexico. Mexico still would not recognize Texas. The rebuilding of the Texas navy had raised the debt. Sam Houston won the presidency again in 1841 and recalled the navy.

13 VII. The Santa Fe Expedition The Texans wanted control of Santa Fe, a trading center on the upper Rio Grande in present-day New Mexico. 1841: Lamar sent an expedition party to Santa Fe to try to control the region and open up trade for Texas.

14 Santa Fe Expedition, 1841

15 The Santa Fe Expedition The Santa Fe expedition had many misfortunes and hardships; heat, shortages of water and food, and Indian attacks that led to suffering. The expedition was also confronted by a Mexican army that took the Texans captive and forced them to march 1,000 miles to Mexico City where some were later imprisoned.

16 III. Jose Antonio Navarro Was the voice of the Tejano’s and tried to protect Tejano land and rights. Was the voice of the Tejano’s and tried to protect Tejano land and rights. Lamar supporter and Houston critic Lamar supporter and Houston critic Was chosen as a commissioner on the Santa Fe Expedition Was chosen as a commissioner on the Santa Fe Expedition Later he served on the Texas Senate and helped write the State Constitution of 1845 Later he served on the Texas Senate and helped write the State Constitution of 1845 Navarro County is named after him Navarro County is named after him

17 Financial Difficulties Lamar’s purchase of navy ships and their maintenance were expensive. The expeditions were also expensive. As a result, Texas paper money called “redbacks” was issued to help reduce the debt. Ultimately, they became worthless and had no value. Texas was deeply in debt when Lamar left office – more than $7 million!

18 Lamar’s Presidency - Overview The “Education President” Against annexation Supported Texas expansion separate from the U.S. Earned recognition from European countries Enlarged Texas Navy Santa Fe Expedition – failure Issued Redbacks (Texas Money) caused inflation Increased debt to over $7 million Moved capital from Houston to Austin Hostile toward American Indians – Cherokees and Comanches (Council House Fight)


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