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Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D. Director, Counseling and Wellness Services Associate Professor, School of Professional Psychology.

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Presentation on theme: "Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D. Director, Counseling and Wellness Services Associate Professor, School of Professional Psychology."— Presentation transcript:

1 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D. Director, Counseling and Wellness Services Associate Professor, School of Professional Psychology Wright State University Dayton, Ohio Director, Counseling and Wellness Services Associate Professor, School of Professional Psychology Wright State University Dayton, Ohio

2 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000 Situational Leadership Theory (Hersey & Blanchard, 1977) Situational Leadership Theory (Hersey & Blanchard, 1977) Adaptive Counseling and Therapy (Howard, Nance, & Myers, 1986) Adaptive Counseling and Therapy (Howard, Nance, & Myers, 1986) Adaptive Supervision in Counselor Training (Rando, 2000) Adaptive Supervision in Counselor Training (Rando, 2000)

3 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000 Adaptive Counseling and Therapy - ACT Adaptive Counseling and Therapy - ACT  Readiness  Intervention Style  Match & Move  Readiness  Intervention Style  Match & Move Adaptive Supervision in Counselor Training - ASiCT Adaptive Supervision in Counselor Training - ASiCT

4 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000 ReadinessReadiness   Willingness   Ability   Self-Confidence   Willingness   Ability   Self-Confidence Attitude Motivation Fear Attitude Motivation Fear Task Relevant: Knowledge Skills Knowledge Skills Personal Empowerment Self-Respect Self-Regard Personal Empowerment Self-Respect Self-Regard

5 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000 Two Dimensions  Direction  Support Two Dimensions  Direction  Support Concern Concern Empathy Empathy Regard Regard Relational Relational Concern Concern Empathy Empathy Regard Regard Relational Relational Goal Directed Goal Directed Who? What? When? and Where? Who? What? When? and Where? Sequencing? Techniques/Methods? Sequencing? Techniques/Methods? Who’s responsible for what? Who’s responsible for what? Goal Directed Goal Directed Who? What? When? and Where? Who? What? When? and Where? Sequencing? Techniques/Methods? Sequencing? Techniques/Methods? Who’s responsible for what? Who’s responsible for what? Intervention Styles

6 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000 Match & Move Match Intervention Style (of Therapist – ACT or of Supervisor – ASiCT) to Client (ACT) or Trainee (ASiCT) Readiness GOAL: Move target (i.e., to higher level of readiness

7 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000 READINESS

8 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000

9 ACT

10 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000 ASiCT

11 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000

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13 In viewing a videotape of Tom’s session with his client you notice that he is not reflecting the client’s emotional content. Tom is an advanced intern with strong therapeutic skills. In discussing his interaction with the client, you learn that this client represents Tom’s first time working with a physically violent client. Tom states, “I just don’t know what to do. Do you think it would be o.k. for me to refer him?” Which response would you most likely make? a. “No. You’ll continue to work with this client. You need to use more reflection in your responding to him.” b. “I understand that working with a batterer can be intimidating. Tell me what that’s like for you.” c. “I understand that working with a violent client is difficult. Tell me more.” d. “Say more about that.”

14 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000 Sue is an experienced chemical dependency counselor. She reports that she is working with a client who has a problem with alcohol abuse. Sue presents a well developed treatment plan for the client. She then inquires, “How does that sound?” Which response would you most likely make? a. “I’d like you to rule out substance dependence as well?” b. “Sounds like you did a great job. I’d like you to further expand your goals for the client?” c. “Good. It seems like you are on top of the situation.” d. “Fine. What else do you have for me today?”

15 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000 You are informed by a colleague that Talbot has been expressing misgivings about the quality of the supervision that you are providing to other trainees and your colleagues. You colleague informs you that she informed Talbot that he should express his concerns directly to you and that she may inform you of the situation as well. Talbot proceeds through the next supervision without making a comment. You notice that he is providing minimal information and seems rather distracted. This pattern continues into the next supervisory meeting. Which response would you most likely make? a. “Talbot, I talked with Dr. Jones. I’d like you to tell me about your concerns regarding the supervision that you are receiving.” b. “Talbot, I understand from Dr. Jones that you are not satisfied with the quality of the supervision that you are receiving. I recognize that it may be intimidating to talk about this with me, but I’d like you to share your concerns.” c. “Talbot, I understand from Dr. Jones that you are not satisfied with the quality of the supervision that you are receiving. I recognize that it may be intimidating to talk about this with your supervisor.” d. “Do you have anything else that you’d like to talk about today?”

16 Robert A. Rando, Ph.D., ©2000 Tyler is trainee in the early phases of her training. She is working with her second client. You view a session in which Tyler defends her view to the client after the client challenges her intervention. When you ask Tyler about her choice to defend her view to the client, she states, “I’m not sure. Did I do something wrong? I guess that I wanted her to understand where I’m coming from. She doesn’t seem to buy into the treatment plan.” Which response would you most likely make. a. “Don’t defend yourself to the client.” b. “It is difficult when a client challenges you. You probably want to reply to the emotion or cognition behind the client’s challenge versus defending your treatment.” c. “It is difficult when a client challenges you. I wonder what that must have been like for you.” d.“What was that like for you.”


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