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Smart Choices Food and Drink Supply Strategy for Queensland Schools A partnership between Education Queensland and Queensland Health.

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Presentation on theme: "Smart Choices Food and Drink Supply Strategy for Queensland Schools A partnership between Education Queensland and Queensland Health."— Presentation transcript:

1 Smart Choices Food and Drink Supply Strategy for Queensland Schools A partnership between Education Queensland and Queensland Health

2 Prevalence of overweight and obesity in Australian children, ( )

3 Contributing factors Changed diet Changed physical activity patterns

4 It’s all about balance Energy in =Energy out = Food and drinksPhysical activity and consumedbody functions

5 Working together Queensland Health and Education Queensland Joint Work Plan 2004 – 2007 Healthy Weight Working Group Nutrition Reference Group

6 Smart Choices A strategy to ensure that all food and drinks supplied in schools are consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Children and Adolescents

7 Healthy Food and Drink Supply Strategy for Queensland Schools School tuckshops Vending machines School excursions School camps Fundraising Classroom rewards School events Sports days Curriculum activities

8 Time lines Semester 2, January, 2007 Smart Choices Tool Kit Smart Choices Resource Phasing in new in schools! Package products StrategyPhasing out Poster contracts for CD-ROM ‘RED’ foods Consultation with key stakeholders on implementation

9 Basis for food and drink selection

10 GREEN – Have plenty Encourage and promote these foods and drinks Because they: are good sources of nutrients contain less saturated fat and/or added sugar and/or salt help to avoid an intake of excess energy (kJ)

11 GREEN foods and drinks Water All types of breads, preferably wholegrain Fruits – fresh, dried, canned Vegetables – fresh and frozen Legumes – kidney beans, lentils, chick-peas Reduced-fat dairy products including flavoured milks Lean meat, fish and poultry and alternatives

12 AMBER – Select carefully Do not let these foods and drinks dominate Avoid large serving sizes Because they: have limited nutritional value have moderate levels of saturated fat and/or added sugar and/or salt can, in large serve sizes, contribute excess energy (kJ)

13 AMBER foods and drinks Full-fat dairy foods Savoury commercial products Processed meats Some snack food bars Some savoury biscuits, popcorn, crispbreads Some cakes, muffins, sweet biscuits Some ice-creams, milk-based ice confections and dairy desserts Fruit juices (100%) Breakfast cereals – refined with added sugars

14 ‘Occasional’ (RED) food and drink criteria tables

15 Steps in determining if a food or drink fits into the RED category What category? g/100 g or per serve? Nutrients of concern Compare figures on labels of nutrient criteria If the figures listed on the label for any of the three nutrients is greater than the number shown in the criteria, then that product falls into the RED end of the spectrum.

16 Reading labels Crumbed chicken fillet burger and check the Occasional Food and Drink Criteria Table Look at the per 100 g column You have now determined that this food is NOT an Occasional Food

17 RED – Occasionally Do not supply these foods and drinks on more than two occasions per term Because they: lack adequate nutritional value are high in saturated fat and/or added sugar and/or salt can contribute excess energy (kJ)

18 RED foods and drinks Soft drinks Energy drinks Flavoured mineral water Confectionery Deep fried foods Crisps, chips and similar products Sweet pastries Chocolate coated and premium ice-creams Croissants Doughnuts Cream-filled buns/cakes/slices Large serves of cakes and muffins

19 Choosing your ‘occasion’ RED – no more than two occasions per term Not each RED food or drink being supplied twice per term Special events that involve the tuckshop and the broader community

20 Trialling new foods and drinks Reduced-fat pies Healthy vending machines with milks, yoghurts, water, popcorn Fresh sliced watermelon Fruit salad Sushi Salad wraps and boxes Frozen fruit juices

21 You can do it! School statistics: Metropolitan high school 1270 students Senior health students Tuckshop Advisory Committee Sales and profits increased

22 Primary schools make healthy choices Strong leadership Whole school community New food and drink choices Tuckshop promoted through lucky dips and colouring competitions

23 Where to now? Working together with school community Surveying the students A Tuckshop Advisory Committee Trialling new foods and drinks Phasing out existing contracts for ‘RED’ foods and drinks

24 Support Education Queensland –www.education.qld.gov.au/schools/healthywww.education.qld.gov.au/schools/healthy Queensland Association of School Tuckshops - Nutrition Australia –www.nutritionaustralia.org/About_Us/Offices/qld.aspwww.nutritionaustralia.org/About_Us/Offices/qld.asp Queensland Council of Parents and Citizens Association –www.qcpca.org.au/www.qcpca.org.au/ Queensland Health - for food safety information –www.health.qld.gov.auwww.health.qld.gov.au

25 Smart choices today – Healthy young people in the future!


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