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ELEVATING WORK PLATFORMS By Richard Hadcroft. PARTIES INVOLVED.

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Presentation on theme: "ELEVATING WORK PLATFORMS By Richard Hadcroft. PARTIES INVOLVED."— Presentation transcript:

1 ELEVATING WORK PLATFORMS By Richard Hadcroft

2 PARTIES INVOLVED

3 ANSI / SAIA A92.2 Vehicle-Mounted Elevating and Rotating Aerial Devices  This type of lift is usually owned by the entity that uses them.  Highly specialized machines.  Used mostly for electrical line maintenance and aerial tree trimming.

4 ANSI / SAIA A92.3 Manually Propelled Elevating Aerial Platform  This type of lift is usually owned by the entity that uses them.  Covers all aerial platforms not capable of moving under their own power.  The most common of these are push-around, one-occupant vertical lists generically called ‘Genies,’ although a number of manufacturers make them.  The fact that the lift mechanism may be powered has no bearing on the ‘manual’ reference.

5 ANSI / SAIA A92.5 Boom-Supported Elevating Work Platforms  This type of lift is usually rented.  Covers self-propelled units with a platform that can be positioned completely beyond its base.  These machines are most often used outdoors or on inclines and rough terrain.

6 ANSI / SAIA A92.6 Self-Propelled Elevating Work Platforms  This type of lift is usually rented.  Covers scissor lifts as well as other various platforms that elevate by means of articulating arms.

7 ‘COMPETENT’ VERSUS ‘QUALIFIED’ An OSHA ‘competent person’ is defined as ‘one who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.’ An OSHA ‘qualified person’ is defined as ‘one who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training, and experience, has successfully demonstrated his ability to solve or resolve problems relating to the subject matter, the work, or the project.’ ‘There are currently no specific standards regarding competent persons.’

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9 ANSI & OSHA ROLES AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS

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11 VALLEY STREAM, LONG ISLAND, NEW YORK

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14 CHAPTER WAC

15 INSPECTION, REPAIR, MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING

16 OSHA INTERPRETATION LETTERS “This is in response to your letter of May 27 to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in which you asked whether an employee working from a scissors lift equipped with guardrails needed to wear a ‘safety harness.’ You further expressed concern for the confusion created by OSHA’s scaffold standard and its directive.” “We recognize that there is confusion regarding scissors lifts and the appropriate standards governing such equipment. The confusion stems from the way OSHA’s directive is worded.” Russell B. Swanson, Director Directorate of Construction – 07/21/1998

17 OSHA INTERPRETATION LETTERS “Please note, however, that if an employer is in full compliance with the requirements of the relevant document of the ANSI A92 series, OSHA would consider that compliance as providing an appropriate degree of safety for employees.” Russell B. Swanson, Director Directorate of Construction – 07/21/1998 “Employers are encouraged to comply with current versions of national consensus standards as long as the current version provides at least the level of safety and health otherwise provided by complying with applicable OSHA standards. Under the de minimis violation policy, OSHA will recognize compliance with ANSI A for this type of equipment.” Richard Fairfax, Director Directorate of Compliance Programs – 05/13/1999

18 OSHA INTERPRETATION LETTERS “OSHA accepts employers’ use of the current revision to national consensus standards in place of earlier revisions incorporated by reference or adopted into OSHA standards. This acceptance is predicated on using the current revision such that at least the same level of safety and health is provided as required by complying with OSHA standards.” John B. Miles, Director Directorate of Compliance Programs – 06/17/1996

19 CHAPTER WAC

20 COMPARISON OF ANSI A & ANSI A & 6.7 – Frequent & Annual Inspections ‘The inspection[s] shall be performed by a person(s) qualified as a mechanic on the specific make and model of the aerial platform … … or one having similar design characteristics.’

21 INSPECTION, REPAIR, MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING

22 NASA-STD – Inspections ‘Inspections shall be performed on all mobile aerial platforms. Inspections shall be performed according to this section, the manufacturers’ recommendations, and the applicable ANSI / SIA standard. Inadequacies discovered during an inspection shall be documented and, if determined to be a hazard, tagged out and corrected prior to further use. Inspections shall be performed by qualified personnel according to approved technical operating procedures.’

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25 GENERAL TRAINING AND FAMILIARIZATION 1. The purpose and use of manuals. 11. Actual operation of the aerial platform. Under the direction of a qualified person, the trainee shall operate the aerial platform for a sufficient period of time to demonstrate proficiency in the actual operation of the aerial platform. 2. That operating manuals are an integral part of the aerial platform and must be stored properly in the weather resistant compartment when not in use. 3. A pre-start inspection. 4. Responsibilities associated with problems or malfunctions affecting the operation of the aerial platform. 5. Factors affecting stability. 6. The purpose of placards and decals. 7. Workplace inspection. 8. Safety rules and regulations. 9. Authorization to operate. 10. Operator warnings and instructions.

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28 INSPECTION AND REPAIR RECORDS REQUIREMENTS Use WAC / 40025

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