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World Maritime Day – October 22 – 24, 2014

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Presentation on theme: "World Maritime Day – October 22 – 24, 2014"— Presentation transcript:

1 World Maritime Day – October 22 – 24, 2014
IMO – Port Reception Facility Development Ginger Garte, Americas Environmental Manager

2 Sustainability: Risks for Ocean Industries
ocean industry businesses face increasingly complex challenges

3 90% Goods brought to us by ships
Submarine Cables Offshore Wind Cobalt Crusts Deepwater Oil Fisheries

4 Marine Ecosystem Impact
278 offices delivering services in 228 countries Some 7,500 employees of 90 nationalities 101 companies Celebrating our 250 year anniversary this year Four business divisions: Marine Transportation (rail sector) Energy (ModuSpec, Scandpower) Management Systems (LRQA) Anticipated annual turnover $1.0bn Human Impacts to Marine Ecosystems Global data on human impacts to marine ecosystems   Global Map of Human Impacts to Marine Ecosystems The goal of the research presented here is to estimate and visualize, for the first time, the global impact humans are having on the ocean's ecosystems. The full impact model, source impact layers, and ecosystem extents can all be downloaded in a variety of formats.  Metadata: Spatial Resolution: ~1 km Extent: Global Temporal Resolution:  N/A Date Range: 02/2008 Format(s): PDF, JPEG, KML, compressed ESRI Grid, GeoTIFF,  compressed .ASC Access Methods: HTTP Data Access: (input datasets are also available: and CoML visualization guidance: TBD

5 MARPOL Annex V To prevent pollution of garbage/residues from ships
IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee MEPC began meeting in 1973 shortly after IMO adopted the Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships or MARPOL. • One important regulation in MARPOL for ports: “the Government of each Party is to ensure the provision for reception of ship‐generated residues”

6 MARPOL Annex V discharge standards – January 1, 2013
All Oceans are essentially a “no discharge zone” with the exception of food wastes (which may have to be comminuted or ground (25 mm screen) in some areas. Dry Cargo Residues if not harmful to marine environment (HME) and in small quantities. GMP + GRB (400 GT and above)

7 Prevention of pollution from ships garbage
IMO MARPOL Annex V Prevention of pollution from ships garbage MARPOL imposes one important obligation to the Government of each Party, To provide PRF for ship-generated residues and garbage that cannot be discharged into the sea PRF must be adequate to meet the needs of ships using the port, Without causing undue delay to ships Incentivize ships use of PRF to comply with MARPOL and to minimize discharges to sea. (Disposal of ships waste to take place in an environmentally appropriate way) Sustaining ocean health and productivity requires responsible use and stewardship by all users. The relevant regulations on port reception facilities are: Annex I: regulation 38; Annex II: regulation 18; Annex IV: regulation 12; Annex V: regulation 7; Annex VI: regulation 17.

8 Port Reception Facility References
IMO MEPC 1/Circ.834 Consolidated Guidance for PRF Providers and Users Appendix 1 – IMO Circular MEPC.1/Circ.469/Rev.1, ‘Revised Consolidated Format for Reporting Alleged Inadequacy of Port Reception Facilities Appendix 2 – MEPC.1/Circ.644: Standard Format for the Advance Notification Form Appendix 3 – MEPC.1/Circ.645: Standard Format for the Waste Delivery Receipt IMO MEPC Inadequacy of PRF MARPOL Annex V Placard January 1, 2013 Basel Convention Associated Port Waste Management Plan and STD waste segregation use of ISO std ISO/CD 21070

9 Port Reception Facility Tools
Global Integrated Shipping Information System (GISIS) Port Reception Facility Database (PRFD) PRFD convey current global PRF information, PRFD to be user friendly; PRFD populated w/ all available PRF PRFD by port/Country; waste category International Organization for Standardization ISO Standards Promoting Environmentally Sound Management of Ship’s Waste: Shipboard Waste Management Port Reception Facility Planning and Operation *Guide to Good Practice on PRF found on GISIS website: IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) developed guidelines to assist developing countries in taking the necessary steps to implement the 1973 Convention” Early on there were difficulties meeting the guidelines

10 PRF Gaps Member states not consistently updating PRFD
“the Government of each Party is to ensure the provision for reception of ship‐generated residues” = challenge for certain wastes/residuals Inadequate PRF submissions to MEPC from Port States were not representative of global fleet

11 World Maritime Day – October 22 – 24, 2014
IMO – Port Reception Facility Development Ginger Garte, Americas Environmental Manager

12 Waste Support Vessels Pictures by kind permission of Jonathan Morley

13 Annex V – Waste Management PRF
Picture by kind permission of Jonathan Morley ©

14 Managing Shipboard Wastes ISO 21070
Shipboard Equipment/Technology Compactors Crushers Balers Comminuters Pulpers Plasma Arc / Gasification Waste Systems Shredders Incinerators Waste segregation systems Fluorescent lamp systems Drum compactors Electronics/battery recycling

15 Management of Wastes at PRF ISO 16304
Key to communicate best practices & facilitate tours of port/vendors/ship Know or request international, national and local regulations for waste streams Waste Management Planning SHIP – PORT – VENDOR stakeholder engagement Waste segregation/sorting stations Storage transfer options Waste minimizing options Waste handling equipment (age) Recycling options $$ Treatment technologies Visioning the solution between key stakeholders

16 Future Port Reception Facilities
New technology and waste stream processing capabilities shore side Lean supply chain practices offer efficiencies/savings Focus on mutually beneficial way forward for Cleaner Oceans Best Management Practices for Environmentally Sound Management of ships waste Aboard and Ashore Embracing Concepts of “Cradle-to-Cradle” management of ships’ waste; principles of Reduce, Re-use Recycle and ReThink Environmentally safe ultimate disposal … Working toward keeping ships’ waste out of the oceans. Disposal of ships waste to take place in an environmentally appropriate way

17 Port Insider https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMn8CZZs9QY&feature=youtu.be

18 Thank You!

19 Thank You ! www.oceancouncil.org World Ocean Council - PRF WG Chair
Ginger Garte Americas Environmental Manager Lloyd’s Register North America 1000 S. Pine Island Road Plantation, FL T E w Thank You !

20 Summary – Port Reception Facility Adequacy
A lot of work has been done and progress made Significant gaps still exist Tools need to be effective How to incentivize use of PRF where government funding not available Increase in PRF Capacity Focus on mutually beneficial way forward for Cleaner Oceans: Best Management Practices for Environmentally Sound Management of ships waste Aboard and Ashore Enhanced Record Keeping and Reporting for ship Embracing Concepts of “Cradle-to-Cradle” management of ships’ waste; principles of Reduce, Re-use and Recycle Environmentally safe ultimate disposal Working toward keeping ships’ waste out of the oceans. Disposal of ships waste to take place in an environmentally appropriate way

21 MARPOL Annex V details Discharge of all forms of plastics, including garbage containing plastic, into the sea, is prohibited! An international treaty and domestic law prohibit discharge of most garbage from ships under strict conditions, except for a limited list of materials. Outside Special Areas designated under MARPOL Annex V: With the exception of discharging cleaning agents in washing water; the ship must be en route. Comminuted or ground food wastes (capable of passing through a screen with openings no larger than 25mm) may be discharged not less than 3 nautical miles from the nearest land. Other food wastes may be discharged not less than 12 nautical miles from the nearest land. Non-harmful cargo residues may be discharged not less than 12 nautical miles from the nearest land. Cleaning agents or additives in cargo hold, deck and external surfaces washing water may be discharged only if they are not harmful to the marine environment. Inside Special Areas designated under MARPOL Annex V, more stringent discharge requirements apply for the discharges of food wastes and cargo residues. Consult Annex V and the shipboard garbage management plan for details. Discharge of any type of garbage must be entered in the Garbage Record Book

22 World Ocean Council: Members
Almi Tankers S.A. Global Trust Certification Ocean Nourishment A.P. Moller-Maersk A/S Golder Associates Ocean Peace Inc. Arctic Fibre Guangxi Penshibao Co., Ltd OceanNetworks Canada Baird Publications Heidmar, Inc. OneOcean Battelle Memorial Institute Hepburn Biocare PanGeo Subsea Beveridge & Diamond, P.C. Holman Fenwick Willan LLP Powerboat P1 BigBlueStuff Hull Surface Treatment RightShip Birds Eye – Igloo Hydrex Rio Tinto Blank Rome Intl Chamber of Shipping (ICS) Royal Greenland A/S BP Intl Tankers Owners Pollution Fed. (ITOPF) Sanford Limited Cape Breton University JASCO Applied Sciences Shell Cape Cod Commercial Hook Fishermen’s Assn. L3 MariPro Shipping HK Forum Ltd Caris USA Inc. Lloyds Register Sinclair Knight Merz China Navigation Company/Swire Pacific Offshore Louisbourg Seafoods Southall Env’tal Assoc (SEA) CSA Ocean Sciences Inc. M3 Marine (Offshore Brokers) Pte Ltd SubCtech Det Norske Veritas (DNV) Manson Oceanographic Tai Chong Cheang (TCC) Steamship Co HK EcoStrategic Consultants Marinexplore Teck Resources EDP Renewables Marine Acoustics, Inc. TierraMar Consulting Eniram Mitsubishi Heavy Industries TOTAL ESRI Nautilus Minerals, Inc. Total Marine Solutions Executive MBA in Shipping/Logistics Noble Group Limited Twin Dolphins ExxonMobil N America Marine Env’t Protection Assn. Univ. Texas Marine Science Inst. FOB Zodiac Maritime

23 Port Reception Facility key points to tackling adequacy
Without causing delay to ships = know market share and break down by ships type (ST) using port Adequate to meet the needs of the ships = know ST waste streams generated/landed Port to ensure adequate facilities = to quantities and wastes landed ashore Does not provide mariners with a disincentive to use them; Contributes to the improvement of the marine environment = “allow for the ultimate disposal of ships’ wastes to take place in an environmentally appropriate way.”

24 PRF understood responsibility:
Port/terminal operators PRFs meets national & local waste handling permit requirements for environmental & public health and waste are managed so that wastes and residues removed from ships cannot readily enter the water Common discharges: solid waste, oily wastes, sewage, paint related wastes, recyclables Challenging waste streams: EGCS wash water, BW, gray water, electronics, hazardous wastes, economizer wash water, international garbage

25 Video links

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