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 To ensure all participant have improved confidence in the knowledge and delivery of the sensitive issues surrounding CSE  Resources.

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Presentation on theme: " To ensure all participant have improved confidence in the knowledge and delivery of the sensitive issues surrounding CSE  Resources."— Presentation transcript:

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2  To ensure all participant have improved confidence in the knowledge and delivery of the sensitive issues surrounding CSE  Resources

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4  Raise awareness across the board  Look for any possible indicators of CSE  Challenge thinking  Start conversations and discussion about relationships  Support where appropriate  Keep informed and up to date with procedures and information  Online Pupil data for your setting

5 Sexual exploitation of children and young people under 18 involves exploitative situations, contexts and relationships where young people (or a third person or persons) receive ‘something’ (e.g. food, accommodation, drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, affection, gifts, money) as a result of them performing, and/or another or others performing on them, sexual activities.

6  At least 1,400 children were subjected to appalling sexual exploitation in Rotherham between 1997 and 2013, a report has found.  Children as young as 11 were raped by multiple perpetrators, abducted, trafficked to other cities in England, beaten and intimidated, it said.  The report, commissioned by Rotherham Borough Council, revealed there had been three previous inquiries.report

7 Schools  8.9 Schools were a key element in the frontline of protecting children from sexual exploitation. Perpetrators targeted schools and there was evidence in the files (historically and up to the time of the Inquiry) that schools were proactive in alerting Risky Business, children’s social care and the Police to signs and evidence of exploitation.

8  8.10 From its inception, Risky Business provided training programmes to schools with a view to raising young people's awareness of CSE and its dangers and giving them a chance to voice concerns about their own situation. Workshops in schools covered grooming and the internet.

9 News today! “Community leaders will sit down later today to discuss the findings of a review into child sexual exploitation in the city. Stoke-on-Trent City Council commissioned the report in May after it was revealed that 27 children were sexually exploited in the city last year, 78 were at risk.” Stoke Sentinel

10 1000 children subjected to sexual exploitation each day* * The Child Sexual Exploitation – Gangs and Group Enquiry (CSEGG) 13 yrs average age of Child Sexual Exploitation* *Barnardos Children's Charity 80% of young people want better relationship education at secondary school* *Brook for Young People

11 © Foster & Brown Research 2014 Online safety: How much do they know about Grooming & how to keep safe? (Secondary phase n = 8,950) Just over half feel they have a lot of knowledge about how to keep safe from grooming online. Little difference between genders.

12 © Foster & Brown Research 2014 Online safety: How much do they know about Grooming & how to keep safe? Should young people my age be taught more? Just over half feel they should be taught more about this. Girls more so than boys.

13 © Foster & Brown Research 2014 Grooming: Have you ever met a Stanger in the real world that you first got to know online (Secondary phase n = 8,985) 12.4% say they have met a stranger in real life that they first got to know online, nearly a third (who met up with a stranger) went on their own to meet them. Again little gender difference.

14 © Foster & Brown Research 2014 Grooming: Have you ever met a Stanger in the real world that you first got to know online (Secondary phase n = 1,088) 12.4% say they have met a stranger in real life that they first got to know online, nearly a third (who met up with a stranger) went on their own to meet them. 60% took a friend.

15 © Foster & Brown Research 2014 Grooming: Met a Stanger in the real world that you first got to know online (Secondary phase n = 78) 12.4% say they have met a stranger in real life that they first got to know online, nearly a third (who met up with a stranger) went on their own to meet them. 60% took a friend.

16  It can happen to boys and girls  It can happen in rural and urban areas  It can happen face to face  It can happen online  It is a form of child abuse and should be treated as a child protection issue

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18  Going missing for periods of time or regularly returning home late  Disengagement from education  Appearing with unexplained gifts or new possessions  Peers and friends  Sexual health issues  Changes in temperament/depression  Drugs and alcohol misuse  Displaying inappropriate sexualised behaviours  Involvement in exploitative relationships or association with risky adults (Source: Barnardo’s ‘Puppet on a string’, 2011) Signs and indicators Sch/Col exercise – Pg 19 Love or Lies

19 Signs of child sexual exploitation 'being missed' Teachers, social workers and the police are missing the warning signs of children being targeted for sexual exploitation, a charity has said. Barnardo's said children who were being groomed often appeared with unexplained gifts or started engaging in risky behaviour. They also tended to start skipping school or becoming disruptive, it said. People working with children needed to be made aware of the "tell-tale signs", it added. These also include secretive use of mobile phones and the internet. Some children might use drugs or be encouraged to do so by those attempting to control them, it added. BBC News July 2010

20 Allocate to appropriate team to investigate The CSE Team Access and referral forms and take action with social care Investigate organised CSE where groups and gangs of individuals are involved in the sexual exploitation of children or localised (or on-street) grooming and internal trafficking Support educational establishments in preventative work Advice where appropriate

21 Request for service/referral Information gathering – single agency Is child at risk of CSE? Yes No Information Advice given

22  Can be located at protocolswww.gscb.org.uk/article/113294/Gloucestershire-procedures-and- protocols

23  Tool kit  Where to find it tershire-procedures-and-protocols

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26 “Nobody warned me about sexual exploitation, nobody warned me that there are lads who drive round in their posh cars and loud music, and try to groom girls. I didn’t warn my daughter. I want other parents to be aware.” (Parent, quoted)

27 Carlie was raped, physically and sexually abused over a four year period. She was introduced to adult perpetrators through other young women. She is 15 years old. She was groomed through alcohol, drugs and gifts. One perpetrator told her that he was a theatre producer and promised her an acting role. The perpetrators who were identified were previously known to the Police. Carlie associated with other young people who were involved in sexual exploitation.

28 CSE experiences can cause young people long term physical, mental and emotional damage and can significantly impact on their ability to make and sustain successful, stable relationships in the future.

29  Substance misuse  Unintended pregnancies  STI’s  Homelessness  Anxiety and depression  Crime  Victims of domestic violence This high lights the importance of prevention and early intervention to protect young people.

30  Gloucestershire Healthy Living and Learning(GHLL)  CSE Police Unit  Safe Guarding (GSCB)  School Nurses  Youth Mental Health First Aid – (GHLL)  Childline  NSPCC  Barnardos  GDVSAP  Youth Support Service

31  My Dangerous Loverboy – UKHT  Barnardos  NSPCC  Sex Education Forum  CEOP (Think u Know and Exploited)  Friend or foe? (Safe Guarding Children –Sheffield)  NWG (National working group for CSE)  UK Safer Internet Centre  Gloucestershire Exploitation Lesson  Chelsea’s Choice  Back-ground research (Girl A – Anonymous)  Holding On To You (Radio 4 drama)

32  Where are you delivering this work?  Size of group?  Mixed gender groups? Advantages/disadvantages  Age?  Should it be delivered to young people who have been part of work looking at healthy relationships and sexual health?  Children who have been identified at risk?  PSHE/Pastoral teams – discuss, share and cascade  Further training (GSCB)

33  Would you know how to support a young person – referring to specialist?  Make sure you are aware of safe guarding procedure in your establishment– disclosure  Referral form  GSCB – Gloucestershire Safe Guarding Children's Board

34 A continuous, progressive curriculum relevant to needs of students This will involve some introductory work before the introduction of the CSE topic  Healthy relationships  Staying safe  Sexual health

35 What preparation do you need to do before covering this sensitive topic? Teachers need to be prepared before it is delivered to young people so that they can support young people effectively. Be clear about procedures at your establishment if a young person discloses. Ensure other staff members are aware of topic being delivered.

36  GHLL/CSE Police Exploitation Lesson –  Year 8 students (12/13yrs) prior to having Chelsea’s Choice Play (Good starting point for topic)

37 What do these images have in common?

38 Exploitation

39  Unfair treatment of someone, or the use of a situation in a way that is wrong, in order to get some benefit for yourself  The process of making use of something so that you gain as much as possible from it  Manipulation, forced into taking part in something

40  Card sort – how risky is it?  Make young people aware of ‘risk’ and the need to assess situations and level of risk.

41  Produced by UKHTC (UK Human Trafficking Centre) in 2009 and reprinted in 2011 in association with SOCA (Serious Organised Crime Agency)   Know your audience – suggest yr9 (14yrs) and above  Based on information from specialist services, frontline practitioners and young people’s stories and experiences

42 In small groups discuss: o What do you know about Jade? o What do you know about Raz? o Can you identify any risks so far? o How could Jade minimise these risks?

43  What has happened to Jade?  Has Raz been grooming Jade? If so, how was he doing it?  Did this feel like a healthy relationship at first?  When did it stop feeling like that?  How could Jade have kept herself safe?

44  What if…  No, because…  A good night out/A safe night out board  Pressure points and strategies

45  What has happened to Jade now?  Is Jade a consenting party?  Could she have done anything to get away or keep herself safe?  What can Jade do now?

46  Something’s wrong  Helping Friends  Asking questions  Helping hands  Things I’m not happy about  Phone a friend/Draft a text message  Self assessments

47  Consider creative methods of delivery – such as graffiti, role play, art, questions in a hat, board games, thoughts in a box…  Have a credible delivery style that avoids judgements, uses plain language and concepts  Be responsive to their reactions  Distancing techniques to give them time to discuss in small groups  Get them to complete learning journals with action points  Get them to do their own self or risk assessment  Drama/dance

48  Deal with any questions or concerns  Give them permission/actively encourage them to talk about the issues  Tell them where to go if they want help  Get their thought s on the sessions  Get involved in designing future sessions End on a positive note – e.g. Disassociation games similar to ice breaker activities

49  Time and privacy for any young person affected by the issues  List of local and national resources  Clear understanding that if a young person discloses that they are being groomed or sexually exploited, your setting must make referrals to the police and social care without delay – you therefore need to be familiar with local policies

50  “Don’t let guys groom you. If they give you lots of stuff, or buy you drinks, don’t think that means they love you. Or if they take you to a hotel for the night, and they’re paying for it, it’s because they want something for it. I felt so lonely, I had no one to talk to, and that’s how I ended up with bad people, and bad things happened to me.” (Young victim, quoted by Children’s Society’)

51  Raising awareness in your own establishment (All staff and parent/carers)  Make people aware of screening tool

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