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An Era of Social Change How much can society change?

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Presentation on theme: "An Era of Social Change How much can society change?"— Presentation transcript:

1 An Era of Social Change How much can society change?

2 Latinos and Native Americans Seek Equality Main Idea Latinos and Native Americans confronted injustices in the 1960s Why it Matters Today Campaigns for civil rights and economic justice won better representation and opportunity for Latinos and Native Americans

3 The Latino Presence Grows During the 1960s, the Latino population in the U.S. grew from 3 million to more than 9 million. During the 1960s, the Latino population in the U.S. grew from 3 million to more than 9 million. Latinos of Varied Origins Latinos of Varied Origins Mexican Americans- Southwest Mexican Americans- Southwest Braceros- temporary workers Braceros- temporary workers Puerto Ricans Puerto Ricans Cubans- NY; fled because of Castro Cubans- NY; fled because of Castro Barrios- spanish-speaking neigborhoods Barrios- spanish-speaking neigborhoods

4 Latinos Fight for Change Latinos Farm Worker Movement Cesar Chavez UFWOC Cultural Change Brown Power Chicanos Political Power MAPA LA Razda Unida

5 Native Americans Struggle for Equality Native Americans are sometimes viewed as a single homogeneous group, despite the hundreds of distinct Native American tribes and nations in the U.S. Native Americans are sometimes viewed as a single homogeneous group, despite the hundreds of distinct Native American tribes and nations in the U.S. Native Americans Declaration of Indian Purpose Am. Indian Movement (AIM) Trail of Broken Treaties Indian Education Act Indian Self-Deter. Education Act

6 Women Fight for Equality Main Idea Through protests and marches, women confronted social and economic barriers in American society. Why it Matters Today The rise of the womens movement during the 1960s advanced womens place in the workforce and in society.

7 A New Womens Movement Arises During the 1950s, writer Betty Friedan seemed to be living the American dream. During the 1950s, writer Betty Friedan seemed to be living the American dream. The Feminine Mystique- addressed the problem that has no name. The Feminine Mystique- addressed the problem that has no name. The theory behind the womens movement of the 1960s was feminism, the belief the women should have economic, political, and social equality with men. The theory behind the womens movement of the 1960s was feminism, the belief the women should have economic, political, and social equality with men.

8 Womens Movement Women in The Workplace of 3 working up 40% Women & Activism Consciousness- Raising The Movement Emerges Feminine Mystique

9 The Movement Experiences Gains and Losses Gains & Losses N.O.W. Gloria Steinem Higher Education Act Roe vs. Wade Equal Rights Amendment (ERA)

10 The Movements Legacy The New Right and the womens movement clashed most dramatically over the ERA. The New Right and the womens movement clashed most dramatically over the ERA. The ERA went down in defeat. The ERA went down in defeat. Succeeded in expanding career opportunities for women. Succeeded in expanding career opportunities for women % of all medical school graduates and 5 % of law school graduates were women % of all medical school graduates and 5 % of law school graduates were women % % Women held 13.5 % of elected state offices as well as 24 seats in the U.S. Congress Women held 13.5 % of elected state offices as well as 24 seats in the U.S. Congress

11 Culture and Counterculture Main Idea The ideals and lifestyle of the counterculture challenged the traditional views of Americans. Why it Matters Today The music, art, and politics of the counterculture have left enduring marks on American society.

12 The Counterculture Counterculture- a movement made up mostly of white, middle-class college youth who had grown disillusioned with the war in Vietnam and injustices in America during the 1960s. Counterculture- a movement made up mostly of white, middle-class college youth who had grown disillusioned with the war in Vietnam and injustices in America during the 1960s. The Counterculture Beliefs Rejection of Mainstream Society; Opposed Vietnam; Society of peace, love, harmony Lifestyle Rock n Roll, outrageous clothing, Drug use, communal living, Haight-Ashbury Impact on Society Pop Art, Mens/womens fashions, Especially blue jeans, rock n roll music Conservative music

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14 A Changing Culture Although short-lived, some aspects of the counterculture-namely, its fine arts and social attitudes- left a more lasting imprint on the world. Although short-lived, some aspects of the counterculture-namely, its fine arts and social attitudes- left a more lasting imprint on the world. Counterculture Art Rock Music Changing Attitudes

15 The Conservative Response In the late 1960s, many believed that the country was losing its sense of right and wrong. In the late 1960s, many believed that the country was losing its sense of right and wrong. Richard Nixon Richard Nixon Conservatives attacked the counterculture Conservatives attacked the counterculture


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