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L EARN HOW K ENT S CHOOL D ISTRICT IS PRIORITIZING STAFF DEVELOPMENT AND THEIR DISTRICT INITIATIVES TO MEET THE NEEDS OF THE S OUTH K ING C OUNTY ’ S GROWING.

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Presentation on theme: "L EARN HOW K ENT S CHOOL D ISTRICT IS PRIORITIZING STAFF DEVELOPMENT AND THEIR DISTRICT INITIATIVES TO MEET THE NEEDS OF THE S OUTH K ING C OUNTY ’ S GROWING."— Presentation transcript:

1 L EARN HOW K ENT S CHOOL D ISTRICT IS PRIORITIZING STAFF DEVELOPMENT AND THEIR DISTRICT INITIATIVES TO MEET THE NEEDS OF THE S OUTH K ING C OUNTY ’ S GROWING R EFUGEE /ELL POPULATION Rona Popp Ipek Bulduk-Cooley Annie Abraham 1

2 ELL D EMOGRAPHICS 2 Approximately 91,000 ELL students in SY (84,854 funded FTEs) Of those, 67% were Spanish speakers 197 school districts serve ELL students About 46 school districts serve students with 20 or more language groups 89% in Sheltered Instruction or English as a Second Language Instruction KSD has approximately 4,342 eligible ELL students (1/3/2011) 34% are Spanish, followed by Punjabi & Ukrainian- 8%, Vietnamese –7%, Somali - 6% (Skyward) 40 KSD schools serve ELL students Over 120 languages – KSD is one of 20 districts in Washington KSD is minority majority district % of ELL students are at L2 and L3 level – served in content classroom with core content area support from ELL 2. 13% L1’s- served in Newcomer Language Acquisition support Washington State - 09/10Kent School District - 1/3/11

3 ELL C OUNT BY C HART 10/11 3

4 KSD D EMOGRAPHICS 09/10 4

5 ELL E NROLLMENT BY D ISTRICT 5

6 S TATE ELL S M EETING S TATE T ARGETS ELLs meeting state targets for reading, writing and math 6

7 KSD ELL S M EETING S TATE T ARGETS KSD ELLs meeting state targets for reading, writing, and math 7

8 M EASURES OF P ROGRAM 09/10 MSP/HSPE met standards – WA vs. KSD data 8 Washington State vs. KSDGrades Met All 3 AMAOsGrade Span Met Math Standard Met Reading Standard Met AMO 3 % Met Reading standard % Met Math standard % Met Writing standard Washington State Total TotalNo 21%17%32% 3 3-5No 31%28% 6 6-8No 15%12% 10 No 24%10%47% Kent School DistrictTotalNo Yes20%19%32% 3 3-5Yes 33% 6 6-8Yes 17% 10 NR 19%11%49%

9 K ENT S CHOOL D ISTRICT I NITIATIVES : Research Based Programs/Resources DST (District Support Team) Tiered Interventions (district wide) SIOP – Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (district wide) Cultural Competency skills training (district wide) ELD (English Language Development) standards (district wide) Our Way to English (Elementary ELL program resource Shining Star (Secondary ELL program resource) Services Refugee Transition Center - Transition of refugee students and families Parent and community involvement Interpreters and translations Language Line College and Career Readiness 9

10 F IVE TYPOLOGY OF ELL S A) Newcomers with fluency in their native language with formal native language education. B)Newcomers who are not fluent in their native language and without formal education. C) ELL students who are processing linguistically and academically according to the relative expectations. D) ELL students who have exited the program and have high performing social language and still struggle in academic language. E) Long term ELLs who struggle to exit their ELL category, and who continue to fail or drop our at the disproportionately high levels. 10

11 T OP I NTERPRETER L ANGUAGES 11

12 T RANSITION INTO A N EW W ORLD : T HE R EFUGEE T RANSITION C ENTER S TORY 12

13 Who is frustrated? The Teacher and /or The Student 13

14 D IFFERENTIATE I NSTRUCTION ! B UT A CCORDING TO WHAT ? AND HOW? Can we make decisions about how to best serve ELL students without understanding their unique needs? Do we really know how to differentiate the instruction and modify the assessment? Do we have the expertise and time to create grade and content- appropriate curriculum materials according the to the students needs? Are we really using each other as resources? 14

15 C OMPLETE, ACCURATE INFO IS NEEDED ! W E HAVE THE DATA AND NOW WHAT? Are we using the data about our ELL students in multiple ways? Is it still only ELL teachers` responsibility to track the students achievement by using the data? Are all that information filtered down to classroom teacher or reached them in ways they could readily make sense of it? How can school and district data systems be fine tuned and better utilized to support teachers and ELL staff in the instruction of ELL students? 15

16 A LIGNMENT, I NTEGRATION AND C OORDINATION OF SUPPORT Professional development Appropriate curriculum and materials Collaboration Staff Support (through specialists, coaches, paras and translators) Clear communication among all stakeholders- district officials, principals, teachers and support staff. 16

17 T RAINING OR THE RIGHT T RAINING ! Random implications or intentional instructional practices? Not only the instruction for ELL students should be differentiated but also professional learning opportunities need to be differentiated to meet the many and varied needs of teachers who work with ELL students. How should we present the training to the teachers to get all staff members on board? Not just the classroom teachers! 17

18 G OAL : T O DEVELOP A PD P LAN FOR C ERTIFICATED S TAFF TO LEARN THE ELD S TANDARDS Considerations: Systemic Approach Integrated with the Standards Based Classroom Model and with the Power Standards (also in development) Solicit input from a variety of certificated representatives Identify tentative cost and budget source 18

19 NameRepresentative GroupSchool/Department David RadfordCoach/Administrative InternKM Samantha KetoverCoach/Administrative InternKM Melanie StreyElementary PrincipalHE Chad GoldenElementary PrincipalCV Tricia HoyleElementary PrincipalFW Jeff PelzelMiddle School PrincipalMK Jim SchiechlMiddle School PrincipalMM Dylan SmithHigh School Assistant PrincipalKL Doug HostetterHigh School PrincipalKW Ipek Bulduk-CooleySpecial Services - ELLSS Annie AbrahamSpecial Services - ELLSS Jan MayesLanguage Arts CoordinatorIS Tami OhoyoMath CoordinatorIS Bruce KellyScience CoordinatorIS Karen RobertsAchievement AnalystIS Carolyn TrelevenDirector Standards Based InstructionIS Steve GillAssociate CoachSS Thad WilliamsKR TBDHeritage University ELL Cert Program TBDHeritage University ELL Cert Program 19 District Wide Representatives

20 W HAT ARE ELD STANDARDS FROM THE T EACHERS ` POINT OF VIEW ? One more thing to deal with in addition many other overwhelming tasks? OR a magical prescription? OR a very helpful tool? 20

21 ELD S TANDARDS AND KSD These standards attempt to codify what students at various levels of English Proficiency should know and be able to do. 21

22 C REATING A WARENESS ABOUT The nature and stages of language acquisition & Proficiency levels How ELD standards are similar to and different from the GLES Bridging ELDs to SIOP (Differentiate a lesson and strategies for working with struggling learners) i. Lesson planning ii. Modeling lessons iii. Interpreting assessment information 22

23 KSD’ S SIOP I MPLEMENTATION You must be the change you wish to see in the world. —Gandhi

24 A CADEMIC L ITERACY S TATISTICS Only 30% of all secondary students read proficiently, but for students of color, the situation is worse: 89% of Hispanic students and 86% of African American middle and high school students read below grade level (Perie, Grigg, & Donahue, 2005). The foundation of school success is academic literacy in English and is a prerequisite in the attainment of content standards ( Lemke, 1988). What does KSD’s academic literacy statistics look like? 24

25 D EMOGRAPHIC C ONTEXT FOR A SSESSMENT R ESULTS S PRING

26 R EADING D ISPARITIES – ELL P ERCENTAGE OF S TUDENTS M EETING S TANDARD ON WASL Disparity in Meeting Reading Standard 39 Grade 4: 39 points 54 Grade 7: 54 points 41 Grade 10: 41 points 26

27 M ATH D ISPARITIES – ELL P ERCENTAGE OF S TUDENTS M EETING S TANDARD ON THE WASL Disparity in Meeting Math Standard 35 Grade 4: 35 points 52 Grade 7: 52 points 42 Grade 10: 42 points 27

28 W RITING D ISPARITIES – ELL P ERCENTAGE OF S TUDENTS M EETING S TANDARD ON THE WASL Disparity in Meeting Writing Standard 28 Grade 4: 28 points 49 Grade 7: 49 points 37 Grade 10: 37 points 28

29 I F WE REALLY BELIEVE THAT ALL CHILDREN CAN LEARN, THEN … it is not acceptable for any child to fail to learn

30 KSD - L AYING THE F OUNDATION In 2008, KSD analyzed their AYP data: The data was clear. We needed to create a common focus. – Establish need for SIOP – Connect with what the district is already doing (initiatives)? – Establish that this is not another fad or thing to do.

31 R ESEARCH ON SIOP Students with limited English proficiency, who receive instruction in a classroom with a SIOP ‐ trained teacher, will perform better on end- of ‐ year standardized testing than comparable students who are in classrooms with non ‐ SIOP ‐ trained teachers.

32 Why was the SIOP model selected for KSD? 1) Sheltered instruction doesn’t require teachers to throw away their favorite techniques, or add copious new elements to their teaching. 2) Sheltered instruction brings together what to teach by providing an approach for how to teach it. (Echevarria, Vogt, Short, 2000 )

33 3) OSPI, PSESD & the higher institutions are supporting SIOP with professional development opportunities. Why was the SIOP model selected for KSD?

34 KSD CHOSE SIOP O NLINE T RAINING The SIOP Online Training for Teachers is an online, cost-effective and schedule-friendly option, with no travel required. It offers teachers the opportunity to build their SIOP knowledge and expand the SIOP implementation in their schools while still receiving high-quality instruction and guidance. The online training helps educators enhance instruction for English learners & all struggling learners. As new staff comes in, modules are already built- in.

35 SIOP O NLINE T RAINING FOR KSD TARGET AUDIENCE: School & District Administrators, Coaches & Specialists, K-12 Teachers, Staff Development Specialists, ELL teachers & Paraeducators

36 SIOP P ROFESSIONAL D EVELOPMENT Initial Training (building in-house capacity)- 3 or 2 day training – Administrators and Specialists – Principals – ELL Teachers Multiple levels of SIOP training ( 3 YEAR PHASE) – All teachers & Select Paraeducators – New teachers & administrative staff & paraeducators

37 P RINCIPAL AS SIOP I NSTRUCTIONAL L EADER Creating buy-in Supporting the training &implementation Evaluation and refinement of SIOP “The greatest success is found where administrators understand SIOP and actively support implementation through things such as team planning.”

38 SIOP O NLINE M ODULES 7-module institute -7 sessions where participants complete a series of assignments on their own schedule as well meeting as a virtual group to collaborate, discuss, and share information with their colleagues. The wrap-up 1 hour modules for each modules are led by individual principals (who have received the SIOP training) in the topic. All participants receive the Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners book and electronic resources to support their learning.

39 SIOP O NLINE T RAINING Participants learn the SIOP Model through SIOP classroom lessons on video, SIOP author discussions on video, and readings from the chapters as well as other online resources. Cultural competency modules have been added to the SIOP model – it’s the “WHY?” of teaching ELLs It's been a powerful new learning model for educators with limited time or budget for travel.

40 OUTCOMES FOR SIOP O NLINE T RAINING By the end of the 7-module training (2011/12), staff will be able to: Understand the SIOP Model and its effectiveness with English learners and all students Identify learning and instructional strategies that are appropriate for all struggling learners Learn how the SIOP Model can be incorporated into lesson planning Identify ways to increase student interaction in the classroom Identify techniques to review content and assess student understanding

41 M OODLE I NTRODUCTION

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44 F UTURE G OALS : Identification and training of SIOP Coach for each building Continue SIOP lesson plans with the Observation Protocol – co-teaching and modeling (fidelity of implementation) * Reach out to more content teachers – new and existing

45 E VERYTHING STARTS WITH OWNERSHIP ! 45 Starting Again: Stories of Refugee YouthStarting Again: Stories of Refugee Youth,

46 T HANK YOU ! 46 Questions ?


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