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O.de Funded by in cooperation with Expert meeting on biodiversity standards and strategies for sustainable cultivation of biomass for non-food purposes.

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Presentation on theme: "O.de Funded by in cooperation with Expert meeting on biodiversity standards and strategies for sustainable cultivation of biomass for non-food purposes."— Presentation transcript:

1 o.de Funded by in cooperation with Expert meeting on biodiversity standards and strategies for sustainable cultivation of biomass for non-food purposes March 2008, Isle of Vilm, Germany Dr. Klaus Hennenberg, Uwe R. Fritsche Energy & Climate Division Öko-Institut e.V. (Institute for applied Ecology), Darmstadt Office Brief Input on Biodiversity and Land Use (Working Group 1)

2 o.de Funded by in cooperation with Main Threats to Biodiversity -Most prominent: Loss of habitats due to direct and indirect land- use change -Other Factors: Habitat fragmentation and isolation, land-use intensification and overexploitation, species invasions as well as impacts of climate change Protection of biodiversity requires systematic planning strategies for managing landscapes (production + protection) target of CBD (2002): significant reduction of the rate of biodiversity loss by  CBD-instruments: Ecosystem Approach, Programmes of Work on Protected Areas, on Agricultural and Forest Biodiversity, …

3 o.de Funded by in cooperation with Risk Mitigation Strategy A risk mitigation strategy should achieve a strong reduction of additional pressure on biodiversity by bioenergy production. Key issues are: -Protection of natural habitats (PA, HCV, …) -Use of residuals and wastes -Biomass production in prior areas (degraded, abandoned land) -Sustainable cultivation of biomass  Keep negative effects of bioenergy production out of areas potentially needed for the protection of biodiversity within systematic conservation planning Bioenergy production – as an additional land-use form – bears the risk to enhance the unsustainable use of natural resources, and especially biodiversity.

4 o.de Funded by in cooperation with Global Land Categories Used landUnused land -areas characterized by a significant natural conservation value (biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, etc.) -though worth to be protected currently have no conservation status -no internationally accepted definition Areas of High Natural Conservation Value (HNCV) -degraded land: former suitable land, not any more used e.g., for agriculture -degraded land still has the potential to be restored by adequate measures -abandoned farmland: former agriculture land, but unused due to economical or political reasons -...prior areas for biomass production to reduce land competition… Degraded land and abandoned farmland -protection and maintenance of biodiversity, agrobiodiversity, and of natural and associated cultural resources -managed through legal or other effective means Protected Areas (PA)

5 o.de Funded by in cooperation with Suggested Framework

6 o.de Funded by in cooperation with HCV (Areas of High Conservation Value) § 3 German Biofuels Sustainability Ordinance (BioNachV) …globally or nationally significant accumulation of …biological diversity …rare, threatened or endangered ecosystems… …fundamental protective functions. High nature value farmland:... comprises the core areas of biological diversity in agricultural landscapes (extensive farming practices… high species and habitat diversity…species of conservation concern) (EEA 2005). High Conservation Value Forests (HCVF): (1)…significant concentrations of biodiversity values… (2)…viable populations of…naturally occurring species… (3)…rare, threatened or endangered ecosystems. (4)…basic services… (5)…basic needs of local communities… (6)…traditional cultural identity… (FSC 2000)  HCV are the “matrix” for priority setting (e.g. Key Biodiversity Area Concept and Protected Area Network Planning)  HCV address not exclusively biodiversity  Global databases on biodiversity may be useful start to identify HCV. BUT:  Internationally accepted definition of the term HCV is absent  Clear indicators are needed  Many global and even local data are to coarse in resolution (small-scale habitats)  Specification necessary within ecological meaningful units  A habitat currently not considered as HCV may become HCV due to loss of areas of this habitat (monitoring/up-data or systematic planning?)

7 o.de Funded by in cooperation with Classical crops (food, fodder, fiber) Crops for bioenergy Indirect land-use change caused by displacement …Indirect Land-Use Change Not Tackled! Classical crops (food, fodder, fiber)

8 o.de Funded by in cooperation with Towards Recommendation for CBD-COP 9 …Preparation of a risk mitigation strategy to protect biodiversity from negative effects caused by bioenergy production …Initiation of a program of work to define HCV and their respective indicators …Setting up spatial datasets (GIS) to identify and to map PA and HCV as well as land use restrictions (As a first step conservative global “default maps” for categories?) …Extending the risk mitigation strategy to other land-use forms to tackle negative effects from indirect land-use change due to displacement …Initiation of pilot applications for specification on a national scale

9 o.de Funded by in cooperation with Thank You for Attention…

10 o.de Funded by in cooperation with Definitions Biological diversity (=biodiversity) (CBD, article 2)  variability among living organisms from all sources  including, inter alia, terrestrial, marine and other aquatic ecosystems and the ecological complexes of which they are part  this includes diversity within species, between species and of ecosystems. Agricultural biodiversity (=agrobiodiversity) (FAO/CBD Workshop 1998)  variety and variability of animals, plants and micro-organisms which are necessary to sustain key functions of the agro-ecosystem its structure and processes for, and in support of, food production and food security.  The term agricultural biodiversity encompasses within-species, species and ecosystem diversity.

11 o.de Funded by in cooperation with Global Land Categories Definition of Protected Areas IUCN: Protected Areas are areas “of land and/or sea especially dedicated to the protection and maintenance of biodiversity, and of natural and associated cultural resources, and managed through legal or other effective means”. CBD: Protected Area as “a geographically defined area that is designated or regulated and managed to achieve specific conservation objectives”.  Instrument to protect natural resources including biodiversity (IUCN, WCMC, CBD)  Cornerstones of regional conservation strategies  Represent the biodiversity of each region  Separate this biodiversity from processes that threaten its persistence  International Databases: World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA), UN List of Protected Areas Protected Areas BUT:  Strategies for managing whole landscapes (production + protection) are needed for the protection of biodiversity.  Large number species, ecosystems and ecological processes are not yet adequately protected (gap analysis)


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