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The STEM Partnership John Holman Director, National Science Learning Centre National STEM Director, DCSF/ DIUS.

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Presentation on theme: "The STEM Partnership John Holman Director, National Science Learning Centre National STEM Director, DCSF/ DIUS."— Presentation transcript:

1 The STEM Partnership John Holman Director, National Science Learning Centre National STEM Director, DCSF/ DIUS

2 Questions for NAIGS What is the ‘STEM agenda’? What’s in it for schools and colleges? How much do schools and colleges need to know about the Action Programmes framework? How should it be communicated to them? What are the opportunities arising from the new Masters of Teaching and Learning?

3 STEM skills are valuable, but in short supply 59% of employers are having difficulty recruiting enough STEM-skilled individuals to meet their needs Larger firms are looking overseas for STEM skills, with 36% recruiting from India and 24% from China Employers are committed to encouraging more young people to study STEM CBI education and skills survey 2008

4 STEM teaching has many supporters STEM teaching in schools and colleges GovernmentFoundationsAcademiaIndustry

5 What do we agree on? We need good attainment and good engagement: - more young people doing well in STEM subjects and more wanting to continue studying them.

6 Students’ attitudes to science: 800 Year 9 students aged 14 Two-thirds of students think science has a positive influence on society. 25% of students think that it would be good to have a job as a scientist, but almost 33% indicate that they definitely do not want a job as a scientist. 85% of students believe it is important for the country to have well qualified scientists – though most do not want a job involving science themselves. Judith Bennett, University of York for the National Science Learning Centre. Surveys in 2006 and 2007

7 PISA 2006 Programme for International Student Assessment 30 countries from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) 27 partner countries 2006 study, results published December 2007

8 PISA 2006 Science oUK performance is significantly above the OECD average o7 countries (including Japan) performed significantly higher than England o13 countries (including Germany) are not significantly different from England o36 countries (including France and USA) performed significantly worse than England

9 PISA 2006 Science is valuable for me percentage of students agreeing with positive statements about the personal value of science OECD average UKUSAGermanyJapan

10 PISA 2006 I would like a career in science percentage of students agreeing with statements about the value of a career in science OECD average UKUSAGermanyJapan

11 Declining/static trend in A level entries for physics, chemistry and maths over the last 30 years Entries shown as a proportion of the population aged 17 to take into account changes in the size of the cohort A level entries

12 Integrating STEM

13 S T E M inside the classroom

14 S TE M outside the classroom

15 Integrating STEM 1.Integrating the teaching of S, T, E and M within schools and colleges 2.Integrating STEM teaching in schools with the world outside 3.Integrating the efforts of partners

16 The concept: Where we are moving from Government funded initiatives Non-Government funded initiatives

17 The Concept: 200 or so initiatives sorted into 11 Action Programmes

18 Priorities (1) Get the curriculum right Get the education infrastructure right

19 Priorities (2) Get the right teachers Provide excellent professional development for teachers Enhance and enrich the STEM curriculum Show what rich careers STEM qualifications can lead to The benefits of partnership Get the right teachers Provide excellent professional development for teachers Enhance and enrich the STEM curriculum Show what rich careers STEM qualifications can lead to The benefits of partnership

20 How the world’s best-performing school systems come out on top McKinsey, September 2007 Three things matter most oGetting the right people to become teachers oDeveloping them into effective instructors oEnsuring the system is able to deliver the best possible instruction for every child

21 How the world’s best-performing school systems come out on top McKinsey, September 2007 ‘Above all, the top performing systems demonstrate that the quality of an education system depends ultimately on the quality of its teachers’

22 Get the right teachers Action Programme 1Improving the recruitment of teachers and lecturers in shortage subjects Lead organisation: the Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA)

23 Action Programme 1 Improving the recruitment of teachers and lecturers in shortage subjects Transition to Teaching: TDA-led programme to get industry people into teaching – especially STEM subjects back

24 Provide excellent professional development for teachers Action Programme 2Improving teaching and learning through CPD for mathematics teachers Lead organisation: the National Centre for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics Action Programme 3Improving teaching and learning through CPD for science teachers Lead organisation: the National Science Learning Centre

25 Action Programme 3 Improving teaching and learning through CPD for science teachers First meeting of National Science CPD committee 22 May 2008: objective to share intelligence and identify priorities Regional science CPD meetings taking place during July: objective to share regional intelligence and feed back to national committee Question for NAIGS: what are the opportunities arising from the new Masters of Teaching and Learning?Masters of Teaching and Learning? back

26 Enhance and enrich the STEM curriculum Action Programme 5Enhancing and enriching the science curriculum. Lead Organisation: SCORE (convened by The Royal Society) Action Programme 6Enhancing and enriching the teaching of engineering and technology across the curriculum Lead Organisation: Royal Academy of Engineering Action Programme 7Enhancing and enriching the teaching of mathematics. Lead Organisation: Advisory Committee on Mathematics Education (ACME)

27 Action Programme 5 Enhancing and enriching the science curriculum. Directories of enhancement and enrichment opportunities being produced by BA/ RI SCORE is the strategic lead body for science Hard copy directories into schools in September. Web copies updated continuously back

28 Show what rich careers STEM qualifications can lead to Action Programme 8Improving the quality of advice and guidance for students (and their teachers and parents) about STEM careers, to inform subject choice. Lead organisation: the National STEM Careers Co-ordinator at Sheffield Hallam University back

29 The benefits of partnership Working together towards common priorities Concentrating resources instead of dispersing them Widening expertise Sharing information about what works Being smarter about working with schools and collegesBeing smarter about working with schools and colleges

30 Being smarter about working with schools and colleges From September, Secondary National Strategy will be piloting a service for non- government partners to help them segment and target groups of schools which would benefit from support

31 Questions for NAIGS What is the ‘STEM agenda’? What’s in it for schools and colleges? How much do schools and colleges need to know about the Action Programmes framework? How should it be communicated to them? What are the opportunities arising from the new Masters of Teaching and Learning?

32 The Master of Teaching and Learning (MTL) MBA-style Masters qualification for all newly-starting teachers Modular, with credit accumulation To be acquired in first 5 years of teaching To be piloted in north-west from September 2009 back


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