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02.24.12 Transitioning to the Common Core Trinity County Office of Education August 15, 2012 Mathematics.

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Presentation on theme: "02.24.12 Transitioning to the Common Core Trinity County Office of Education August 15, 2012 Mathematics."— Presentation transcript:

1 Transitioning to the Common Core Trinity County Office of Education August 15, 2012 Mathematics

2 Agenda Welcome and Agenda Review Warm-Up Activity Introduction - CCSS CCSS Math – Standards Design CCSS Math – Practice and Instruction CCSS Math – Materials and Alignment Assessment Planning for Implementation 2

3 Binder Resources CISC Math Powerpoint Standards for Mathematical Practice Facilitating Mathematical Thinking with Effective Questions Questions for Planning and Observation SBAC Powerpoint Sample SBAC Assessment Items Article: “Teaching in Grades 3 and 4: How is each Common Core State Standard different from each old objective?” Article: “10 Practical Tips for Making Fractions Come Alive and Make Sense” California Common Core State Standards – Math 3

4 Handouts Standards for Mathematical Practice (laminated) Facilitating Mathematical Thinking with Effective Questions (laminated) Activity Worksheets: Table Pattern Task, Grade Level Tasks, Next Steps CCSS Standards Implementation Worksheet 4

5 English Learners and the Common Core State Standards The toolkit is an introduction and guide to initial implementation. Additional intentional support for English learners is critical. Work grounded in the revised English Language Development (ELD) standards will be necessary. 5

6 KWL Chart What I already KNOW about the Common Core State Standards What I WOULD like to learn about the Common Core State Standards What I LEARNED about the Common Core State Standards 2011 © CA County Superintendents Educational Services Association 6

7 States that Adopted © Copyright National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers. All rights reserved. 7

8 Why? To ensure that our students are… meeting college and career expectations (Text Complexity needs to be increased K-12); provided a vision of what it means to be an academically literate person in the twenty-first century; prepared to succeed in our global economy and society; and provided with rigorous content and applications of higher knowledge through higher order thinking skills © CA County Superintendents Educational Services Association 8

9 Benefits Internationally benchmarked Evidence and research-based Expectations clear to students, parents, teachers, and the general public Consistent expectations for all 2011 © CA County Superintendents Educational Services Association 9

10 ELA College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards Mathematics Standards for Mathematical Practice Heart and Soul 2011 © CA County Superintendents Educational Services Association 10

11 Lexile Framework © for Reading Study Summary of Text Lexile Measures Text Lexile Measure (L) High School Literature College Literature High School Textbooks College Textbooks Military Personal Use Entry-Level Occupations SAT 1, ACT, AP* * Source of National Test Data: MetaMetrics Interquartile Ranges Shown (25% - 75%) 11

12 5th Grade Collaborative Conversations Engage effectively in collaborative discussions (one-on- one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing one’s own clearly. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. Pose and respond to specific questions by making comments that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others. Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from discussions © CA County Superintendents Educational Services Association 12

13 Integrating Media Sources Reading Standards for Informational Text, Grade 6 7. Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue. Writing Standards, Grade 6 6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of three pages in a single sitting © CA County Superintendents Educational Services Association 13

14 Standards for Mathematical Practice “The Standards for Mathematical Practice describe varieties of expertise that mathematics educators at all levels should seek to develop in their students. These practices rest on important ‘processes and proficiencies’ with longstanding importance in mathematics education.” National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers (2010) Common Core State Standards for Mathematics 14

15 Underlying Frameworks National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Five Process Standards Problem Solving Reasoning and Proof Communication Connections Representations National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (2000) Principles and Standards for School Mathematics 15

16 Underlying Frameworks Strands of Mathematical Proficiency National Research Council (2001) Adding It Up Strategic Competence Adaptive Reasoning Conceptual Understanding Productive Disposition Procedural Fluency 16

17 Part 1: Standards for Mathematical Practice 1.Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them …start by explaining the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution 2.Reason abstractly and quantitatively …make sense of quantities and their relationships to problem situations 3.Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others …understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments 4.Model with mathematics …can apply the mathematics they know to solve problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace 2011 © CA County Superintendents Educational Services Association 17

18 Part 2: Standards for Mathematical Practice 5.Use appropriate tools strategically …consider the available tools when solving a mathematical problem 6.Attend to precision …communicate precisely using clear definitions and calculate accurately and efficiently 7.Look for and make use of structure …look closely to discern a pattern or structure 8.Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning …notice if calculations are repeated, and look for both general methods and for shortcuts 2011 © CA County Superintendents Educational Services Association 18

19 Standards for Mathematical Practice Locate the CCSS for Mathematics and read the first three words for each mathematical practice and notice the similarities. What do they begin with? Mathematically proficient students… Briars & Mitchell (2010) Getting Started with the Common Core State Standards 19

20 Standards for Mathematical Practice Locate and read the handout, Standards for Mathematical Practice. Discuss the importance of the verbs in the practices and how they define the habits of mind demonstrated by a mathematically proficient student. 20

21 Standards for Mathematical Practice The Eight Standards for Mathematical Practice place an emphasis on student demonstrations of learning that describe the thinking processes, habits of mind, and dispositions that students need to develop. adapted from Briars & Mitchell (2010) Getting Started with the Common Core State Standards 21

22 Domains Distribution (K-8) Findell & Foughty (2011) College and Career-Readiness through the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics 22

23 Focusing Attention Within Number and Operations Briars & Mitchell (2010) Getting Started with the Common Core State Standards Operations and Algebraic Thinking Number and Operations - Base Ten Number and Operations - Fractions Expressions and Equations The Number System Algebra K-56-8High School 23

24 California Grade 8 Options Goal for 8th grade students is Algebra 1. Two sets of standards for 8th grade – Standards for Algebra 1 (CA addition to the CCSS) 8th grade Common Core Standards for Mathematics – 8th grade Common Core Finalize preparation for students in high school © CA County Superintendents Educational Services Association 24

25 Mathematics Standards for High School Arranged by conceptual categories (not by course): Number and Quantity (p. 49) Algebra (p. 52) Functions (p. 56) Modeling (p. 60) Geometry (p. 62) Statistics and Probability (p. 67) adapted from Foster (2011) Assessment for Learning 25

26 High School Two Mathematics Pathways TRADITIONAL Pathway (Typical in U.S.) 2 Algebra courses, 1 Geometry course, with Probability and Statistics interwoven INTEGRATED Pathway (Typical outside of U.S.) 3 courses that attend to Algebra, Geometry, and Probability and Statistics each year HS Algebra I Mathematics I Geometry Mathematics II Algebra II Mathematics III Courses in higher level mathematics: Precalculus, Calculus*, Advanced Statistics, Discrete Mathematics, Advanced Quantitative Reasoning, or courses designed for career technical programs of study. Courses in higher level mathematics: Precalculus, Calculus*, Advanced Statistics, Discrete Mathematics, Advanced Quantitative Reasoning, or courses designed for career technical programs of study. adapted from 2011 © CA County Superintendents Educational Services Association 26

27 Getting to Calculus Sooner: Two Compacted Pathways Traditional Compacted Pathway : complete content of 7th, 8th, and HS Algebra I in grades 7 (Compacted 7th Grade) and 8 (8th Grade Algebra I) enabling them to finish Algebra II by the end of the sophomore year. Integrated Compacted Pathway : complete content of 7th, 8th, and Mathematics I in grades 7 (Compacted 7th Grade) and 8 (8th Grade Mathematics I), enabling them to complete Mathematics III by the end of the sophomore year Both prepare students for Precalculus in their junior year and Calculus in their senior year. 27

28 Format of the Overview Domains: Overarching ideas that connect topics across the grades Clusters: Illustrate the progression of increasing complexity from grade to grade © Copyright National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers. All rights reserved. 28

29 Format of the Standards © Copyright National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers. All rights reserved. 29

30 Format of the Standards California’s 15% Addition © Copyright National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers. All rights reserved. California’s 15% Addition 30

31 Assessment: What We Know Assessments will begin in California is a governing state in the SMARTER Balanced Assessment Consortium. Assessments will include: – Computer Adaptive Assessments (interim & summative) – Performance Assessments (interim & summative) Selected Response Constructed Response Extended Performance Assessments 31

32 Common Core State Standards Implementation Considerations All Teachers – Scaffold comprehension of increasingly complex texts – Integrate media sources into instructional activities – Support/monitor informal talk ELA Teachers – Teach more informational text – Teach how a wide variety of forms fall into three overarching modes of writing: Argument, Expository, and Narrative Science and History Teachers – Teach Reading and Writing skills in their content areas explicitly Mathematics Teachers – Teach the habits of mind that students need to develop a deep, flexible, and enduring understanding of mathematics 32

33 Reflection Locate the KWL chart you began earlier in the training. Complete the third column. Discuss with a partner. 33

34 Toolkit Modules Module 1: Overview (3 hours) Module 2: Content and Curriculum (90 minutes each) – ELA, K-12 – Additional Mini-Modules (60 minutes): Informational Text; Writing; Text Complexity; Collaboration, Research, and Use of Media – Mathematics, K-8 – Mathematics, 6-12 Module 3: Instruction (3 hours each) – ELA and Mathematics, K-5 – ELA only: Additional Mini-Modules (60 minutes): Informational Text; Writing; Text Complexity; Collaboration, Research, and Use of Media – ELA, 6-12 – Mathematics, 6-12 Module 4: Instructional Materials (3 hours each) – ELA and Mathematics, K-5 – ELA, 6-12 (3 hours) – Mathematics,

35 Effective Instruction “A long line of students has established that the single most important school influence on student learning is the quality of the teacher.” as presented by Linda Darling-Hammond (2007) How would you describe a classroom where effective instruction and learning is taking place? 35

36 California Standards for the Teaching Profession Engaging and supporting all students – Connect to students’ prior knowledge – Use a variety of instructional strategies – Promote autonomy, interaction, and choice – Engage students in critical thinking/problem solving – Engage students in reflecting on their learning Understanding and organizing content – Organize curriculum to support understanding – Interrelate ideas and information 36

37 California Standards for the Teaching Profession Planning instruction – Establish clear goals for student learning – Design short- and long-term plans – Modify plans according to student needs Assessing student learning – Collect and use multiple sources of information – Use results to guide instruction – Involve students in assessing their own learning 37

38 Learning Pyramid 38 adapted from Ntl Institute for Applied Behavioral Science (n.d.) Active Learning Passive Learning

39 Rigor/Relevance Framework ® International Center for Leadership in Education (n.d.) 39

40 3 Apply knowledge across disciplines 4 Apply to real-world predictable situation 5 Apply to real-world unpredictable situation Application3 Analysis4 Evaluation6 D Adaptation Quadrant D: Adaptation International Center for Leadership in Education (n.d.) Synthesis5 Students think in complex ways and apply acquired knowledge and skills, even when confronted with perplexing unknowns, to find creative solutions and take action that further develops their skills and knowledge. 40

41 Quadrant D Verbs evaluate validate justify rate referee infer rank dramatize argue conclude Products evaluation newspaper estimation trial editorial radio program Play collage machine adaptation poem debate invention 41

42 1 Knowledge in one discipline 2 Apply Knowledge in one discipline Application3 Analysis4 Evaluation6 C Assimilation Quadrant C: Assimilation International Center for Leadership in Education (n.d.) Synthesis5 Students extend and refine their knowledge so that they can use it automatically and routinely to analyze and solve problems and create solutions. 42

43 Quadrant C Verbs sequence annotate examine report criticize paraphrase calculate expand summarize classify diagram Products essay abstract blueprint inventory report plan chart questionnaire classification diagram discussion collection annotation 43

44 3 Apply knowledge across disciplines 4 Apply to real-world predictable situation 5 Apply to real-world unpredictable situation Awareness1 Comprehension 2 B Application Quadrant B: Application International Center for Leadership in Education (n.d.) Application 3 Students use acquired knowledge to solve problems, design solutions, and complete work. 44

45 Quadrant B Verbs apply sequence demonstrate interview construct solve calculate dramatize interpret illustrate Products scrapbook summary interpretation collection annotation explanation solution demonstration outline 45

46 1 Knowledge in one discipline 2 Apply knowledge in discipline A Acquisition Quadrant A: Acquisition International Center for Leadership in Education (n.d.) Students gather and store bits of knowledge/info rmation and are expected to remember or understand this acquired knowledge. Awareness1 Comprehension 2 Application 3 46

47 Quadrant A Verbs name label define select identify list memorize recite locate record Products definition worksheet list quiz test workbook true-false reproduction recitation 47

48 Rigor/Relevance Framework ® Teacher/Student Roles 48 Student ThinkCBA D Student Think & Work Teacher Work Student Work RELEVANCE Low High RIGORRIGOR Low High International Center for Leadership in Education (n.d.)

49 The Gradual Release of Responsibility Structure for Successful Instruction TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson Guided Instruction “I do it” “We do it” “You do it together” Collaborative Independent “You do it alone” Fisher & Frey (2008) Better Learning Through Structured Teaching STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 49

50 The “Sudden” Release of Responsibility TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson “I do it” Independent “You do it alone” STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 50 Fisher & Frey (2008) Better Learning Through Structured Teaching

51 The “Good Enough” Release of Responsibility TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson Guided Instruction “I do it” “We do it” Independent “You do it alone” STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 51 Fisher & Frey (2008) Better Learning Through Structured Teaching

52 A Model for Student Success The Gradual Release of Responsibility TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY Focus Lesson Guided Instruction “I do it” “We do it” “You do it together” Collaborative Independent “You do it alone” STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 52 Fisher & Frey (2008) Better Learning Through Structured Teaching

53 CCSS for Mathematics Provide focus and coherence Organized around mathematical principles Stress conceptual understanding of key ideas as well as skills Prepare students for college and career What are the implications for instruction? 53

54 “…teachers themselves need to understand the standards. Teachers must have deep and appropriate content knowledge to reach that understanding; they must be adaptable, with enough mastery to teach students with a range of abilities; and they must have the ability to inspire at least some of their students to the highest levels of mathematical achievement.” Ewing (n.d.) The Common Core Math Standards “…teachers themselves need to understand the standards. Teachers must have deep and appropriate content knowledge to reach that understanding; they must be adaptable, with enough mastery to teach students with a range of abilities; and they must have the ability to inspire at least some of their students to the highest levels of mathematical achievement.” Ewing (n.d.) The Common Core Math Standards Influence on Student Learning 54

55 Strands of Math Proficiency Adaptive Reasoning Strategic Competence Conceptual Understanding Procedural Fluency Productive Disposition Strands of Math Proficiency Adaptive Reasoning Strategic Competence Conceptual Understanding Procedural Fluency Productive Disposition Standards for Mathematical Practice Seek to Develop in Students NCTM Process Standards Problem Solving Reasoning and Proof Communication Representation Connections 55

56 Standards for Mathematical Practice 56 adapted from McCallum (2011) Standards for Mathematical Practice Overarching habits of mind of a productive mathematical thinker Reasoning and explaining Modeling and using tools Seeing structure and generalizing 1. Make sense of problem and persevere in solving them. 6. Attend to precision. 1. Make sense of problem and persevere in solving them. 6. Attend to precision. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning

57 Create a Frayer Model Poster Essential Characteristics Teaching Methods Examples of What Students Will Be Doing Non-examples of What Students Will Be Doing Standards for Mathematical Practice Work with a table group on one of the Standards for Mathematical Practice. Create a Frayer Model Poster connecting student actions and teacher actions. 57

58 Frayer Model Poster Carousel Display your poster. Examine the poster to the right of your group’s poster. Look for evidence of the “processes and proficiencies.” Rotate to the right and continue until you have finished examining all posters. Be ready to share out any questions or “ahas.” 58

59 Research-Informed Best Practices Access prior knowledge and address students’ misconceptions Provide routines and structures that help struggling learners organize critical content Engage students with challenging tasks that involve active meaning making Use formative assessment and provide timely, specific feedback Provide on-going cumulative distributed practice Promote learners’ beliefs about their own intelligence (growth mindset vs. fixed mindset) adapted from Briars (2011) Intensified Algebra 59 Access prior knowledge and address students’ misconceptions Provide routines and structures that help struggling learners organize critical content Engage students with challenging tasks that involve active meaning making Use formative assessment and provide timely, specific feedback Provide on-going cumulative distributed practice Promote learners’ beliefs about their own intelligence (growth mindset vs. fixed mindset) adapted from Briars (2011) Intensified Algebra

60 Cognitively-Guided Instruction Process Start the study of a new concept with a rich problem or hypothesis Question, justify, and critique thinking Use your understanding of student thinking to guide further instruction Communicate multiple representations of solutions. Invite your students to engage in the problem 60 Gendron (2011) So, What’s New in the Common Core State Standards?

61 Table Pattern Task A catering manager wants to know how many people can sit around the tables he uses for parties. The number of people who can sit around the tables will depend on the shape of the table and the number that are put together. How can the manager determine how many people can sit around any number of tables of any shape? 61

62 Table Pattern Task Find an algebraic rule to describe the relationship between the number of tables, n, and the number of people, p, for tables with any number of sides, s. Explain your thinking. 62

63 Debrief the CGI Process Start the study of a new concept with a rich problem or hypothesis Question, justify, and critique thinking Use your understanding of student thinking to guide further instruction Communicate multiple representations of solutions. Invite your students to engage in the problem Table Pattern Task Asked questions to unpack the problem Asked questions about strategies and relationships Asked questions to check for understanding during and after the task Use results to plan next steps 63 Gendron (2011) So, What’s New in the Common Core State Standards?

64 Table Pattern Task and Standards for Mathematical Practice Standard for Mathematical Practice 3: Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. How did the teacher facilitate the task to support Standard 3? As a student, what did you do to demonstrate proficiency of Standard 3? What other Standards for Mathematical Practice were addressed by this task? 64

65 How might we vary the task for different grade levels? Using the CCSS for Mathematics handout, work with grade-level partners to provide some examples. Modifying the Table Pattern Task 65

66 Students’ Beliefs About Their Intelligence Fixed Mindset – Avoid learning situations if they might make mistakes – Try to hide, rather than fix, mistakes or deficiencies Growth Mindset – Work to correct mistakes and deficiencies – View effort as positive; increase effort when challenged 66 Briars (2011) Implementing the More Challenging Aspects of Common Core State Standards

67 Students Can Develop Growth Mindsets Explicit instruction about the brain, its function, and that intellectual development is the result of effort and learning has increased students’ achievement in middle school mathematics. Teacher praise influences mindsets: – Fixed: Praise refers to intelligence – Growth: Praise refers to effort, engagement, perseverance 67 Briars (2011) Implementing the More Challenging Aspects of Common Core State Standards

68 Expectancy: Can I Do This? Attribute successes to high effort or effective strategy Attribute failures to low effort or ineffective strategy Avoid saying, “You’re smart” Discuss the different views of intelligence Be explicit about what sorts of effort lead to success Design instruction to support successful learning experiences Dweck (2006) Presentation on Intelligence Theory 68

69 Value: Is This Important? 69 “How many of us have used the “it’s on the test” to emphasize the importance of a skill or assignment?”

70 Value: Is This Important? Connect classroom activities to personal short-term goals. Connect classroom activities to personal long-term goals. Place classroom activities in personally meaningful contexts. 70

71 Growth Mindset and Productive Disposition “Just as students must develop a productive disposition toward’s mathematics such that they believe that mathematics makes sense and that they can figure it out, so too must teachers develop a similar productive disposition.” National Research Council (2005) Adding It Up “Just as students must develop a productive disposition towards mathematics such that they believe that mathematics makes sense and that they can figure it out, so too must teachers develop a similar productive disposition.” National Research Council (2001) Adding It Up 71

72 Best Practices for the Common Core Engage students with challenging tasks that involve active meaning making – Quadrant B, C, and D learning opportunities – Cognitively-Guided Instruction with a focus on the Standards for Mathematical Practice – Questioning to facilitate thinking and learning Promote learners’ beliefs about their own intelligence (growth mindset vs. fixed mindset) – Design instruction to support student success – Explicitly reinforce high effort and students’ use of effective strategies – Repackage content using real-world connections, puzzles, and games – Model a productive disposition 72

73 Reflection Think about what you learned today. Decide on one thing you will do differently to start transitioning to the Common Core State Standards. Share your ideas with a partner. 73

74 Effective Instruction “A long line of students has established that the single most important school influence on student learning is the quality of the teacher.” as presented by Linda Darling-Hammond (2007) How would you describe a classroom where effective instruction and learning is taking place? 74

75 Update Supplemental Instructional Materials Recent legislation (SB 140) authorizes the CDE to approve supplemental instructional materials to provide a bridge between the common core academic content standards and the instructional materials currently being used. 75

76 Step 1: Select a Standard Concept1997 StandardCCSS Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes (e.g., 2 triangles to form a rectangle) Grade 2Kindergarten Introduction of fractions as numbersGrade 2Grade 3 Add and subtract simple fractionsGrade 3Grade 4 Introduction of IntegersGrade 4Grade 6 Dividing fractions by fractionsGrade 5Grade 6 adapted from © 2001 California County Superintendents Educational Services Associations, Mathematics General Examples of Grade Level Shifts 76

77 Step 1: Select a Standard Model Concept: Add and Subtract Fractions Domain: Number and Operations – Fractions 4.NF – Standard: 3b. Decompose a fraction into a sum of fractions with the same denominator in more than one way, recording each decomposition by an equation. Justify decompositions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model. Examples: 3/8 = 1/8 + 1/8 + 1/8 3/8 = 1/8 + 2/8 2 1/8 = /8 = 8/8 + 8/8 + 1/8 77

78 Step 2: Align the Standard Model Look for instruction and resources that align to the standard. Determine the resources with which you will start. Analyze the instruction, identify the alignment in the instructional design, rigor, and/or focus of the materials. 78

79 Step 3: Identify Next Steps With your group, identify the next steps necessary to analyze the alignment between the CCSS and current instructional materials. Record the next steps on chart paper. Be prepared to share with the whole group. 79

80 Part 1: Connecting to Standards for Mathematical Practice Instructional Materials With your table group, locate and read the Questions for Planning and Observation handout. Discuss how these questions might support the effective implementation of these practices and what, if any, additional questions you might add. 80

81 Part 2: Connecting to Standards for Mathematical Practice Instructional Materials Follow along as the instructor models the Task Analysis Templates and Samples. With a partner, look through your instructional materials and locate places that could be used to support the effective implementation of the Standards for Mathematical Practice. Consider: – Lesson Sections – Sample Problems/Tasks – Assessment Items – Other Ancillary Materials 81

82 Part 3: Connecting to Standards for Mathematical Practice Instructional Materials Using the Task Analysis Template, “Finding and Enhancing Tasks Already Aligned to CCSS Standards for Mathematical Practice in the Text,” find a specific problem/task that reflects a CCSS mathematical practice. Describe the expected student behaviors. Be prepared to share with the whole group. 82

83 Part 4: Connecting to Standards for Mathematical Practice Instructional Materials With a partner, identify a “routine” problem from a lesson in your instructional materials using the Task/Practice Sample, “Extending a Textbook Problem to Access a Mathematical Practice.” Using the Standards for Mathematical Practice, describe how you might extend the problem to better access a SPECIFIC practice. 83

84 Part 5: Connecting to Standards for Mathematical Practice Instructional Materials Using the same problem, discuss how you would extend it again to access a DIFFERENT Standards for Mathematical Practice. Be ready to share out both problems. 84

85 Reflection How might the information from this activity change the way you utilize instructional materials to effectively incorporate Standards for Mathematical Practice in your instruction? Which problems/tasks will you choose to implement and why? Which Standards for Mathematical Practice are addressed in these tasks? 85

86 Alignment Process Aligning Current Instructional Materials to the Common Core State Standards 1.Select the Standard 2.Align the Standard 3.Identify Next Steps 86

87 Step 1: Select a Standard Start with – Standards that are completely new to a grade – Standards that are significantly different in rigor or complexity Decide on a comprehensive approach – Review one of these standards from each strand OR – Review one whole strand at a time 87

88 Step 2: Aligning the Standard to Your Current Instructional Materials Look for instructional materials and resources in your current adoption that align to the standard. Brainstorm which materials and resources you will start with. “Dig in” to identify alignment or gaps in the instructional design, rigor, and/or focus of the materials. 88

89 Step 3: Identify Next Steps With your group, identify the next steps necessary to analyze the alignment between the CCSS and current instructional materials. Record the next steps on chart paper. Be prepared to share with the whole group. 89

90 Reflect, Discuss, Share Examine standards that will clearly require collaboration. Develop ideas for ways in which teachers will work together across content areas. Consider ways that collaboration can be sustained in planning, teaching, and assessment of student work. Share out main ideas and where to start. 90

91 Connecting to Current Practice Think-Pair-Share How do the new standards correspond to what you already include in your curriculum? Think back to the last informational text passage, writing, or speaking assignment you gave your students. What might you do differently next time to help students transition to the CCSS? 91

92 Next Steps What can be done as an individual teacher, a department, a site, and/or a district to support the transition to teaching the CCSS? Choose a perspective and write down three ideas:

93 For Further Investigation California’s Common Core State Standards Common Core State Standards Initiative Illustrativemathematics.org commoncoretools.me map.mathshell.org ime.math.arizona.edu/progressions 93

94 94 Math Standards Summary (key concepts/skills) of Standard:


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