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The Hobbit Students will make inferences using details from the text. Students will identify and cite examples of internal and external conflict. Students.

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Presentation on theme: "The Hobbit Students will make inferences using details from the text. Students will identify and cite examples of internal and external conflict. Students."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Hobbit Students will make inferences using details from the text. Students will identify and cite examples of internal and external conflict. Students will analyze elements of plot. Students will engage in focused conversation with peers to develop understanding of text. Students will annotate text to connect to the literature and enhance active reading skills.

2 Activities Chapter 13: design an alliteration or tongue twister 13.pdf 13.pdf Chapter 14: design a map of Lake-town 14.pdf 14.pdf

3 Writing Tolkien's goblins and elves seem to embody evil and good. It would appear to be impossible for a goblin to be good or an elf, evil. What do you think of the morals of this concept? Should genetics really have so much power over individual morality?

4 Quiz and note taking Theme on Home The first thing we know about Bilbo (and Elrond and Beorn) is that they have homes. And one of the defining characteristics of Thorin and Gollum is that they do not have permanent homes (or else, they're separated from their places of origin). Having a home seems to give Bilbo a sense of security and moral stability that Thorin, even though he is a decent person, does not have. What's more, as we discuss in "Symbols, Imagery, Allegory," the most important treasures in The Hobbit also seem to represent different ideas of home. Questions About The Home Bilbo's hobbit-hole is only one of many important refuges in The Hobbit. There's also Elrond's Last Homely House in Rivendell, and Beorn's giant home just beyond the Misty Mountains. How do these homes compare to Bilbo's? What do they have in common? Which of the characters in The Hobbit appear to be homeless? How does their loss of home change or harm them? In what ways is the dwarves' quest for treasure also a quest for home? Generally speaking, why might the idea of home be important in a novel about adventure? How do the different homes in the novel contrast with the book's more action-packed passages?

5 Vocabulary Slithered Drear Foiled Quench Gilded Recompense Define each term, write a sentence with a picture, find a non example and example, and score a 100% on the test on Friday

6 grammar Pronoun activities


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