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Robonova-1 Instruction Manual v1.5 Written by Meena Seralathan.

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1 Robonova-1 Instruction Manual v1.5 Written by Meena Seralathan

2 Overview The Robonova-1 is a humanoid robot able to execute a number of pre-programmed moves, as well as execute new moves through use of the RoboBASIC programming language, and the RoboBASIC’s catch-and-play feature, which allows for real-time recording of servo positions for even simpler routine coding. While there are also a program designed for emulating the remote control (roboRemocon) and a program designed to be a version of RoboBASIC that is coded more like a script and less like a program(roboScript), it is generally easier to program in the RoboBASIC program.

3 What the Robonova-1 Comes With 16 servos MR-C3024 controller board 5-cell NiMH rechargeable battery and charger IR sensor on head for use with included remote control 8 AD ports PIEZO speaker for basic sound capabilities CD with RoboBASIC, roboRemocon, and roboScript (all v2.5) for programming the robot’s moves; also comes with code demonstrating various movements the Robonova-1 can do, such as walking, sitting, and punching, and an instruction PDF (in English, Japanese, or Korean)‏

4 What the Robonova-1 Can Be Modified To Have Up to 8 additional servos Touch Sensors Sound Sensors IR Sensors Sonar Sensors Light Sensors Tilt Sensors Accelerometer Gyro Gripper Hands (to replace hands included with robot)‏ Camera Different-colored head/brackets

5 List of Actions Included with the Robonova-1 Standard Pose Sit Bend Raise hands Left/Right/Front punch Tumble forward/backward Cartwheel left/right Turn left/right Step forward/backward/left/right Stand up (useful if the robot falls on its back or its stomach)‏ Left/Right kick Left/Right hand attack Fast walk “Fly” Handstand Dance

6 How to program the Robonova-1 The Robonova-1 does not come with a board that is easily programmable in any language other than its provided language, RoboBASIC. The firmware on the robot is specially designed to work with this language (not even normal BASIC), and programming in another language would essentially require wiping the board and creating one's own code for the board to read in the language of choice. Thus there are mainly two methods of programming the robot: Using the included interfaces and language Using another board with better language compatibility as a master board, and then using this board to send signals to the robot’s board First, this manual will deal with RoboBASIC and how to use it to program simple and not-so-simple routines. Then it will provide a general method of controlling the Robonova-1 with another board. NOTE: This manual assumes you have a 3000-series board,. Though the parameters and general concepts provided in this manual will work with the 2000-series, some of the functions have different names (especially in the sound and serial communications categories). If working with the 2000-series, refer to the.pdf file provided with your hardware to make sure you are using the right names for your commands. NOTE: This program was meant to be used under Windows, and is designed to work with Windows 98, ME, 2000, or XP. Using this with Vista will give you errors, and the program cannot be (easily) installed on Mac or Linux systems. If working under Vista, go to the Appendix to find out a fix to the incompatibility issue.

7 Initializing Your Robonova-1 In order to start your first program, you need to first make sure your robot is properly connected to your computer. Make sure you follow this procedure before attempting to program the Robonova-1. You should not have to do this again, unless you reinstall the software. (1) Connect the provided serial cable to the robot and to the correct port on your computer. Turn the robot on. (2) Open RoboBASICv2.5. Go to Set -> Controller Type. Make sure the selected controller is the right one for your robot. (3) Go to Set ->Set Port. Make sure Com Port (Serial Type) is selected in the Port box. (4) Find out what COM port the serial cable is connected to. If you do not know how to do this, refer to the Appendix at the end of this manual. (5) Select the correct COM port in the drop-down box next to Port No. You can leave the rest of the information alone for now. (6) Now go to Controller -> Controller Information. Make sure your robot is connected and on; if it is not, you will probably receive an error code of -4 (-4 generally means the robot is not connected to the computer). You should see a window that displays a variety of information. If you get a window with no information, this means your computer is not properly connected to the robot. Check the cable again, and make sure the robot is on and running. (7) If all went well and you saw information in the text windows, then you’re set!

8 Using RoboBASIC v2.5

9 A Snapshot of RoboBASIC v2.5

10 Overview of RoboBASIC RoboBASIC is the only program of the three where users code in a traditional-looking environment. RoboBASIC is also the main program to use with the Robonova-1’s catch- and-play features.

11 Using RoboBASIC The buttons in the toolbar that you will use most are the Download and the Run All buttons. These are the second and third encircled buttons, respectively. Download will send the code to the robot, while Run All will execute it once on the robot. Both options will automatically compile the code before sending it to the robot. If you prefer, you can also compile the code separately using the Make Object Code button (first encircled button).

12 More on Using RoboBASIC These three buttons are shortcuts to the text menu choices. Starting from the left, they are: Controller Information (which you should already know something about) Servo Motor Real-Time Control (used for the catch-and-play feature, and discussed later in this manual) Direct Line Control (used to execute a single line of code; only for OUT, MOVE, SERVO, POS, MOVEPOS commands).

13 Even More on Using RoboBASIC These are more shortcuts, dealing more specifically with the robot controller. Starting from the left, they are: Clear Memory (this should clear any old programs off the robot’s memory; useful for when the robot starts accidentally running old code) Controller Reset Mode (should reset the board back to its factory defaults; may require re-initializing board, and should clear everything done to the board after receiving it) Controller Run Mode (have not actually used this command) Controller Stop Mode (this one either) ROBONOVA (or this one)

14 A Glimpse of RoboBASIC Writing Code for a Single Action

15 On the right is an example of what roboBASIC code looks like. This code tells the robot to move to its standard position. Before giving a more detailed explanation of how to program using this language, we will explain what this code block does. GETMOTORSET G24, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0 SPEED 5 MOTOR G24 MOVE G6A,100, 76, 145, 93, 100, 100 MOVE G6D,100, 76, 145, 93, 100, 100 MOVE G6B,100, 30, 80, 100, 100, 100 MOVE G6C,100, 30, 80, 100, 100, 100 WAIT

16 Writing Code for a Single Action This command is used to read the position of a set of servos, and to then set the servo positions. In this line, GETMOTORSET reads the positions of all servos ( G24 refers to all servos under the control of the board), and then sets each to the values listed after G24. A “1” tells the Robonova-1 to keep the position of the servo as-is, while a “0” tells the Robonova-1 to change the servo to its initial position. It is best to put this at the beginning of all programs, because it sets the servos to positions that will ensure that it starts moving safely. GETMOTORSET G24, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0

17 Writing Code for a Single Action This command is rather straightforward; it sets the speed of the servo movement. The higher the value after SPEED, the faster the robot will move. Values can range between 1 and 20, but it is best to keep most movements at 10 or lower for stability (any value higher than 15 is likely to cause problems with an unmodded robot). For very fast movements there is a HIGHSPEED command, which will be touched on later. SPEED 5

18 Writing Code for a Single Action This command turns on the output port of the specified servo set (in this case, all of them). In other words, it opens the servo ports so that your code can talk to the servos and tell them to move. If planning on having all body parts of the robot move during your routine, this is a must-have piece of code at the beginning of the file. MOTOR G24

19 Writing Code for a Single Action These lines are what actually move the Robonova-1. The command MOVE is followed by the set of servos you want to move (more info about what G6A, etc mean on the next slide). 100 is the initial value for servo positions; values above 100 move the servos clockwise, while values below 100 move the servos anti- clockwise. MOVE G6A,100, 76, 145, 93, 100, 100 MOVE G6D,100, 76, 145, 93, 100, 100 MOVE G6B,100, 30, 80, 100, 100, 100 MOVE G6C,100, 30, 80, 100, 100, 100

20 Writing Code for a Single Action Besides the group G24, there are 4 subsets of servos that one can concentrate on. Each set can control six servos at a time. A: Servos 0-5 B: Servos 6-11 C: Servos D: Servos 18-23

21 Writing Code for a Single Action To the right is a diagram to show what servo corresponds to what number in the motor group. As you can see: Group A mostly controls the left leg Group B mostly controls the left arm Group C mostly controls the right arm Group D mostly controls the right leg

22 Writing Code for a Single Action Last but not least is the WAIT command. This command tells the servos to wait until every specified motor set has finished moving before going onto whatever code comes after the movement. This is particularly useful if you plan on having multiple movements in one routine. WAIT

23 A Glimpse of RoboBASIC Using Multiple Commands in a Single Program

24 There are ways to program the Robonova-1 to execute multiple movements in succession, as well as ways to program it to loop through commands, or to read input from the remote control and act accordingly. Each will be described briefly.

25 Programming a Chain of Movements This program will cause the robot to move to its standard pose, take a bow, then return to its standard pose. Putting a quotation mark before a line is how one comments out a line of code. As you can see, having one move succeed another is as easy as putting the new servo values after the previous move. GETMOTORSET G24, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0 SPEED 5 MOTOR G24 ‘standard pose MOVE G6A,100, 76, 145, 93, 100, 100 MOVE G6D,100, 76, 145, 93, 100, 100 MOVE G6B,100, 30, 80, 100, 100, 100 MOVE G6C,100, 30, 80, 100, 100, 100 WAIT ‘bend SPEED 8 MOVE G6A, 100, 58, 135, 160, 100, 100 MOVE G6D, 100, 58, 135, 160, 100, 100 MOVE G6B, 100, 30, 80,,,, MOVE G6C, 100, 30, 80,,,, WAIT ‘standard pose MOVE G6A,100, 76, 145, 93, 100, 100 MOVE G6D,100, 76, 145, 93, 100, 100 MOVE G6B,100, 30, 80, 100, 100, 100 MOVE G6C,100, 30, 80, 100, 100, 100 WAIT

26 Using For Loops, If Statements For loops and if statements are included in RoboBASIC and are similar to their BASIC parallels. For the interval in the for loop one has to take a predefined variable (in this case, I ), set it to an initial value ( 0 ), and choose a value to increase the initial value to ( 10 ). The end of the for loop is signified by the NEXT command. For the if statement, one chooses a predefined variable with a value ( X ), determines the condition of the statement ( X < 10 ), then gives a command for the program should that condition be fulfilled. If statements are then ended by the ENDIF command. This is a good time to also point out how to declare variables in RoboBASIC. The syntax is basically, DIM (variable letter) AS (variable type; only bytes and integers are supported). Assigning variables is rather similar to most other languages: variable name = value. DIM I AS INTEGER DIM X AS INTEGER X = 2 FOR I = 0 TO 10 IF X < 10 THEN ‘bend SPEED 8 MOVE G6A, 100, 58, 135, 160, 100, 100 MOVE G6D, 100, 58, 135, 160, 100, 100 MOVE G6B, 100, 30, 80,,,, MOVE G6C, 100, 30, 80,,,, WAIT ‘standard pose MOVE G6A,100, 76, 145, 93, 100, 100 MOVE G6D,100, 76, 145, 93, 100, 100 MOVE G6B,100, 30, 80, 100, 100, 100 MOVE G6C,100, 30, 80, 100, 100, 100 WAIT ENDIF X = X + 4 NEXT

27 Reading from the Remote Control RoboBASIC already has commands to read in values for sensors, and has a command that specifically reads the input sent from the remote to the robot. In this code we are trying to have the robot bow if the user presses 1 on the remote control pad. A is a predefined variable that stores the value coming from the first instance of REMOCON (in other words, the first controller to send data to it). If A isn’t 1 ( A <> 1 ), then the code restarts at the beginning of MAIN ( GOTO MAIN ); otherwise, it goes to another function that defines the bow position, delays the robot’s movement for a second ( DELAY 1000 ), then moves the robot to its standard position and loops back to the beginning of MAIN. MAIN: A = REMOCON(1) IF A <> 1 THEN GOTO MAIN SPEED 8 GOSUB bow_pose DELAY 1000 SPEED 6 GOSUB standard_pose GOTO MAIN

28 Reading from Serial Device This bit of code will read and store a byte sent over a serial connection with a baud rate of 57600, and will loop back to the beginning of read_bluetooth until it gets a byte. When it does get a byte, it stores it in X and then returns to the part of the code that called the function. ERX (baud rate), (predefined byte variable), (location in code to go to if byte is not read)‏ read_bluetooth: ERX 57600, X, read_bluetooth RETURN

29 Things to Note When Reading From a Bluetooth Device ETX/ERX can only send and receive byte values. Make sure the variables for these are initiated accordingly. The Robonova-1 works with TTL, not RS-232. Be sure to use a device that is TTL-compatible, else find a converter for the devices.

30 Using the Catch-and-Play Features Via RoboBasic v2.5

31 Catch-and-Play You can pull up this screen by going to the menu and clicking Control -> Servo Motor Real-Time Control. To use the catch-and-play feature, you first unselect all of the servos that you want to move. This is about the equivalent of MOTOR. After that, you move the robot into the position you want, then make sure that all boxes are checked again. This is the equivalent of GETMOTORSET. Finally, to add the new position to your code, press the Move Insert button of each motor group. Don’t forget to add a WAIT command at the end! You can also use this window to learn more about servo position values, in case you’re interested in correctly coding these values without having to use the catch- and-play interface.

32 A Deeper Glimpse at RoboBASIC Quick Index of RoboBASIC Commands

33 General Program Commands GOTO [function] GOSUB [function] RETURN END STOP RUN WAIT DELAY [time] BREAK Jumps to a specified part of program and executes all code henceforth Jumps to specified part of program and executes code until a RETURN is reached Returns from a subroutine to the point where the subroutine was called End the program Stop the program Run the program continuously Wait until the program has finished before moving on Delay the execution of the next line of code (value in milliseconds)‏ Pause the program and switch to debug mode

34 Commands Related to Variables DIM [variable] AS [type] CONST INTEGER BYTE Declare a variable as a type Declare a constant variable Used with DIM...AS to declare an integer variable Used with DIM...AS to declare a byte variable

35 For Loops/If Statements IF...THEN ELSEIF...THEN ELSE ENDIF FOR...TO NEXT Start a conditional statement Start a secondary conditional statement Set a default statement for when no conditions have been met End a set of conditional statements Start a for loop End a for loop or iterate variable to next value

36 Supported Logical Expressions AND OR XOR NOT < > <= >= = <>

37 Digital Signal Commands IN [port#] OUT [port#], [outputValue] BYTEIN [port#] BYTEOUT [port#], [outputValue] INKEY [port#] STATE [port#] PULSE [port#] TOGGLE [port#] KEYIN [ADPort], [#keys] Read signal from input port Send signal to output port Read a byte from input port Send a byte to the output port Reduce chattering Get status of output port Send pulse signal to output port Reverse status of output port Receive input from analog keyboard

38 Memory Commands PEEK [region] POKE [region], [byteData] ROMPEEK [region] ROMPOKE [region], [byteData] Read data from controller RAM Write data to controller RAM Read data from external EEPROM RAM Write data to external EEPROM RAM

39 LCD Screen Commands LCDINIT CLS LOCATE [x],[y] PRINT [charString], [ASCIInumber] FORMAT [var], [type], [position] CSON CSOFF CONT DEC HEX BIN Initialize LCD module Clear all characters displayed on LCD Set x/y coordinates of the characters displayed in the LCD Display letter in LCD Set type format of characters on LCD Turn cursor in LCD on Turn cursor in LCD off Set letter contrast Send decimal character to LCD (used with FORMAT )‏ Send hexadecimal character to LCD (used with FORMAT )‏ Send binary character to LCD (used with FORMAT )‏

40 Motor/Servo Commands ZERO [motor0_neutral]... [motorN_neutral] MOTOR [motor#] MOTOROFF [motor#] MOVE [motor0_angle]...[motor N_angle] SPEED DIR PTP SERVO Set neutral angle of servo Turn on the output port of the servo Turn off the output port of the servo Move a set of servos to specified positions Set the speed of the servos (1- 15; 3 is initial)‏ Set the direction of the servos Turn simultaneous control of servos on/off Control a particular servo

41 Even More Motor/Servo Commands PWM FPWM HIGHSPEED FASTSERVO POS MOVEPOS MOVE24 MOTORIN GETMOTORSET INIT Set pulse width control for DC motor Set pulse width and frequency Allow/disable servos to move in “fast mode” Operate servos at maximum speed Set a position for the robot Move to specified POS Move all 24 servos at the same time Read in the motor values for the current position Get the current servo values and determine whether to keep them or set them to their initial positions (1 = keep, 0 = initialize)‏ Set initial pose

42 Last Batch of Motor/Servo Commands AIMOTOR AIMOTOROFF AIMOTORIN SETON SETOFF ALLON ALLOFF Control motors via an AI motor Turn off AI motor Read position values from AI motor Use in conjunction with other commands to enter setup mode Cancel setup mode Use in conjunction with other commands to enter setup mode for all servos Cancel setup mode for all servos

43 Assigning Motor Group Commands G6A G6B G6C G6D G6E G8A G8B G8C G8D G12 G16 G24 G32 Assign servos 0-5 to group A Assign servos 6-11 to group B Assign servos to group C Assign servos to group D (not available for original robot)‏ Assign servos to group E (not available for original robot)‏ Assign servos 0-7 to group A Assign servos 8-15 to group B Assign servos to group C Assign servos to group D (not available for original robot)‏ Assign servos 0-11 Assign servos 0-15 Assign servos 0-23 Assign servos 0-31 (not available for original robot)‏

44 Sound Commands SOUND [pitch],[length] MUSIC [stringOfNotes] TEMPO [value] Plays a note based on inputted frequency/duration Plays a string of notes based on inputted note information Sets the tempo of the song/sound

45 MUSIC Command (More Detail)‏ Scale starts at, C ( CDEFGAB )‏ # = sharp note $ = flat note, P = rest > = raise an octave < = lower an octave L = Low Octave M = Middle Octave H = High Octave T = change tempo 1 = whole note 2 = half note 3 = dotted half note 4 = quarter note 5 = dotted quarter note 8 = 8 th note 9 = dotted 8 th note 6 = 16 th note 7 = dotted 16 th note 0 = 32 nd note

46 MUSIC Command (Even More Detail)‏ Extra notation is placed before the actual note Song is written as a string of notes MUSIC “M4GGAA GGE GGEED” MUSIC “DE#FGAB>#CD”

47 External Communication Commands ERX [baudRate],[byteVar],[Err orProcessFunction] ETX [baudRate], [byteVar] AD( )‏ REMOCON(1)‏ SONAR( )‏ RCIN( )‏ GYRODIR [group],[motorDirection] GYROSET [group],[gyroPort] GYROSENSE [group],[byteSensitivityV alue] Reads a byte from a RS-232 connection through the RX port (goes to ErrorProcessFunction if byte is either not received or is invalid)‏ Sends a byte through the TX port using the RS-232 connection Reads analog signal from device connected to specified AD port Reads signal from remote control/virtual REMOCON Reads distance being measured by the ultrasonic wave port (lower controller port = output ultrasound port, higher controller port = input ultrasound port)‏ Reads signal from RC remote control Sets direction of motor group when they are connected to a specified gyro Assigns gyro to particular set of servos Sets sensitivity of servo group to the gyro

48 Ultrasound Port Information Digital In/Out Controller Port # Ultrasound Port # Port #0 #0 Ultra-sonic Port output Port #1 #0 Ultra-sonic Port input Port #2 #1 Ultra-sonic Port output Port #3 #1 Ultra-sonic Port input Port #4 #2 Ultra-sonic Port output Port #5 #2 Ultra-sonic Port input Port #6 #3 Ultra-sonic Port output Port #7 #3 Ultra-sonic Port input Port #8 #4 Ultra-sonic Port output Port #9 #4 Ultra-sonic Port input Port #10 #5 Ultra-sonic Port output Port #11 #5 Ultra-sonic Port input Port #12 #6 Ultra-sonic Port output Port #13 #6 Ultra-sonic Port input Port #14 #7 Ultra-sonic Port output Port #15 #7 Ultra-sonic Port input Port #16 #8 Ultra-sonic Port output Port #17 #8 Ultra-sonic Port input Port #18 #9 Ultra-sonic Port output Port #19 #9 Ultra-sonic Port input Port #20 #10 Ultra-sonic Port output Port #21 #10 Ultra-sonic Port input Port #22 #11 Ultra-sonic Port output Port #23 #11 Ultra-sonic Port input

49 Gyro Port Information AD Port # Gyro Port # Port #0 (Port #32) Gyro #1 channel output Port Port #1 (Port #33) Gyro #2 channel output Port Port #2 (Port #34) Gyro #3 channel output Port Port #3 (Port #35) Gyro #4 channel output Port Port #4 (Port #36) Gyro #1 channel input Port Port #5 (Port #37) Gyro #2 channel input Port Port #6 (Port #38) Gyro #3 channel input Port Port #7 (Port #39) Gyro #4 channel input Port

50 Baud Rates Supported All with 8-bit data, no parity, 1 stop bit

51 Random Commands RND REMARK [Description] ON [variable] GOTO [function] $DEVICE [Controller] $LIMIT [Motor#],[MinValue],[Ma xValue] Get a random byte number Another way of commenting code Go to a specified section of the code when a variable is of a certain value (simpler version of long if/elseif block)‏ Set controller that will run the program once compiled Set a servos' maximum rotation angle (default )‏

52 Using RoboScript v2.5

53 Snapshot of RoboScript Interface

54 Overview of RoboScript v2.5 RoboScript is very similar to RoboBASIC, with the exception being that code is displayed in a script format, rather than a normal code format. This is can be useful for people who want a simpler way of organizing and reading the roboBASIC code.

55 Initialize the Robonova-1 As with RoboBASIC, your work will go much more smoothly if you make sure your robot is properly connected and is corrctly recognized by the software. Use the same initialization procedure outlined for RoboBASIC; the only difference is that under Port Settings, there will not be a Port section on the left of the window.

56 More on Using RoboScript This program relies almost exclusively on catch-and-play movement code, with only a couple of commands provided ( PTP ALLON, PTP ALLOFF, DELAY, GOTO, and MOVE24 ). To use RoboScript, you turn the robot on, move the dials located at the bottom of the screen until the robot has moved to a desirable position, then use the Insert Move button to place that movement in the code. You can also press the buttons for the other commands and change the parameters in the text boxes/drop- down menus in order to change the speed, insert delays, go to specific lines of code, and. The dials all correspond to specific servos (look back at the Catch-And-Play section to get an idea of which dial will affect what body part). In addition, each dial starts at the Robonova’s initial position. If you read the RoboBASIC section, you know that values above 100 turn the servos clockwise, and values below turn the servos anti- clockwise. Be very careful about using these dials; this method of getting positions makes it much easier to spin a servo too far in a particular position. Make sure you are watching your robot carefully as you make adjustments, to ensure that you do not blow out a servo trying to move it too far into a dangerous position.

57 Using RoboRemocon v2.5

58 Snapshot of RoboRemocon v2.5

59 Overview of RoboRemocon v2.5 This program is not meant for programming the robot; rather, it is meant to set the actions that will be carried out when specific buttons are pressed on the included remote control. It is also meant to serve as a virtual remote control, where the user presses the buttons on the image on-screen rather than the actual remote control in order to carry out the same action (this option being useful if one runs out of batteries or simply loses the remote).

60 Initializing the Robot As with the other two programs, it is useful to make sure the program is talking correctly to the robot. For RoboRemocon, simply make sure the port settings are correct under Setting Port, and you should be fine.

61 Using RoboRemocon To assign actions to the remote, you need to have created the files describing the action in RoboScript (or have made a valid.rsf file). Press the Setting Buttons button. A window like the one in the image should appear. To set the buttons, double-click on the File column in the row of the button you are setting. You will see a screen with text boxes for a label, an.rsf file name (with buttons to clear this box and to browse for the file), and a tag description. Get the RoboScript action you want set to this button, and change the label or tag information if desired. Click Download to send this information to the robot. You should now be able to press buttons on the PC image of the remote and have the robot carry out the actions. To switch control to the IR remote, select the IR Remote Control option in the bottom-left corner of the Setting Buttons screen, then re-download the program. You should then be able to press buttons on the IR remote and have your robot act accordingly. You can also use these settings in a RoboBASIC command by downloading this information and then using the REMOCON command in your RoboBASIC code.

62 Using Another Board to Program With the Robonova-1

63 General Procedure To use another board, you will of course need some sort of way to connect the new board to the Robonova-1’s board. You will also need to find a way to have the computer talk to the new board, plus a method of sending byte signals from the new board to the Robonova-1 board. Then you will need a program on the Robonova-1’s board that can process that byte and carry out an action based on what it received.

64 Sample Code for The Robonova-1 Program ‘Put initialization code here MAIN: GOSUB READ_BOARD IF X = 65 THEN GOSUB STANDARD_POSE 'A ELSEIF X = 66 THEN GOSUB BEND 'B ELSEIF X = 67 THEN GOSUB SIT 'C ELSEIF X = 68 THEN GOSUB STEP_FORWARD 'D ELSEIF X = 69 THEN GOSUB STEP_BACKWARD 'E ELSE MUSIC “CC” ENDIF GOSUB STANDARD_POSE GOSUB MAINB READ_BOARD: ERX 57600, X, READ_BOARD RETURN ‘Put movement code functions here

65 Appendix Trouble-Shooting and Other Random But Important Information

66 Getting RoboBASIC to Work in Vista regsvr32 /u c:\windows\system32\mscomm32.ocx regsvr32 /u c:\windows\system32\COMCT332.ocx regsvr32 /u c:\windows\system32\MSCOMCTL.ocx regsvr32 /u c:\windows\system32\MSCOMCTL.ocx regsvr32 c:\windows\system32\mscomm32.ocx regsvr32 c:\windows\system32\COMCT332.ocx regsvr32 c:\windows\system32\MSCOMCTL.ocx regsvr32 c:\windows\system32\MSCOMCTL.ocx regsvr32 /u c:\windows\system32\COMDLG32.ocx regsvr32 c:\windows\system32\COMDLG32.ocx * For more information on this, visit the RoboSavvy Forums.RoboSavvy Forums To get RoboBASIC working on a Vista machine, paste the following into Notepad, then save as a.bat file. You should then be able to double-click it, and your RoboBASIC program should work.

67 Finding Out What COM Port You Need XP and below: Control Panel (under Start -> Settings) System Hardware Device Manager Ports Communications Port Next to this choice should be the number of the COM port being used by the serial cable. Vista: Control Panel (under Start) System And Maintenance View Hardware and Devices (under Device Manager) Ports Communications Port Next to this choice should be the number of the COM port being used by the serial cable Note: If you could not plug the serial cable into your computer, then you do not have the correct physical COM Port, and will not be able to get the port using these paths. You will have to use a computer that you can plug the cable into before either of these paths will work.

68 Acknowledgements/Sources The RoboSavvy forums and the RoboSavvy wiki page were very helpful for figuring out hardware information, such as modifications that could be used with the robot, and for determining what sort of procedure one would have to go through to use bluetooth with the Robonova-1, or to program it directly using a language other than RoboBASIC. It also provided the solution for getting RoboBASIC and Vista to work with each other.RoboSavvy forums RoboSavvy wiki page The included instruction manual: while it did not explain how to use some features in its programs and was often difficult to understand, it did provide a comprehensive list of commands that can be used in RoboBASIC, as well as instructions on how to initialize the robot.

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