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ASHLEY OWENS ED 350 CARS FALL 2013 STRATEGIC INSTRUCTION IN LITERACY (SIL) Science, Grade 4 Topic: The Three States of Matter.

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Presentation on theme: "ASHLEY OWENS ED 350 CARS FALL 2013 STRATEGIC INSTRUCTION IN LITERACY (SIL) Science, Grade 4 Topic: The Three States of Matter."— Presentation transcript:

1 ASHLEY OWENS ED 350 CARS FALL 2013 STRATEGIC INSTRUCTION IN LITERACY (SIL) Science, Grade 4 Topic: The Three States of Matter

2 E XPOSITORY T EXT : The Three States of Matter is found and adapted from the following website: tml

3 1. S TANDARDS A. IA Core Science: Physical Science: grades 3-5: Understand and apply knowledge of states of matter and changes in states of matter. -Materials can exist in different states – solid, liquid, and gas. Some common materials can be changed from one state to another by heating or cooling.

4 1. S TANDARDS B. IA Core Reading: Literacy: K-12: Reading Informational Texts: Grade 4: RI.4.1. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

5 1. S TANDARDS C. IA Core Writing: W.4.9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. -Apply grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., “Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text”).

6 2. T EXT A. Sample Selection The Three States of Matter Liquid water is found in many places. You see liquid water coming out of the faucet, when it rains, and running in a river. Pure liquid water is free of salt, rocks, soil, and garbage. Ice, snow, and frost are examples of water in the solid state. Liquid water freezes at 0 degrees Celsius. Celsius is a scale that measures temperature. What instrument do you use to measure temperature? Winter is a season that you see a lot of solid water. Other examples of solid water are ice cubes, icicles, and ice on a skating rink. Adapted from

7 2. T EXT B. Grade-level readability statistic: FK 4.7 C. Cues analysis 1. Semantics = the text includes general vocabulary known to fourth grade science students except for a few content specific words: Celsius, gaseous, evaporate, condensation, molecules, water vapor, physical and chemical properties. The meanings of the words in this text are very literal, not beyond the words’ denotations.  Strategy = matching for the development of vocabulary words, allowing the students to make connections with and define the words.

8 2. T EXT C. Cue analysis 2. Syntax = the sentences in this text are mostly simple sentences with a few compound and complex sentences. The text also uses declarative sentences and interrogative sentences that allow the students to make connections between the text and their own lives: What instrument do you use to measure temperature?

9 2. T EXT C. Cue analysis 2. Syntax = Also, the use of adjectives and adverbs is limited in this text. For example, there are many sentences that are very similar to the following: Ice, snow, and frost are examples of water in the solid state. This allows the readers to follow the text better because this content is best understood with the use of examples.

10 2. T EXT C. Cues analysis 3. Text structure = this text has an expository text structure. It is organized in a logical manner, starting with liquids, then solids, then gases. This text describes the three states of matter, leaving the comparing and contrasting of the three stages of matter to the students.  Strategy = Venn diagram for comparing and contrasting the three states of matter.

11 2. TEXT C. Cues analysis 4. Graphics = the print legibility of this text is a 14-size font. It is easy for students to read. The title represents what the text is about. There are iconic representations/pictures that help depict the content of the reading. For example, there is a picture of a running faucet to show an example of water in the liquid state. There is also a picture of a snowman to show an example of water in the solid state, and a picture of gas (a blank box) represents that some gas is invisible.  Strategy = process drama for acting out the movement of particles in the three states of matter.

12 2. TEXT C. Cues analysis 5. Reader prior knowledge = for students to be able to fully understand and acquire new information from this lesson on the three states of matter, students will have to have prior knowledge about matter, molecules, atoms, and physical and chemical changes/properties. A lesson on the three states of matter would come after a lesson involving the previously mentioned terms. D. This analysis supports the FK of 4.7, and a grade-level readability range is appropriate = 4- 5.

13 3. D IFFERENTIATION A. New found texts For struggling readers = FK 2.8 The Three States of Matter The wood block is solid. A solid has a certain size and shape. The wood block does not change size or shape. Other examples of solids are the computer, the desk, and the floor. You can change the shape of solids. You change the shape of sheets of lumber by sawing it in half or burning it. How might you change the shape of a piece of gum? Adapted from

14 3. D IFFERENTIATION For readers needing challenge FK = 6.8 The Three States of Matter Solids are all around us. Your desk is a solid, and so is the chair you are sitting in. Solids are different from other states of matter in that solids are able to hold their shape. In a solid the particles are pressed very tightly together. This helps the solid keep its shape.  The graphics in this text are more complex than the previous two texts, depicting molecule configurations. The vocabulary in this text is more advanced, including words such as definite volume, particles, and energy, which makes this text more challenging. Adapted from https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&cad=rja&ved=0CEMQFjAD&url=http%3 A%2F%2Fwww.washoecountyschools.net%2Fwashoesip%2Fuserfiles%2Ffile%2FELA%2F5th%2520Grade%2FSci ence%2F5th%2520IT%2520States%2520of%2520Matter% doc&ei=gChkUtuiD8er2gWWo4DoDw&usg=AF QjCNGL4iJor9wmnXUNJ1IstFn9IP9xOw&sig2=gXZ8xwZwbeeFc6pCFImnaw

15 3. D IFFERENTIATION B. Strategy = the vocabulary words used in the matching activity will be based on the students’ readings. During the Venn diagram activity, some characteristics can already be written in the circles, characteristics may be written on strips of paper (including odd-ball characteristics) and students will sort them into their appropriate categories/circles, or a blank Venn diagram may be provided.

16 T HE INSTRUCTION BEGINS Motivation I am going to show you a video that talks about the three states of matter. I want you to listen and watch carefully, so you can all tell me one thing you learned or observed! cience/matter/solids-liquids-gases.htm Model: One thing I learned was that if something is a solid it can become a liquid or even a gas! Objects can change between the three states of matter!

17 5. P RIOR K NOWLEDGE A. Tap: If I asked you all what everything in the world was made up of, what would you tell me? B. Predict/correct errors: Matter! Everything in our world is made of matter. Did you know that particles make up matter? Because particles move at different speeds, we have solids, liquids, and gases.

18 5. P RIOR KNOWLEDGE C. Build CA knowledge base: We will be reading a short text that explains the three states of matter and what the particles are doing in each state: solid, liquid, and gas. We will be comparing and contrasting the different characteristics in each of the three states of matter. First, we are going to learn some new vocabulary terms that will help us to better understand our readings for today.

19 6. VOCABULARY Some words in this text are new to us. Words such as Celsius, evaporate, water vapor, and condensation. We can use the matching strategy to learn these words. This matching exercise will help set the stage for your group’s future reading.

20 6. VOCABULARY : M ATCHING S TRATEGY Strategy name: matching Description : a teaching strategy that involves pairing vocabulary terms with their appropriate definitions. Purpose : used before, during, or after reading to expand vocabulary or content knowledge. Steps : 1. Read a vocabulary term 2. Read all possible matching definitions 3. Determine the best “match” 4. Check answer by flipping the vocabulary term/word over (the correct definition will be located here)

21 6. VOCABULARY : MATCHING MODEL Model: I am going to first read the vocabulary term, matter. Then, I am going to read all possible definitions that could define my vocabulary term. One definition says “anything that takes up space and has particles.” The other definitions says “the smallest possible amount of a particular substance.” I am going to now determine which definition best defines matter. I am going to choose “anything that takes up space and has particles.” When I have completed all the vocabulary terms, I can flip my cards over to check my answers.

22 6. VOCABULARY : MATCHING PRACTICE Guided practice: I am going to split you into three groups. Each group is going to receive different vocabulary terms based on their future readings. I want you to work together as a group to determine the matching definitions for each vocabulary term. *Teacher will walk around guiding the practice of this strategy in all three of the different leveled groups.

23 7. P URPOSE Our purpose of our lesson today is to become informed (reading purpose) about the three states of matter and their particles (content). First, I will walk you through (walk through) the sections of the text. Then, you will predict the topic or purpose of each section (challenge). I will help you find the similarities and differences (expository text structure) within each of the different texts using a Venn diagram. Finally you will act out the particle movements in each of the three states of matter (strategy).

24 7. P URPOSE Walkthrough & predictions by paragraph: 1: What do you predict the first paragraph is going to talk about? What characteristics might this paragraph describe? 2: What do you predict the second paragraph is going to talk about? What examples might it mention? 3: What might the third paragraph talk about based on what we have already predicted in the first two paragraphs? *A walkthrough will be done with all three texts

25 7. P URPOSE The Three States of Matter Liquid water is found in many places. You see liquid water coming out of the faucet, when it rains, and running in a river. Pure liquid water is free of salt, rocks, soil, and garbage. Ice, snow, and frost are examples of water in the solid state. Liquid water freezes at 0 degrees Celsius. Celsius is a scale that measures temperature. What instrument do you use to measure temperature? Winter is a season that you see a lot of solid water. Other examples of solid water are ice cubes, icicles, and ice on a skating rink.

26 8. C OMPREHENSION MONITORING

27 I have been modeling, and you all have been practicing many steps from our comprehension monitoring strategy. Today, I am going to model and you are going to practice one of the fix-up steps because it will help you better understand our expository text. The hand icon points to a sentence. If the reading stops making sense, we are going to “note the sentence clues” – the context clues, examples, punctuation, and/or pictures, we see to help us better understand the text. We might have to reread or read ahead to find the clues!

28 8. C OMPREHENSION MONITORING Model: I read, “ Liquid water freezes at 0 degrees Celsius.” I stop and ask myself, does this make sense? I do not know what Celsius is. I am going to reread the sentence and read ahead to see if I can find any context clues. I read, “Celsius is a scale that measures temperature.” I found a context clue! When I read ahead it gave me a definition of the word Celsius. Can you find any other words that might have helped me figure out what the word Celsius meant? “...freezes at 0 degrees...”

29 9. S ILENT R EADING As you read 1. Ask yourself, “does this make sense?” 2. If not, stop and reread the sentence or read ahead to find context clues/details that will help you make sense of the text. 3. Solve problems as you read using our comprehension monitoring checklist, remembering the similarities and differences between the states of matter.

30 9. S ILENT R EADING The Three States of Matter Liquid water is found in many places. You see liquid water coming out of the faucet, when it rains, and running in a river. Pure liquid water is free of salt, rocks, soil, and garbage. Ice, snow, and frost are examples of water in the solid state. Liquid water freezes at 0 degrees Celsius. Celsius is a scale that measures temperature. What instrument do you use to measure temperature? Winter is a season that you see a lot of solid water. Other examples of solid water are ice cubes, icicles, and ice on a skating rink.

31 10. Q UESTIONING OR Q UESTION - ANSWER R ELATIONSHIP OR QAR (R APHAEL, 1982) With each question/answer, we will look back and reread to find the paragraph where the answer is found! 1. What are the three states of matter? (Solids, liquids, & gases) o Right there if found at the beginning of paragraph one, two, and three 2. What are examples of liquids? (faucet water, river water, and rain water) o Right there if found in the first paragraph 3. What are examples of solids? (ice, snow, frost, ice cubes, icicles, and ice on a skating rink) o Right there if found in the second paragraph 4. In which state do the particles move the fastest? (Gas) o Think and search if found by reading and looking at the pictures

32 10. Q UESTIONING 5. What causes the particles to move in matter? (Adding or subtracting heat) o Author and you if found in the fourth paragraph and use of prior knowledge 5. Can one object go through the three states of matter? (Yes. Water can be a solid (ice), a liquid (water), and a gas (water vapor). o Think and search if you read the text and put the information together from each paragraph 7. What are some other examples of liquids? (Juice, milk, etc.) o On my own if the text prompted you to think of other examples

33 10. Q UESTIONING 8. How can you change a liquid to a solid? (Take away heat) o Author and me if used the information about heat in the text and your prior knowledge 9. Were there instances when the text didn’t make sense? What fix-ups did you use? o Unknown words: context clues

34 10. Q UESTIONING : R EADING P ERSPECTIVES 10. Think like a mathematician: What sections and details from the text would be of greatest interest to a math expert? Why? o The measure of temperature = calculating the freezing and melting points of matter (Celsius) 10. Think like a historian: What sections and details from the text would be of greatest interest to a history expert? Why? o The three states of matter = when they were discovered and which scientists studied the differences and similarities between them

35 10. Q UESTIONING : C HECK FOR U NDERSTANDING What do all states of matter have in common? 1. Rapid moving particles 1. Can change with heat 1. Take the shape of their container 1. Have a definite volume

36 S TRATEGY : PROCESS DRAMA Description: a teaching method that involves children in imaginary, unscripted, and spontaneous scenes, in which the meaning is made from the engagement and transactions between the teacher and students. Purpose: used after reading to review, summarize, or increase understanding of the text. It can help students work through complex or abstract texts.

37 S TRATEGY : PROCESS DRAMA Steps: 1. Read the text. 2. Discuss and explain the text and new words/concepts. 3. Give students any materials they may need. 4. Give them time to plan their drama. 5. Do their process drama. (Ong,B., 2010)

38 S TRATEGY : PROCESS DRAMA Model: The Plant Cycle by Nina Morgan (Morgan, 1993) The Four Seasons Fall To act out fall, I could pretend like I am a tree and my leaves are falling. Winter To act out winter, I could pretend like my hands are really cold.

39 S TRATEGY : PROCESS DRAMA Guided Practice: The Four Seasons o Spring Who can act out the season of spring? You could make it rain with your hands. You could pretend you are a growing flower. o Summer Who can act out the season of summer? You could make a sun with your arms and hands. You could pretend to be hot!

40 S TRATEGY : PROCESS DRAMA Independent practice: Within your groups, I want you to do a process drama acting out what the particles are doing in each of the three states of matter. Group one: the particles in a solid Group two: the particles in a liquid Group three: the particles in a gas

41 11. W RITING TO L EARN A. Strategy name: Venn diagram Purpose: to compare and contrast the three states of matter. Description: A diagram using circles to represent sets, with the position and overlap of the circles indicating the relationships between the sets. Steps: 1. Create the outline of a Venn diagram 2. Preview teacher model 3. Review your text 4. Write similarities and differences (solid, liquid, gas) in the appropriate circles

42 11. W RITING TO L EARN : T ECHNOLOGY & S TRATEGY S TEPS 1. Go to my.wartburg (CARS-collaboration-forums- SIL Presentation-Ashley’s SIL) php/venn_intro php/venn_intro 2. Click on the three-circle diagram 3. Enter in the title (The Three States of Matter) and the three factors (Solids, Liquids, & Gases) 4. Click and type in the appropriate circles, characteristics of each state of matter 5. Click and type in the appropriate circles, similarities between the three states of matter

43 11. W RITING TO L EARN : T ECHNOLOGY & S TRATEGY M ODEL

44 11. W RITING TO L EARN : T EXT MODEL The Three States of Matter Liquid water is found in many places. You see liquid water coming out of the faucet, when it rains, and running in a river. Pure liquid water is free of salt, rocks, soil, and garbage. Ice, snow, and frost are examples of water in the solid state. Liquid water freezes at 0 degrees Celsius. Celsius is a scale that measures temperature. What instrument do you use to measure temperature? Winter is a season that you see a lot of solid water. Other examples of solid water are ice cubes, icicles, and ice on a skating rink.

45 11. W RITING TO L EARN C. Guided & independent practice Group one: a Venn diagram with the circles labeled and some characteristics filled in Group two: a blank Venn diagram Group three: a blank Venn diagram with strips of paper, including odd-balls, to sort into the three different circles (writing in additional characteristics)

46 11. W RITING TO L EARN : C OMPLETED V ENN DIAGRAM

47 12. C LOSURE Our purpose of our lesson today was to become informed about the three states of matter. Let’s see if we met our purpose by answering the following questions. o What did we learn about the three states of matter? o Review the Venn diagram o What did we learn about the particles within each state of matter? o Review the process drama

48 12. C LOSURE What conclusions can we draw about the three states of matter and their similarities and differences? The particles in a solid are slow and tightly packed. The particles in a liquid are more spaced out. The particles in a gas are very spaced out and move rapidly. How can we use this to predict what would happen if we add heat to an object? If the object is a liquid, it would go through a physical change and become a gas. If the object was a solid, it would go through a physical change and become a liquid.

49 12. C LOSURE Why were the following strategies helpful? o Matching activity o ( to develop new vocabulary words) o Walk through of the text o (to identify different parts of the text and predict the content) o Process drama o (to better understand the particle movements in the three states of matter [Reading Standard]) o QAR questions o (to connect different parts of text & use our own knowledge) o Venn diagram o (to compare and contrast the similarities and differences in the three states of matter [Writing Standard] )

50 12. C LOSURE When and how could you use the Venn diagram again? o When comparing things with similarities and differences To separate closely related ideas/concepts before writing How could you adapt the Venn diagram? o Make more or less circles o Increase/decrease the characteristics

51 R EFERENCES Morgan, N. (1993). The plant cycle. (p. 14). New York, NY: Thomas Learning Ong,B. (2010) A play of protein synthesis in the classroom. The American Biology Teacher, 72, ds-liquids-gases.htm https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&c d=4&cad=rja&ved=0CEMQFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.w ashoecountyschools.net%2Fwashoesip%2Fuserfiles%2Ffile%2FE LA%2F5th%2520Grade%2FScience%2F5th%2520IT%2520State s%2520of%2520Matter% doc&ei=gChkUtuiD8er2gWWo 4DoDw&usg=AFQjCNGL4iJor9wmnXUNJ1IstFn9IP9xOw&sig2 =gXZ8xwZwbeeFc6pCFImnaw


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