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Water in its Solid, Liquid and Gaseous States Big Idea 8: Properties of Matter Grade 2 Topic 4 Division of Academics - Department of Science.

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Presentation on theme: "Water in its Solid, Liquid and Gaseous States Big Idea 8: Properties of Matter Grade 2 Topic 4 Division of Academics - Department of Science."— Presentation transcript:

1 Water in its Solid, Liquid and Gaseous States Big Idea 8: Properties of Matter Grade 2 Topic 4 Division of Academics - Department of Science

2 Benchmarks SC.2.P.8.4 Observe and describe water in its solid, liquid, and gaseous states. SC.2.N.1.1 Raise questions about the natural world, investigate them in teams through free exploration and systematic observations, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations. SC.2.N.1.2 Compare the observations made by different groups using the same tools. SC.2.N.1.1 Raise questions about the natural world, investigate them in teams through free exploration and systematic observations, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations. SC.2.N.1.2 Compare the observations made by different groups using the same tools. LAFS.2.RI.2.4Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area LAFS.2.SL.1.1 Participate in collaborative conversations about topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. Division of Academics - Department of Science

3 Water Water, water everywhere, water all around. Water in the ocean, water in the ground. Water in a river, water in a creek, Water in a faucet with a drip-drip leak! Water in a fountain, water in a lake, Water on a flower, as day begins to break. Water from a waterfall, rushing down from high. Water from a dark cloud, raining from the sky. Water boiling hot, water frozen ice, Water in a blue lagoon, clean and clear and nice. Water at a fire, gushing through a hose, Water in a garden, so every flower grows. Water for the animals swimming in the sea, Water, water everywhere for you and for me!

4 Observing Drops of Water 1. Use an eye dropper to place a single drop of water on a ordinary paper. What happens? Why? 2. Place a single drop of water on waxed paper? What happens? Why? 3. Add another drop of water on the wax paper. Use a toothpick to pull the two drops together. What happens? Then try to pull a drop out. What happens? Why?

5 What did you learn about water drops? Water as a liquid is sticky and elastic. Water tends to clump together in drops rather than spread out in a thin film. Division of Academics - Department of Science

6 Experiment: How many drops of water can fit on a penny? Materials – penny, eyedropper, water Predict how many drops of water will fit on a penny. Record. Then start to add one drop at a time to the top of the penny. Record. Did your data support your prediction? Were you surprised to see how many drops fit on the penny?. Division of Academics - Department of Science

7 Observing Ice in Water (Record observations in your notebook.) 1.Create a Data Chart: Adding Ice in Water 2.Fill a cup with halfway full with water. 3.Take the water’s temperature and record. 4.Add an ice cube to a cup of water. Observe. 5.What does the ice do in the water? Record your observations. 6.After 2 minutes, take the temperature again and record. Repeat after 5 min. Record. After 10 min. Record. 7.Compare the temperature recorded at each of the interval times. What did you observe? 8.What happened to the ice? Division of Academics - Department of Science

8 Data Chart : Adding Ice in Water TimeDegrees in CelsiusDegrees in Fahrenheit Starting After 2 minutes After 5 minutes After 10 minutes Division of Academics - Department of Science Conclusion: +

9 What did you observe about WATER as a SOLID - ICE? Water as a solid (ice) floats in liquid water. The ice lowers the temperature of the water when added. Division of Academics - Department of Science

10 Solids, Liquids, and Gases Solids, Liquids, and Gases Reading Passage link: Solids, Liquids, and GasesSolids, Liquids, and Gases

11 water water What is else is special about water compared to other natural substances? water Water Water Water is the only natural substance that can be found in all three states. Division of Academics - Department of Science

12 Changing States of Water Changing States of Water Let’s explore Changing States of Water Changing States of Water Learn about the changing states of water as you experiment with different temperatures in this interactive online activity. You will play around with ice, water and steam to find out what happens when you heat and cool either of them. Reflect 1.What happens when water reaches 100 degrees? 2.Does water or ice take up a larger volume? 3.What happens if you try heating the steam to high temperatures? 4. What happens when you turn water to gas and back to a liquid again ? Division of Academics - Department of Science

13 Changing States Changing States Let’s explore Water Changing States Changing States Office of Academics - Department of Science

14 Reflection 1. Why do you think that the particles in a gas are farther apart than in a liquid? Answer: When enough heat is added to a liquid, it evaporates to form a gas. So a gas has more heat energy than a solid. This makes the particles move further away from each other when they are in the gaseous state. Office of Academics - Department of Science

15 Reflection 2. Predict how water in a tray would react if heat was taken away (placed in a freezer), rather than added. Answer: If the temperature of the liquid decreased until it reached its freezing point, then the liquid would condense into a solid – liquid water to ice. Division of Academics - Department of Science

16 When does WATER change state? Water changes state when enough heat energy is added to it or removed from it. Division of Academics - Department of Science

17 What is the difference between water as a solid, a liquid, and a gas? Answer: In solids, particles are close together because there is less heat energy. Liquids have more heat energy so the particles are farther apart. Gases have even more heat energy and the particles are further apart than in the solids or the liquids. Division of Academics - Department of Science

18 WATER FACT Water freezes at 32° Fahrenheit (F) or 0° on the Celsius scale. Division of Academics - Department of Science

19 WATER Fact Water boils at 212° Fahrenheit (F) or 100° on the Celsius scale. Division of Academics - Department of Science

20 Brain Check Word Bank: air container gas block milk solid shape freezing melting water chair liquid 1. The three basic states of matter are ____ ____, and ______. 2. Liquids take the shape of their _________. 3. Solids have a definite _______ and volume. 4. A _____ and _____ are examples of solids. 5. _____ and _______ are examples of liquids. Division of Academics - Department of Science

21 6. _______ is an example of a gas. 7. Solid ice is____________ when it is changing into a liquid. 8. Water is ______________ at 0° Celsius. Division of Academics - Department of Science Brain Check Word Bank: air gas block milk solid freezing shape melting water liquids

22 Reflection Write down words that can describe water as a: Solid Liquid Gas Division of Academics - Department of Science Use your responses to create a poster or foldable: Three States of Water.


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