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Big Question: How can our actions result in unexpected consequences? Author: Lulu Delacre Genre: Realistic Fiction.

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Presentation on theme: "Big Question: How can our actions result in unexpected consequences? Author: Lulu Delacre Genre: Realistic Fiction."— Presentation transcript:

1 Big Question: How can our actions result in unexpected consequences? Author: Lulu Delacre Genre: Realistic Fiction

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3  Story Sort Story Sort Story Sort VocabularyWords Vocabulary Words:  Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games  Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack  Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary  Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words

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5 famous invention election furious imagination education nervous explanation various decision relaxation conversation tension humorous exhibition attraction invasion creation occupation destination cancellation summarization glamorous mysterious administration

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7  algae  concealed  driftwood  hammocks  lamented  sea urchins  sternly  tweezers  cockles  dislodged  emphatically  encounters  frightened  hailing  strange Vocabulary Words More Words to Know

8 Question of the Day How can our actions result in unexpected consequences?

9  Build Concepts  Draw Conclusions  Visualize  Build Background  Vocabulary  Fluency: Characterization/Dialogue  Grammar: Modifiers  Spelling: Suffixes –ous, -sion, -ion, -ation  Unexpected Situations

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11  Listen as I read “On the Banks of Plum Creek.”  As I read, notice how I emphasize words that describe characters’ thoughts and feelings and their dialogue.  Be ready to answer questions after I finish.

12  How does Mary feel about the grasshoppers? Why?  Why is the grasshopper invasion devastating for the family?

13  encounters – comes into contact with  frightened – feeling afraid or alarmed  hailing – pouring down in a heavy shower  strange – unusual; odd; peculiar

14 Concept Vocabulary (To add information to the graphic organizer, click on end show, type in your new information, and save your changes.)

15 Nature Feelings Unexpected Situations

16 Draw Conclusion, Visualize Turn to Page 634 – 635.

17 Things You See Things to Do Plants and Animals Beach

18  This week’s audio explores interesting sea creatures. After you listen, we will discuss what you found most interesting and what you found most surprising.

19 Vocabulary Words

20  algae – group of related living things, mostly living in water algae  concealed – put out of sight; hidden  driftwood – wood carried along by water or washed ashore from the waterdriftwood  hammocks – hang beds or couches made of canvas, cord, etc.hammocks

21  lamented – felt or showed grief for  sea urchins – small, round sea animals with spiny shellssea urchins  sternly – strictly; firmly  tweezers – small pincers for picking up small objectstweezers

22  cockles – saltwater clams with two-ridged, heart-shaped shellscockles  dislodged – driven or forced out of place or position  emphatically – said or done forcefully; strongly  (next slide) (next slide)

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29 GrammarModifiers

30  jacques cousteau was a famus undersee explorer  Jacques Cousteau was a famous undersea explorer.  lets see the exibition of marine life  Let’s see the exhibition of marine life.

31  One Saturday in May, I was awakened at the crack of dawn.  In May is a prepositional phrase used as an adjective to tell which Saturday. At the crack of dawn combines two prepositional phrases used as an adverb to tell when the narrator was awakened.

32  Adjectives, adverbs, and prepositional phrases are modifiers, words or groups of words that tell more about, or modify, other words in a sentence.

33  Adjectives modify nouns and pronouns.  Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.  Prepositional phrases can act as adjectives or adverbs.

34  As Adjective: The towel on top is mine.  As Adverb: A crab ran under a rock.

35  To avoid confusion, place modifiers close to the words they modify.  Adjective phrases usually come right after the word they modify.  Adverb phrases may appear right after a verb or at the beginning of a sentence.

36  The meaning of a sentence can be unclear if the modifier is misplaced.  No:The girl set out a picnic in a red bathing suit.  Yes:The girl in a red bathing suit set out a picnic.

37  The position of only in a sentence can affect the sentence’s entire meaning. Place only directly before the word or words it modifies.

38  Example: Only he ate oysters. (Nobody else ate them.)  He only ate oysters. (He didn’t do anything except eat.)  He ate only oysters.(He ate nothing else.)

39  I love a day at the beach.  prepositional phrases  A wave crashed loudly.  adverb  The sand is hot!  adjective

40  I see a tiny jellyfish!  adjective  One stung me on the foot.  prepositional phrase  That really hurt.  adverb

41  My cousin joined us at the beach from Alaska.  My cousin from Alaska joined us at the beach.  Children must be accompanied by an adult under 15 years of age.  Children under 15 years of age must be accompanied by an adult.

42  Hildie got a bad sunburn in the car and cried.  Hildie got a bad sunburn and cried in the car.

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44 famous invention election furious imagination education nervous explanation various decision relaxation conversation tension humorous exhibition attraction invasion creation occupation destination cancellation summarization glamorous mysterious administration

45 Question of the Day How would you characterize the children’s actions at the beach?

46  Dictionary/Glossary  Draw Conclusions  Sequence  Vocabulary  Fluency: Choral Reading  Grammar: Modifiers  Spelling: Suffixes –ous, -sion, -ion, -ation  Science: Ocean Reefs  Unexpected Situations

47 Vocabulary Strategy: Dictionary/Glossary Turn to Page

48 At the Beach Turn to Page

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50  Turn to page 645.  As I read, notice how I change my voice to differentiate the speakers.  We will practice as a class doing three choral readings.

51 GrammarModifiers

52  the minnows was darting between sam and i  The minnows were darting between Sam and me.  dad cooked too fish he had caught over a camp fire  Over a campfire, Dad cooked two fish he had caught.

53  Adjectives, adverbs, and prepositional phrases are modifiers, words or groups of words that tell more about nouns, pronouns, or verbs.  Adjectives modify nouns and pronouns. Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs.  Prepositional phrases can act as adjectives or adverbs.

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55 famous invention election furious imagination education nervous explanation various decision relaxation conversation tension humorous exhibition attraction invasion creation occupation destination cancellation summarization glamorous mysterious administration

56 Question of the Day What did the entire family, including the adults, learn as a result of the unexpected events at the beach?

57  Draw Conclusions  Visualize  Vocabulary  Fluency: Characterization/Dialogue  Grammar: Modifiers  Spelling: Suffixes –ous, -sion, -ion, -ation  Science: Sea Urchins  Unexpected Situations

58 At the Beach Turn to Page

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60  Turn to page 649, the conversation between Fernando, his mother, and cousins.  As I read, notice how I use my voice to show the emotions of the characters.  Now we will practice together as a class by doing three choral readings.

61 GrammarModifiers

62  the girl taked pictures of them gold fish  The girl took pictures of the those goldfish.  soon uncle bob will make a desition  Soon Uncle Bob will make a decision.

63  Adjectives, adverbs, and prepositional phrases are modifiers, words or groups of words that tell more about nouns, pronouns, or verbs.  Adjectives modify nouns and pronouns. Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs.  Prepositional phrases can act as adjectives or adverbs.

64  Nouns and verbs alone cannot give readers a complete picture of your topic. Use adjectives, adverbs, and prepositional phrases to show exactly what you mean.  Vague: Clouds drifted.  Exact: A few wispy clouds drifted lazily across the blue sky.

65  Review something you have written to see if you can improve it by adding modifiers to give a more complete picture.

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67 famous invention election furious imagination education nervous explanation various decision relaxation conversation tension humorous exhibition attraction invasion creation occupation destination cancellation summarization glamorous mysterious administration

68 Question of the Day Have you ever seen a bat in the wild (not in a zoo)? What was the bat doing when you saw it?

69  Legend  Reading Across Texts  Fluency: Partner Reading  Grammar: Modifiers  Spelling: Suffixes –ous, -sion, - ion, -ation  Unexpected Situations

70 “The Eagle and the Bat” Turn to Page

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72  Turn to page 649.  Read the conversation three times with a partner. Be sure to read with proper emotion and offer each other feedback.

73 GrammarModifiers

74  the guide with a square top pointed out the unussual light house  The guide pointed out the unusual lighthouse with a square top.  the beach is the better place of all to go for relaxasion  The beach is the best place of all to go for relaxation.

75  Adjectives, adverbs, and prepositional phrases are modifiers, words or groups of words that tell more about nouns, pronouns, or verbs.  Adjectives modify nouns and pronouns. Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs.  Prepositional phrases can act as adjectives or adverbs.

76  Test Tip: Mistakes with only usually happen when its placement in a sentence makes the meaning unclear. Think about what word only modifies in a sentence. Then decide whether it is placed correctly.  Unclear: Only take advice from Pat.  Clear: Take advice from Pat only.

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78 famous invention election furious imagination education nervous explanation various decision relaxation conversation tension humorous exhibition attraction invasion creation occupation destination cancellation summarization glamorous mysterious administration

79 Question of the Day How can our actions result in unexpected consequences?

80  Build Concept Vocabulary  Draw Conclusions  Dictionary/Glossary  Grammar: Modifiers  Spelling: Suffixes –ous, -sion, -ion, -ation  Follow and Clarify Directions  Unexpected Situations

81  Active readers draw logical conclusions, or make decisions, based on information in the text and on their own knowledge.  Examine your own conclusions as you read. Ask yourself, “Can I support them with information from the text or with facts I already know?”

82  Authors also draw conclusions in their writing. Good readers ask themselves: “Are these author’s conclusions logical? Are they based on facts?”

83  A short story is a short, fictional narrative that contains all story elements—setting, characterization, plot, and theme.  Short stories are generally about one character or a limited number of characters and one event, or a series of closely-related events.

84  Short stories are shorter in length than books or novels.

85  You sometimes need to use a dictionary or glossary to learn the meanings of unfamiliar words.  Dictionary entries provide multiple meanings, parts of speech, and pronunciation keys.  Use a dictionary to find the part of speech and definition of these words.

86 WordPart of SpeechMeaning balmy waft dominoes

87  Directions are instructions that explain how to do something, and are usually in the form of a numbered list.  Directions should be read through completely before beginning the first step. This helps you identify and understand the task before you begin.

88  When you follow the directions, you go through the explanation one step at a time.  Visualizing each step and the end result helps you understand where the task is going.

89  If any part of the directions are not clear, stop to clarify the directions. To do this, reread the directions or ask questions.

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91 GrammarModifiers

92  will you put this here sun block on my back  Will you put this sunblock on my back?  to much sun damage skin, it may cause cancer later in life  Too much sun damages skin. It may cause cancer later in life.

93  Adjectives, adverbs, and prepositional phrases are modifiers, words or groups of words that tell more about nouns, pronouns, or verbs.  Adjectives modify nouns and pronouns. Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs.  Prepositional phrases can act as adjectives or adverbs.

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95 famous invention election furious imagination education nervous explanation various decision relaxation conversation tension humorous exhibition attraction invasion creation occupation destination cancellation summarization glamorous mysterious administration

96  Story test  Classroom webpage,  Reading Test  AR  Other Reading Quizzes  Quiz #


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