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Welcome!. Healthy Schools 2020 Video Purpose of Today’s Session… Find out about the Champlain Declaration and Healthy Schools 2020 Learn about healthy.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome!. Healthy Schools 2020 Video Purpose of Today’s Session… Find out about the Champlain Declaration and Healthy Schools 2020 Learn about healthy."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome!

2 Healthy Schools 2020 Video

3 Purpose of Today’s Session… Find out about the Champlain Declaration and Healthy Schools 2020 Learn about healthy school nutrition environments and the new School Food & Beverage Policy (P/PM 150) Understand my role in supporting healthy school nutrition environments Acquire tips, tools, and resources for making positive changes

4 CCPN Priority Initiatives

5 Priority Areas for Action 1.Healthy lunches & food service contracts (PPM 150) 2.Healthy fundraising 3.Healthy classroom rewards

6 Part of a whole-school approach! Adapted from Nutrition Tools for Schools © 2007

7 School Baseline Survey To assess current activity in the nutrition priority areas Completed by all nine school boards (2010): 54.7% Report available at

8 Survey Highlights Commonly Cited Barriers: Analyzing the foods to ensure compliance with nutritional guidelines Availability of vendors which can meet guidelinesSupports “Training for all staff and for parents in making healthier eating options and making these choices on a budget.” “Additional literature to be given out to parents.”

9 Healthy School Nutrition Environments

10 Our Children are at Nutritional Risk! 68 % of boys (9-13 yrs) consuming < 5 daily servings of vegetables & fruit 83 % of girls (10-16 yrs) who do not have 3 daily servings of milk products 10 # of teaspoons of sugar in one can of soft drink 60 % increase in risk of becoming overweight for each additional daily serving of a sugar-sweetened beverage (children, 1.5 yr-period) 1000 Amount of sodium (mg) in one large slice of pizza 1200 Adequate intake of sodium (mg) per day for children aged 4-8

11 Are Our Children at Nutritional Risk? 68% of boys (9-13 yrs) are consuming < 5 daily servings of vegetables & fruit 83% of girls (10-16 yrs) who do not have 3 daily servings of milk products One can of soft drink has 10 teaspoons of sugar TRUE! And for each additional daily serving of sugar-sweetened beverage, there is a 60% increase in risk of becoming overweight (children, 1.5 yr-period) One large slice of pizza contains 1,000 mg of sodium TRUE! 1,200 is the adequate intake of sodium (mg) per day for children aged 4-8 TRUE!

12 What is a Healthy School Nutrition Environment (HSNE)?

13 It All Adds Up! MondayJack’s birthday - mom sends doughnuts TuesdayBake sale fundraiser - Jack has cupcake at 11:30 WednesdayGrade eight fundraiser – large cookies for sale at lunch ThursdayValentine’s Day – classroom celebration with candy, cake etc. Friday‘Special food’ day – pizza, pop, chips

14 Your School Nutrition Environment Take a moment to reflect on your current school nutrition environment. Think about all the venues, events, programs, and scenarios where foods & beverages are currently offered and sold in your school. What/ where are some of the challenges (opportunities)? (2-3 min) OPTIONAL: As parents, what are some of the challenges in providing healthy foods for your kids?

15 The Healthy Food for Healthy Schools Act, Trans Fat Standards Regulation (O.Reg. 200/08): Introduced by MOE – April 2008 Full implementation – Sept School Food and Beverage Policy (P/PM 150): Introduced by MOE – Jan Full implementation – Sept. 1, 2011

16 School Food and Beverage Policy (P/PM 150) The policy applies to all: publicly-funded elementary and secondary schools in Ontario food and beverages offered for sale in all venues (e.g., cafeterias, vending machines, tuck shops), through all programs (e.g., catered lunch programs), and at all events (e.g., bake sales) on school property

17 School Food and Beverage Policy (con’t) The policy does not apply to food and beverages: Offered in schools to students at no cost Brought from home/ purchased off school property and not for resale in schools Purchased during field trips Sold in schools for non-school purposes (e.g., sold by an outside organization that is using the gymnasium after school hours for a non-school-related event) Sold for fundraising activities that occur off school premises Sold in staff rooms

18 School Food and Beverage Policy (con’t) Special-Event Days: The school principal may designate up to ten days (or fewer, as determined by the school board) as special-event days on which the food and beverages offered for sale in schools would be exempt from the nutrition standards outlined in the policy. School principals: must consult with the school council prior to designating a day as a special-event day are encouraged to consult with their students in making these decisions

19 School Food and Beverage Policy (con’t) School boards and schools will also need to: comply with the Trans Fat Standards take into consideration the strategies developed under the board’s policy on anaphylaxis practice safe food handling and storage ensure students have access to drinking water take into consideration the diversity of students and staff in order to accommodate religious and/or cultural needs

20 School Food and Beverage Policy (con’t) School boards and schools will be encouraged to: choose Ontario food and beverages first (e.g., offer Ontario grown and/ or produced food and beverages when available and practical) be environmentally aware (e.g., reduce food waste, reuse containers, recycle food scraps) avoid offering food or beverages as a reward or incentive for good behaviour, achievement or participation (more on this to follow!)

21 Nutrition Standards Food is divided into six groups: Vegetables and Fruit Grain Products Milk and Alternatives Meat and Alternatives Mixed Dishes Miscellaneous Items Beverages are divided into two groups: Elementary Schools Secondary Schools

22 Products in this category are the healthiest options and generally have higher levels of essential nutrients and lower amounts of fat, sugar, and/or sodium. Sell Most Sell Less Not Permitted For Sale Products in this category may have slightly higher amounts of fat, sugar, and/or sodium than food and beverages in the Sell Most category. Products in this category generally contain few or no essential nutrients and/or contain high amounts of fat, sugar, and/or sodium (e.g., deep-fried and other fried foods, confectionery items). Nutrition Standards

23 Product GroupSub- Group NotesCategory Wiener – low-fat frankfurter (1 frankfurter) Meat and Alternatives Fresh and Frozen Meat Trans fat – OK Fat – OK Sodium – too high Not Permitted for Sale Categorizing Food and Beverages Example:

24 Nutrition Standards: The 80/20 Rule Products in this category must make up at least 80 per cent of all food choices and all beverage choices that are available for sale in all venues, through all programs, and at all events. Sell Most Sell Less Not Permitted For Sale Products in this category must make up no more than 20 per cent of all food choices and all beverage choices that are available for sale in all venues, through all programs, and at all events. Food and beverages in this category must not be sold in schools. ≥80% ≤20% 0%

25 Nutrition Standards: Food Choices A food choice is a specific type of food that is offered for sale: An apple is one food choice and an orange is another food choice. A Red Delicious apple is one food choice and a McIntosh apple is another food choice. A bran muffin is one food choice and a banana muffin is another food choice. However, five apples of the same variety (e.g., five Empire apples) are considered one “food choice” for the purposes of calculating the 80/20 rule.

26 Basketball Tournament An elementary school is hosting a basketball tournament and will be selling food and beverages to parents and students. Below are the items that will be offered for sale. Food Choices:Beverage Choices:  Apples – same variety (Sell Most)  Baked Potato Chips (Sell Most)  Whole Grain Cereal bars (Sell Most)  Pizza Slices (whole grain crust, lower fat cheese and vegetable toppings) (Sell Most)  Popcorn (Sell Less)  Bottled Water (Sell Most)  100% apple juice 250 ml (Sell Most)  1% milk 250 ml (Sell Most) Question: Does this event comply with the 80/20 rule? Applying the 80/20 Rule

27 Basketball Tournament Answer – Yes. This event does comply with the 80/20 rule. Food Choices:Beverage Choices:  Apples – same variety (Sell Most)  Baked Potato Chips (Sell Most)  Whole Grain Cereal bars (Sell Most)  Pizza Slices (whole grain crust, lower fat cheese and vegetable toppings) (Sell Most)  Popcorn (Sell Less)  Bottled Water (Sell Most)  100% apple juice 250 ml (Sell Most)  1% milk 250 ml (Sell Most) Food Choices:Beverage Choices: Total number of choices = 5  Sell Most choices = 4 (80%)  Sell Less choices = 1 (20%) Total number of choices = 3  Sell Most choices = 3 (100%)  Sell Less choices = 0 (0%)

28 Currently Available Resource Guide 2010 Quick Reference Guide 2010 Online training (e-learning modules) o Nutrition Standards Tool o Creating Healthy Menus Tool Calculating Trans Fat Information Sheet FAQs Coming Soon (check the website for updates) Elementary Teacher Resource Guide Elementary Teacher e-learning modules Available at healthyschools healthyschools Resources: Ministry of Education

29 At-A-Glance Guide Bake It Up! Tasty treats for healthier school bake sales Available at Nutrition Resource Centre

30 Ottawa Public Health Contact your school public health nurse Eastern Ontario Health Unit Contact your school health liaison or call Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit Contact your school public health nurse or visit Renfrew County & District Health Unit Contact your health unit school contact or call Other Supports: Public Health Units

31 Free service available to all Ontarians to access a Registered Dietitian Website with videos, interactive tools, articles, tips and recipes School Project Specialist available to answer questions on the School Food and Beverage Policy o o toll-free, Other Supports: EatRight Ontario

32 QUESTIONS

33 DISCUSSION Think back to your reflections about your current school nutrition environment, and some of the challenges (opportunities) that exist. What steps could you take to move towards improving the quality of food and beverage offerings in your school environment? (2-3 min) OPTIONAL: As parents, what knowledge & skills would be helpful in supporting healthy eating in your home?

34 BREAK

35 Priority Areas for Action

36 Priority 1: Healthy Catered Lunches

37 Survey Results: Foods in Schools In the Champlain region… Common foods sold or served in elementary and secondary schools: 1.Pizza (60.4%) 2.Hot dogs & hamburgers (39.9%) 3.Juice that is not 100% (31.2%) 4.Regular potato chips (26.5%) 5.Soft drinks (24.8%)

38 At least 3 of 4 food groups Fresh, wholesome ingredients Healthy preparation A Healthy Lunch!

39 MONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAYTHURSDAY HolidayPizza Sub Pasta Salad Cookie Tomato soup ½ chicken finger wrap with lettuce & mayo Turkey wrap (w lettuce mayo grated cheese) Pasta salad Cookie Ham Wrap (w lettuce & cheese) Salad Yogurt Chicken Burger Pasta Salad Cookie Chicken Nuggets Caesar Salad Cookie Pizza Pepperoni Sub Soup Yogurt Cheeseburger Salad Cookie Chicken fingers Salad Cookie Hot Dog Soup Yogurt Pogo Salad Cookie ½ Chicken Caesar wrap Salad Cookie Hot Dog Pasta salad Jello Grilled Cheese Soup Cookie Pogo Salad Yogurt Making Changes… EXISTING MENU AS SUBMITTED THROUGH SURVEY, JUNE 2010

40 Catered Lunches: Common ‘flags’ to watch for… Food preparation (fried vs. baked) Salad dressings & condiments Processed meat & cheese products Luncheon meats Breaded products (e.g. chicken strips) Fruit drinks, punches, and ‘ades’ (vs. 100% juice) Bread (grain) products (white vs. whole wheat)

41 Priority 2: Healthy Fundraising

42 Survey Results: Fundraising In the Champlain region… 85.9 % of schools use food for fundraising Most common fundraising foods are: –Pizza (38.3%) –Bake Sale Items (34.2%) –Chocolate (28.5%) –BBQ Items (i.e. hotdogs) (15.8%)

43 Healthy Fundraising To raise money by using non-food items or the healthiest food and beverages (on and off school premises) Apple - gram Bike-a-thon Silent auction Book sale

44 Will we lose money?!? BC – Over half of schools no change in fundraising revenue when switch to healthier options (Act Now BC, 2008) US – schools in many US states – no decrease in revenue, many have seen a net gain (Wharton, et al, 2008)

45 Priority 3: Healthy Classroom Rewards

46 Survey Results: Classroom Rewards In the Champlain region… 91% of teachers give children rewards for good behaviour: –Privileges (81.4%) –Stickers (71.3%) –Food (42.3%) –Beverages (4.7%)

47 Survey Results: Classroom Rewards 25.6 % 40 %

48 Rewarding with Food Why not? Encourages emotional eating Adds unnecessary calories, sugar, fat to the diet Undermines nutrition education at school and at home Establishes poor dietary practices

49 Choose Non-food Rewards! Privileges Stickers Erasers Bouncy balls Pencils Bookmarks Frisbees Hacky sacks

50 Paving the way! Steps for Success Assess: What is your school doing now? Consult your school community (parents, school council, vendors). Just ask! Decide what to offer/ sell Promote and communicate!

51 Principals: What can you do? Control what you can (in-school vs. off-school) Create a support network of champions (teachers, parents, students, food vendors, other community partners) Be a positive role model, e.g. healthy refreshments for meetings/ events Support nutrition initiatives in your school Consider a nutrition policy for your school Recognize and celebrate your schools’ successes, e.g. on school websites, in parent newsletters

52 Teachers: What can you do? Control what you can – your classrooms Integrate nutrition messages across the curriculum Link healthy eating instruction to school events Be aware of activities/ policies related to nutrition in your school Consider joining the schools’ nutrition committee Be a positive role model Be cautious of ‘food policing’

53 School Councils: What can you do? Recommend and support non-food or healthy food fundraisers for your school (on and off school property) Engage with food providers – ask for healthy alternatives for school lunch programs and events (e.g. BBQs) Create a support network of champions (principal/VP, teachers, parents, students, food vendors, other community partners) Be a positive role model: –Ensure healthy refreshments for council meetings –Pack healthy lunches and snacks for your child –Reward good behaviour with non-food rewards

54 DISCUSSION What are some of the successes or things your school is doing well in terms of creating a healthy school nutrition environment? Provide specific ideas/ examples in the following 3 areas: 1.Healthy lunches & food service contracts 2.Healthy fundraising 3.Healthy classroom rewards (5-10 min)

55 More Resources Workshop Report A compilation of ideas from 9 regional workshops on healthy school nutrition environments Available at

56 Workshop Report

57 More Resources NUTRITION TOOLS FOR SCHOOLS©  Program consisting of a toolkit and public health support  Comprehensive approach to healthy eating (aligns with Foundations for a Healthy School Framework)  Will help schools meet P/PM 150 and go above and beyond to create a healthy school nutrition environment  Contact your public health unit!

58 Know More Do More! Building healthy active families Physical activity & healthy eating Children aged 4 to 12 Parents as agents of change: Offer solutions Empower action Healthy active living tips

59 QUESTIONS

60 Tips for Teaching Healthy Eating

61 Foundations for a Healthy School framework School Food and Beverage Policy Health And Physical Education Curriculum Health Literacy Students develop the skills needed to access, understand and use information to make healthy decisions. They will be able to understand, evaluate and communicate information in order to promote, maintain and improve health in a variety of settings across their life.

62

63 There are many valuable opportunities for students to learn about healthy eating in a school, including classroom instruction, discussions, and food & beverages in the school environment Subject/ProgramGradesLocation in the Curriculum Kindergarten, 2006 and Full-Day Early Learning – Kindergarten Program (Draft) 2010 Kindergarten Personal Growth and Development Health and Physical Activity Health and Physical Education, Interim Edition, 2010 Grades 1-8 Healthy Living Living Skills Expectations Social Studies, 2004Grades 1-6 Heritage and Citizenship and World Connections Science and Technology, 2007Grades 1,2,3,5,6 Grade 1 Understanding Life Systems Understanding Matter and Energy Teaching Healthy Eating

64 Tips for Teaching Use Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide Teach nutrients vs. calories Teach listening to hunger cues Discuss risks & negative side effects of fad diets (media literacy) Promote health at any size (dispel assumptions based on stereotypes) Instill a positive relationship with food and physical activity

65 Tips for Role Modeling in the Classroom Eat nutritious foods and snacks at school Drink water while teaching Join students in DPA or gym class activity Be conscious of your words and actions about healthy eating, physical activity, and weight

66 Tips for role modeling: Choosing your words Instead of…Focus on… Referring to foods as “good” and “bad” (guilt association) Using positive language such as “everyday” and “sometimes” foods Talking about avoiding fat, sugar, carbs, calories, etc. Teaching the importance of nutrients to learn, grow & play and enjoying a variety of foods Complimenting people on their appearance (e.g. weight loss) Complimenting people on their skills, abilities, and personality traits Associating physical activity with weight loss Promoting physical activity as fun and enjoyable

67 DISCUSSION: Reflecting on Language “You look fantastic! Have you lost weight?” Discuss: What is this statement communicating? What is the underlying impression? What could you say instead? What could you say in response? (5 – 10 min)

68 QUESTIONS

69 Creating change! Bringing it all together…

70 “If you think you are too small to make a difference, you have never been in bed with a mosquito.” - Unknown Becoming a Champion!

71 The Champlain Healthy School-aged Children Initiative was made possible through funding from the Ontario Ministry of Health Promotion and Sport, the Heart and Stroke Foundation, and the Société Santé en français. Acknowledgement


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