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New Elementary Report Card Grades 1, 2, and 3 2006 – 07 COSC November 1, 2006.

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Presentation on theme: "New Elementary Report Card Grades 1, 2, and 3 2006 – 07 COSC November 1, 2006."— Presentation transcript:

1 New Elementary Report Card Grades 1, 2, and – 07 COSC November 1, 2006

2 Implementation Schedule grades 1, 2, grades 1, 2, ECS, grades 4, 5, ECS, grades 4, 5, 6

3 Home-School Communication A report card is one of many ways in which teachers and parents communicate about a student’s learning; other ways include: comments on students’ workcomments on students’ work collections of students’ workcollections of students’ work phone callsphone calls s s meetingsmeetings notes in agendasnotes in agendas student learning logsstudent learning logs meet-the teacher nightmeet-the teacher night celebrations of learningcelebrations of learning

4 The purpose of a report card… …is to confirm with parents their child’s level of achievement relative to provincially set expectations for the grade …is not to compare their child’s achievement to other students in the class or grade Home-School Communication

5 How the student’s achievement compares to expectations How well the student has been applying himself or herself How the student behaves at school How the student could improve The important things we want to say about a student How the student has progressed

6 Home-School Communication Outcome statements Levels: Achievement Effort Learner Attributes Comments: Subjects Learner Attributes How the student’s achievement compares to expectations How well the student has been applying himself or herself How the student behaves at school How the student could improve How the student has progressed Learner Attribute statements

7 Key Features Based on outcomes Based on standards Similar to the previous grade 1-2 report card Different to the previous grade 3 report card

8 What are outcomes? Outcomes are statements that describe what students are expected to know and be able to doOutcomes are statements that describe what students are expected to know and be able to do Outcomes come from the Alberta curriculum for each subjectOutcomes come from the Alberta curriculum for each subjectE.g.: Teachers will report about a student’s achievement of selected key outcomes

9 Examples of Outcomes   Retells main ideas (Gr 1 Language Arts)   Experiments with arranging and recording ideas in a variety of ways (Gr 3 Language Arts)   Expresses an understanding of how the community being studied has changed (Gr 2 Social Studies)   Asks questions that lead to exploration and investigation (Gr 1 Science)   Uses manipulatives, diagrams and symbols to demonstrate and describe the processes of addition and subtraction of numbers to 100. (Gr 2 Mathematics) E.g.:

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13 2.3 demonstrates critical thinking in collecting and interpreting data, planning, implementing and evaluating all aspects of nursing care. 2.4 exercises reasonable judgment and sets justifiable priorities in practice.

14 i)Teachers gather and use information about students’ learning needs and progress. Teachers monitor students’ actions on an ongoing basis to determine and respond to their learning needs. They use a variety of diagnostic methods that include observing students’ activities, analysing students’ learning difficulties and strengths, and interpreting the results of assessments and information provided by students, their parents, colleagues and other professionals. Teachers select and develop a variety of classroom assessment strategies and instruments to assess the full range of learning objectives. They differentiate between classroom and large-scale instruments such as provincial achievement tests, administer both and use the results for the ultimate benefit of students. They record, interpret and use the results of their assessments to modify their teaching practices and students’ learning activities. Teachers help students, parents and other educators interpret and understand the results of diagnoses and assessments, and the implications for students. They also help students develop the ability to diagnose their own learning needs and to assess their progress toward learning goals. Teachers use their interpretations of diagnoses and assessments as well as students’ work and results to guide their own professional growth. They assist school councils and members of the community to understand the purposes, meanings, outcomes and implications of assessments. Ministerial Order (#016/97) Teaching Quality Standard Applicable to the Provision of Basic Education in Alberta

15 assists school councils and members of the community to understand the purposes, meanings, outcomes and implications of assessments.

16 Outcomes in the Report Card Language Arts Mr. E Records ideas and information in ways that make sense Identifies the main idea and supporting details of texts Finds information on a topic, using a variety of sources Writes complete sentences using capitals and periods Uses the computer as a tool for writing Effectively plans and drafts written assignments

17 What are standards? Standards are levels of achievement Standards help teachers describe how well a student has achieved an outcome Teachers will report each student’s achievement by using four levels of achievement and also may use comments

18 Standards or Achievement Levels Excellent Proficient Acceptable Limited

19 Excellent Proficient Acceptable Limited This level describes achievement that is commendable. The student demonstrates an in-depth and broad understanding of a subject outcome at this grade. This level describes achievement that is competent. The student demonstrates a well-developed and consistent understanding of a subject outcome at this grade. This level describes achievement that is adequate. The student demonstrates a basic and/or inconsistent understanding of a subject outcome at this grade. This level describes achievement that is not yet at an acceptable level. The student demonstrates inadequate understanding of a subject outcome at this grade.

20 Advantages of Standards over Percent no matter how hard they work, half of the students are always below averageno matter how hard they work, half of the students are always below average the average is a moving target that may go up or downthe average is a moving target that may go up or down Percentages and class averages can be discouraging for many students, because:

21 Advantages of Standards over Percent standards are targets that can be described and worked toward by teachers and studentsstandards are targets that can be described and worked toward by teachers and students the more a student learns, the closer he or she gets to the targetthe more a student learns, the closer he or she gets to the target Standards can be encouraging for most students, because:

22 Percent don’t always tell us as much as we think they do… Temperature: 23 o C Pressure: kPa Wind speed: 28 kmh Humidity: 69% Visibility: 15 km

23 Percent don’t always tell us as much as we think they do / 5 = Today’s weather… Temperature: 23 o C Pressure: kPa Wind speed: 28 kmh Humidity: 69% Visibility: 15 km %

24 Outcomes and Achievement in the Report Card Language Arts Mr. E Records ideas and information in ways that make senseAcceptable Achievement Identifies the main idea and supporting details of textsAcceptable Achievement Finds information on a topic, using a variety of sourcesProficient Achievement Writes complete sentences using capitals and periodsAcceptable Achievement Uses the computer as a tool for writingAcceptable Achievement Effectively plans and drafts written assignmentsAcceptable Achievement

25 Typical Achievement In a typical mixed ability class, the achievement pattern is likely to be: ExcellentFew students ProficientMost students AcceptableSome students LimitedFew students

26 How teachers determine a student’s level of achievement Teachers use a variety of assessment methods, including: observationsobservations projectsprojects performancesperformances teststests

27 What else does the report communicate?  Achievement  Effort  Learner Attributes

28 Effort Effort is about how much energy a student appears to invest in his or her learning. The levels are: CommendableCommendable AcceptableAcceptable InsufficientInsufficient Teachers will report a student’s effort for each subject by using these levels; they may also use a comment.

29 Achievement and Effort Language ArtsMr. E Records ideas and information in ways that make sense Acceptable Achievement Identifies the main idea and supporting details of texts Acceptable Achievement Finds information on a topic, using a variety of sources Proficient Achievement Writes complete sentences using capitals and periods Acceptable Achievement Uses the computer as a tool for writingAcceptable Achievement Effectively plans and drafts written assignments Acceptable Achievement Effort: Acceptable

30 Learner Attributes Learner attributes describe aspects of students’ work at school that are important for successful learning. Teachers report a student’s learner attributes by using these levels; they may also use a comment. The levels are: ConsistentlyConsistently UsuallyUsually InfrequentlyInfrequently

31 Learner Attributes Social Attributes Respects the rights of othersRespects the rights of others Accepts personal responsibilityAccepts personal responsibility Respects the property of self and othersRespects the property of self and others Cooperates with othersCooperates with others Follows school and classroom rulesFollows school and classroom rules

32 Learner Attributes Work & Study Attributes Listens attentivelyListens attentively Participates in discussionsParticipates in discussions Applies learning strategiesApplies learning strategies Organizes materials and spaceOrganizes materials and space Strives for quality performanceStrives for quality performance Completes tasksCompletes tasks

33 How Learner Attributes are Reported Learner Attributes Mr. E Social Attributes Respects the rights of othersConsistently Accepts personal responsibilityConsistently Respects the property of self and othersUsually Cooperates with othersUsually Follows school and classroom rulesConsistently Work and Study Attributes Listens attentivelyInfrequently Participates in discussionsUsually Applies learning strategiesUsually Organizes materials and spaceConsistently Strives for quality performanceUsually Completes tasksUsually

34 How comments tell you about your child The teacher uses comments to: say more about a student’s learning say more about a student’s effort make suggestions for next term make special mention of something the student achieved describe a student’s progress

35 A Subject Report Language ArtsMr. E Records ideas and information in ways that make sense Acceptable Achievement Identifies the main idea and supporting details of texts Acceptable Achievement Finds information on a topic, using a variety of sources Proficient Achievement Writes complete sentences using capitals and periods Acceptable Achievement Uses the computer as a tool for writingAcceptable Achievement Effectively plans and drafts written assignments Acceptable Achievement Effort: Acceptable Comment: Garnet was able to work through his mini-report on the foods of Inuit people with minimal assistance. He needs to improve his skills in planning for story writing. Garnet participated enthusiastically in the home reading program.

36 A Learner Attributes Report Learner Attributes Mr. E Social Attributes Respects the rights of othersConsistently Accepts personal responsibilityConsistently Respects the property of self and othersUsually Cooperates with othersUsually Follows school and classroom rulesConsistently Work and Study Attributes Listens attentivelyInfrequently Participates in discussionsUsually Applies learning strategiesUsually Organizes materials and spaceConsistently Strives for quality performanceUsually Completes tasksUsually Comment: Garnet has demonstrated respect for staff, students and visitors around the school. He keeps his desk and coat hook area well organized. He could improve his listening skills by looking at the speaker and listening carefully to classmates.

37 Student Input Students have an opportunity to write in their own report card: Reflection – what they think or how they feel about their learningReflection – what they think or how they feel about their learning Goals – what they would like to learnGoals – what they would like to learn Plan – what is important for them to doPlan – what is important for them to do

38 Parent Input Parents have an opportunity to write in their child’s report card: Support – how they intend to support their child’s learningSupport – how they intend to support their child’s learning

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