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SCHOOL PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK (SPF) Clark County School District.

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Presentation on theme: "SCHOOL PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK (SPF) Clark County School District."— Presentation transcript:

1 SCHOOL PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK (SPF) Clark County School District

2 Presentation Objectives  Understand what and so what?  Understand how the School Performance Framework (SPF) works  Understand how pieces fit: Nevada Growth Model, SPF, Autonomous Schools

3 Purpose of School Performance Framework (SPF)  The School Performance Framework (SPF) helps us be accountable for success of every student. While initially holding schools harmless, CCSD will celebrate schools achieving uncommon results. The aim is to identify what works so we can learn and get better faster.  The SPF will be an important addition to the accountability picture.  The SPF is an improvement because it takes into account student growth while recognizing highest performing schools. It helps us focus support on schools that need it most.

4 Nevada Growth Model  Catch Up  Keep Up  Move Up Demonstrated growth, that if sustained, would enable that student to meet or exceed standards on the state assessment in 3 years or by 8 th grade, whichever comes first. Demonstrated growth, that if sustained, would enable that student to continue meeting or exceeding standards on the state assessment in 3 years or by 8 th grade, whichever comes first. Demonstrated growth, that if sustained, would enable that student to exceed standards on the state assessment in 3 years or by 8 th grade, whichever comes first.

5 Drawbacks of NCLB (AYP)  Focus on “bubble kids”  No credit unless proficient  One way to get it right, lots of ways to get it wrong  Little or no support

6 Background  While status still matters, academic growth to a standard is the most important measure of academic achievement. It takes into account where students start (whether they are approaching, meeting, or exceeding standards). And schools receive credit if students progress even if they have not yet reached proficiency.  Under AYP, schools only received credit if students reached proficiency on the state assessment.  The SPF uses Nevada Growth Model results to acknowledge schools that put students on track to: become proficient (“Catch Up”), stay proficient (“Keep Up”), or exceed standards (“Move Up”) in three years or by eighth grade, whichever comes first.

7 Development  May 2011: SPF introduced and described in Superintendent’s policy document “A Look Ahead”  September 2011: Superintendent appoints a 36 member Technical Advisory Panel on Academic Growth Phase 2 (TAP2) including 2 superintendents from rural districts, 2 Nevada Department of Education staff, 2 UNLV Professors, 2 parents, 7 teachers, 6 principals, and central office support staff to advise the Superintendent on how to use Nevada Growth Model data in a School Performance Framework  October 2011 – February 2012  Over 5,000 people including staff, community members, and parents surveyed on SPF weights and elements  Multiple frameworks created, shared, and revised based on feedback from the field  Final version released for trial year (includes spring 2012 & school year)

8 Flowchart: How a School Earns a Score *A School that makes AYP, but earns 30-0 points will be a 2 star school.

9 Five Steps to an Elementary & Middle School’s Score: Step One Step One: Academics matter most  The CCSD is accountable for ALL students being Ready By Exit. Academics is 88 percent of a school’s SPF score.  Growth: How much more has each student learned this year compared to last year? 44 points  Status: Did the students at the school pass the state test and did Catch Up/Keep Up students meet their growth goal targets (Move Up students included next year)? 22 points  Gaps: Are Free and Reduced Lunch, Minority, Special Education, and Limited English Proficient students increasing achievement? 22 points* *Gap points are only calculated for categories with 25 or more students. Schools with 24 or less are held harmless.

10 Five Steps to an Elementary & Middle School’s Score: Step Two Step Two: An excellent school is more than just a test score  The CCSD values a positive learning environment for all students. School Climate is 12 percent of a school’s SPF score.  Attendance: Do 90 percent or more of students attend school daily? 2 points (full points if 92% or higher of students attend daily; half points if %)  Limited English Proficient student equity: Did Limited English Proficient students meet state targets on the English Language Proficiency Assessment (ELPA)? 2 points (half points for increasing)  Special Education student equity: Did the percent of Special Education students in their Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) meet the state target OR the time students spend in their LRE increase? 2 points  Increased rigor: Did 40 percent or more of fifth grade students from the school enroll in accelerated courses in sixth grade? 2 points (full points if 40% or higher; half points if the percentage of fifth grade students enrolling in sixth grade accelerated courses increases)  Engaging students: Did 80 percent or higher of students respond positively on the climate survey? 1 point  Engaging parents: Did the school create a Parent Engagement plan? 3 points

11 Five Steps to an Elementary & Middle School’s Score: Step Two Step Two: An excellent school is more than just a test score  The CCSD values a positive learning environment for all students. School Climate is 12 percent of a school’s SPF score.  Attendance: Do 90 percent or more of students attend school daily? 2 points (full points if 92% or higher of students attend daily; half points if %)  Dropout Rate: Are less than 2 percent of 6 th and 7 th grade students dropping out of middle school? 2 points  Limited English Proficient student equity: Did Limited English Proficient students meet state targets on the English Language Proficiency Assessment (ELPA)? 1 point (half points for increasing)  Special Education student equity: Did the percent of Special Education students in their Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) meet the state target OR the time students spend in their LRE increase? 1 point  Increased rigor: Did 30 percent or higher of 8 th graders enroll in algebra 1? 1 point (full points if 30% or higher; half points if the percentage of students in algebra increases)  Increased rigor: Did 40 percent or higher of students enroll in accelerated courses? 1 point (full points if 40% or higher; half points if the percentage of students enrolled in accelerated courses increases)  Engaging students: Did 80 percent or higher of students respond positively on the climate survey? 1 point  Engaging parents: Did the school create a Parent Engagement plan? 3 points

12 Five Steps to an Elementary & Middle School’s Score: Step Three Step 1: Academics 88 + Step 2: School Climate 12 = 100 percent of a school’s SPF score Step Three: All schools are unique  The CCSD recognizes different schools may have different goals. A met Focus Goal is a 5 percent bonus added to the school’s overall SPF score (added from steps 1 and step 2).  In partnership with Academic Managers, schools choose the annual focus goal their particular school wants to work on. Schools choose how to measure this goal.  A school does not lose percentage points for not accomplishing their focus goal.

13 Five Steps to an Elementary & Middle School’s Score: Step Four Step Four: All systems must be aligned  The CCSD must align with the federal and state accountability systems. Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) is a gatekeeper to the highest ratings and from the lowest rating.  If a school did not make AYP or AYP Watch, the highest rating that school can earn is 3 stars.  If a school made AYP, the lowest rating that school can earn is 2 stars.

14 Five Steps to an Elementary & Middle School’s Score: Step Five Step Five: Transparency plus support equal success.  Every school earns a score based on steps 1-4. However, a school’s designation is based on 2 years of scores. Example:  data (framework released February 2012)  Meets  data (framework released August 2012)  Silver  This school’s 2012 SPF score during the hold harmless year (released August 2012) is Silver  Every school earns an SPF score based on steps 1-4. Different ratings earn differential supports or autonomies. Through transparency, schools will be able to know and learn from schools succeeding with similar populations. *A school that makes AYP, but earns 30-0 points will be a 2 star school. AYP Watch points, 4 stars points, 3 stars points, 2 stars 30-0 points, 1 star AYP points, 5 stars points, 4 stars points, 3 stars points, 2 stars 30-0 points, *1 star No points, 3 stars points, 2 stars 30-0 points, 1 star

15 Other Schools  A School Performance Framework for high schools is currently in development.  A School Performance Framework for alternative and special education schools is currently in development.

16 Uses  Schools that earn 5 stars will be an Autonomous School.  Schools that earn 1 star will receive differentiated supports.  Schools will attend School Improvement Planning professional development in order that SPF results can be used to increase achievement for all students.  The main purpose of the SPF is for schools to learn who is earning uncommon results with similar student populations in order to learn from one another and increase achievement of all students.

17 Conclusion  The School Performance Framework will help ensure all students in the Clark County School District are Ready By Exit.  Q&A


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