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Marathon Training Dont Hit the Wall: Nutrition 101 for the Marathon Review Date 2/11 G-1292 Provided Courtesy of RD411.com Where health care professionals.

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Presentation on theme: "Marathon Training Dont Hit the Wall: Nutrition 101 for the Marathon Review Date 2/11 G-1292 Provided Courtesy of RD411.com Where health care professionals."— Presentation transcript:

1 Marathon Training Dont Hit the Wall: Nutrition 101 for the Marathon Review Date 2/11 G-1292 Provided Courtesy of RD411.com Where health care professionals go for information

2 Carbohydrate: A Runners Friend Spares muscle glycogen: –Not all created equal –Simple vs complex Enriched vs whole grain Inadequate carbohydrate intake can lead to: –Protein/muscle breakdown –Decreased ability to burn body fat Consume carbohydrate before, during, and after long runs

3 Protein: Why Do We Need It? Immune function Hormone production Repair damaged muscle tissue (foot strike) To optimize carbohydrate storage in muscles, eat carbohydrate and protein after long runs Protein helps stabilize blood sugar levels, when consumed with a carbohydrate meal/snack Gibala MJ. Protein nutrition and endurance exercise: what does science say. Available at: Accessed February 24,

4 Fat: Friend of Foe? Fat not used for energy is easily stored as body fat The body has unlimited storage capacity for fat: –A 150-pound lean athlete may have 60,000 calories of stored fat

5 Fat: Friend of Foe? (contd) During exercise, trained vs untrained people and women vs men burn more fat calories Some fat in the diet is necessary to absorb some nutrients, vitamins, and antioxidants (carotenoids)

6 Choose Healthy Fats Choose these: Avocadoes Canola oil Fatty fishsalmon Flaxseeds Natural nut butters Nuts and seeds Olives Olive oil Avoid these: Saturated fat High-fat animal and dairy products Coconut oil Palm and palm kernel oil Trans fatspartially hydrogenated oils

7 Get That Fluid on Board! Dehydration can start quickly, especially when an athlete is perspiring heavily Even a 2%–3% fluid loss impairs performance Goal of hydration is to prevent this from occurring Rodriguez NR, DiMarco NM, Langley S; American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, American College of Sports Medicine. Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: nutrition and athletic performance. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109;

8 Signs of Dehydration Thirst, dry mouth Weakness, fatigue Nausea, vomiting High body temperature Muscle crampslegs Dizziness, confusion Weak, rapid heart rate Lack of coordination and judgment Horswill CA. Signs of dehydration. Gatorade Sports Science Institute, Sports Science Library: signs of dehydration. Available at: Accessed February 23, 2011.www.gssiweb.com/Article_Detail.aspx?articleid=428

9 Hydrate Morning, Noon, and Night Plain water is OK for less than 60 minutes of exercise You may need sports beverages (fluid, carbohydrate, and sodium) for more than 60 minutes of exercise You need to carry fluid with you at all times! Rodriguez NR, DiMarco NM, Langley S; American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, American College of Sports Medicine. Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: nutrition and athletic performance. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109;

10 Hydrate Morning, Noon, and Night (contd) Before and during the run or race: –Drink 5-7 mL/kg body weight at least 4 hours before the run –Know that individual fluid needs during a run will vary, depending on body weight and environmental conditions –Drink at least 16–24 fl oz (2–3 C) of fluid/pound lost –Drink until urine is pale or clear C=cup, fl oz=fluid ounce, kg=kilogram, mL=milliliter Rodriguez NR, DiMarco NM, Langley S; American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, American College of Sports Medicine. Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: nutrition and athletic performance. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109;

11 Daily Eating, Daily Fuel Eat regularly, every 3–4 hours Have balanced mealsgrain/starch, protein, fruit/vegetable, healthy fat Choose whole grains vs white-enriched grains Fuel your body with nourishing food Experiment during training Do not try something new on race day

12 The Last Meal: Meal Before the Marathon High carbohydrate (200–300 g) will help spare muscle glycogen Easily digestible, low in fat and fiber Size of meal depends on time before start Intake is individualized to meet the needs of each runner g=gram Rodriguez NR, DiMarco NM, Langley S; American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, American College of Sports Medicine. Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: nutrition and athletic performance. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109;

13 What About Carbohydrate Loading? Carbohydrate loadinga technique used to load the muscles up with glycogen, which historically involved more drastic measures Try a modified approach: –Taper or reduce run-training during the week preceding the race –Continue daily carbohydrate-rich food intake during the week preceding the marathon –Consume carbohydrate-rich foods and/or beverages during the marathon

14 Fuel Up During the Marathon Extend endurance performance through carbohydrate consumption during long events (more than 60 minutes) Choose carbohydrates that are easily digested and well tolerated, trying foods during training to determine the best sources Use sports beverages containing water, sugar (7%), sodium, and potassium Rodriguez NR, DiMarco NM, Langley S; American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, American College of Sports Medicine. Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: nutrition and athletic performance. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109;

15 Fuel Up During the Marathon (contd) Use energy gels or energy bars Avoid fructose as the first ingredient, because it is ineffective and may cause diarrhea Rodriguez NR, DiMarco NM, Langley S; American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, American College of Sports Medicine. Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: nutrition and athletic performance. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109;

16 Recovery Meals Consume carbohydrates within 30 minutes after completion of a marathon Eat carbohydrates at 2-hour intervals up to 6 hours post-event Choose carbohydrates with a high glycemic index for maximal muscle glycogen synthesis Drink until urine is pale or clear Rodriguez NR, DiMarco NM, Langley S; American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, American College of Sports Medicine. Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: nutrition and athletic performance. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109;

17 Vitamins and Minerals Athletes who are at risk for inadequate intake of vitamins and minerals are those who: –Restrict energy intake or use severe weight loss practices –Eliminate one or more food groups from the diet –Consume high-carb, low-nutrient-dense foods Rodriguez NR, DiMarco NM, Langley S; American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, American College of Sports Medicine. Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: nutrition and athletic performance. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109;

18 Vitamins and Minerals (contd) Women are more likely to lack calcium, iron, and zinc Some vitamins and minerals compete with each other for absorption, so mega doses are not recommended As an insurance policy, consider taking a daily multivitamin/mineral, plus extra calcium for women Rodriguez NR, DiMarco NM, Langley S; American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, American College of Sports Medicine. Position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine: nutrition and athletic performance. J Am Diet Assoc. 2009;109;

19 Weight Loss Success Regular physical activity Moderate reductions in calorie intake, rather than severe diets Healthy eating patterns and behaviors Records of food intake, physical activity, and goals Mentally ready and committed

20 Keep the Fire Burning! Eat often, every 3–4 hours Consume enough to support life Stay physically active most days of the week (run/walk) Pump some iron to help build muscle

21 You Can Do It! Is your mental tape supportive and friendly?


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