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STEPPING STONES TO USING DATA

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Presentation on theme: "STEPPING STONES TO USING DATA"— Presentation transcript:

1 STEPPING STONES TO USING DATA
STAR Early Literacy & Measures of Academic NHA Using Assessment Data to Drive Instruction

2 Challenging Our Students to Reach their Highest Potential
How can we accomplish this? By using assessments that help guide instruction. The whole purpose of giving an assessment is to receive data that you can use to make a difference for the students in your class. Teachers who can read and interpret their reports are better prepared to use the data to influence instruction, create flexible groupings, and adjust time spent on certain topics. Better Data = Better Learning!

3 Intended Accomplishments
Overview of MAP and STAR EL Testing MAP and STAR Reports Analyze and Use Data on Reports Student Goal Setting The purpose of this workshop is to help you understand and be able to use the data provided on the NWEA and STAR EL reports. You will get an overview of testing We’ll look at MAP & STAR reports and get an understanding of them You’ll analyze and use the data on your reports to identify areas of strengths and areas of concern And lastly, I want you to leave the workshop today with a plan for using what you learn. Data is of little value unless you USE it. So you will have time to do some goal planning for your class and for your individual students. Walk participants through the packet of materials provided.

4 Testing Windows Fall (Goals/Survey test -1 hour/subject area)
MAP testing for grades 2-8 is done during three main test windows: Fall (Goals/Survey test -1 hour/subject area) Winter (Goals/Survey test) Spring (Goals/Survey test) Optional-Summer (Survey test for placement or Goals/Survey after summer school program) Only fall and spring test data will be used for gain analysis (to determine student growth). Data from each test window should be used to track progress throughout the year. STAR testing is done within the MAP test windows and may also be done once a month, if desired.

5 Computer Adaptive Testing
You will pinpoint your student’s specific achievement level with greater accuracy. This can be accomplished because… …the difficulty of test questions are automatically adjusted to the instructional level and abilities of the student, based on their answers. After last Click: As a student tests, the program automatically moves up or down the scale to select questions based on the student’s previous answer. If the student answers correctly, the next question will be more difficult; if he/she answers incorrectly, the next question will be easier. The test basically builds a relationship with the student, honing in on the instructional level they are at.

6 Triangulation Three supporting pieces that agree
Never use only one piece of data to make important decisions! Local & State Assessments Before we begin working with data we must remember never to use only one piece of data when making important instructional decisions. It may be a bad test day, a student may feel ill, a student may not take the test seriously and are just clicking buttons, etc. Because of these reasons results won’t always be accurate. That is why you must also look at other assessments to make your instructional decisions. Teacher (Classroom Assessment) MAP/STAR Data

7 STAR Early Literacy Data Analysis
We will begin today’s analysis with STAR EL and then we will move on to MAP

8 Who Should Take STAR Early Literacy?
Any student who is not yet an independent reader. (has <100-word vocabulary) Primarily pre-kindergarten through first-grade students. Second-language learners Special Ed students (Special Ed students w/IEP): The IEP takes precedence in how the testing is done. You should confer with your test proctor early on, and let them know if there should be any special accommodations for any of your students so the test proctor can make the special arrangements. Also, IEP Goals may be revised after STAR data analysis, if necessary. The key to successful instructional planning is accurate and timely assessment!

9 STAR EL Terms & Domains 7 Domains 41 Underlying Skills
General Readiness Graphophonemic Knowledge Phonemic Awareness Phonics Structural Analysis Vocabulary Comprehension 41 Underlying Skills Refer to document: STAR EL Literacy Skill Definitions (page ) There are 7 domain areas assessed in STAR EL: GR, GK, PA, P, SA, V and C Within these areas there are 41 underlying skills assessed. Correlation between STAR and Scope & Sequence of Open Court State Aligned

10 Refer to document: What the Scores Mean (page )
STAR EL Reports Refer to document: What the Scores Mean (page ) Teachers can Generate Reports from their Desktop *Score Distribution Report: Provides a table showing the skills score distribution of a group of students for each of the domains. Shows strengths and areas of concern. *Summary Report: Summarizes the test results over time for the students you’ve selected. *Growth Report: Shows the test results for the group of students you’ve selected and measures their progress between two testing sessions. *Diagnostic Report: Provides an individual skills assessment, etc. and may help to determine how to improve your student’s performance. *Parent Report: Information letter for parents or guardians that provides up-to-date information about their child’s progress in attaining early literacy skills. After students tests, there are several reports that you will want to become familiar with. (ask LTS/TF for assistance in accessing your reports) The most useful reports are denoted with an asterisk. (Click on links to discuss) Other reports may be investigated for their usefulness. After evaluating the data on the reports, instruction can then be targeted.

11 Look for different skills depending on the time of year.
25-49% of the time, the student achieved this skill, etc. Results show class strengths and weaknesses If you haven’t taught the skill, the skill score will probably be low. Don’t worry-be happy! Look for different skills depending on the time of year. Each domain includes between three and twelve skills Note: 2nd part of Score Distr. Report is on the next slide, if needed. (“Look for different skills…”) Skills acquired in the spring will not necessarily show up as a skill acquired in the fall. Skills acquired in the fall hopefully will also show up as being acquired in the spring. **NOTE: you may want to have teachers wait on the activity until the MAP teachers begin theirs. Return

12 Summary Reports are used if a student has only tested once
Summary Reports are used if a student has only tested once. If they have tested more than once, the Growth Report should be used. Return to Understanding Reports

13 Shows progress for individual students
Return Shows progress for individual students (Literacy Dom Scores) Represent the percentage of items a student would be expected to answer correctly within a domain. They range from and represent a student’s proficiency in each of the 7 domain areas. Literacy Domain Scores Shows skill progress for the entire class

14 Provides information on one student
Scaled Score Identifies whether the student is an emergent reader, transitional reader or probable reader Shows skills for which student may need additional instruction Scaled Score: The actual score that a student received on the assessment. It is calculated based on both the difficulty of the questions and the number of correct responses. Scaled Scores range from and are associated with stages of literacy development: Emergent reader, Transitional reader and Probable reader. Emergent Reader: Scaled score Students are beginning to understand that printed text has meaning. They are learning that print flows from left to right and from the top to the bottom of the page. Can identify most letters of alphabet and can match most letters to their sounds. Vocabulary, listening skills and understandings of print are being built. Transitional Reader: Scaled Score Students have mastered their alphabet skills and letter-sound relationships. They can identify many beginning and ending consonant sounds and long and short vowel sounds. They may be able to blend sounds and word parts to read simple words. Probable Reader: Scaled Score Students are becoming proficient After evaluating this information, instruction can now be targeted. Ideal Spring goal for a Young 5 student: Emergent reader with a scaled score of 465 Ideal Spring goal for Kindergarten student: Transitional reader with scaled score of at least 675 Ideal Spring goal for a First Grade student: Probable reader with a scaled score of at least 775 Return

15 Become familiar with this report if you will be using it at parent/teacher conferences.

16 Recommendations for Analyzing STAR Early Literacy Reports
1. Analyze the Summary and/or Growth Reports first. Review what the scaled score refers to and identify the scaled score for each student. Determine: Emergent reader (novice): (If young 5’s test, ideal Spring goal would be at least 300) Transitional reader (basic): (Ideal Spring goal for Kindergarten students would be at least 675) Probable reader (proficient): >775 (Ideal Spring goal for First grade students would be at least 775) 2. Using the Distribution Statistics Chart and two different colored highlighters, determine the percentile rankings of each student in each literacy domain area. On your reports, highlight the percentile in each literacy domain, indicating where a student is below grade level. (use most recent test event) Using the other colored highlighter, highlight the percentile in each literacy domain, indicating where a student is above grade level. 3. Using the Diagnostic Report and the Class Breakdown by Skill Score Charts, group students according to their strengths and areas of concern. Refer to your Growth Report activity information and note on the Class Breakdown Chart which students are below and above grade level. After a student tests, you may ask yourself, what’s next? Follow steps 1-3 and you should be able to get a better idea of where your student is performing instructionally. We will go over this in more detail in just a moment. (show teachers the analysis materials they will use) Bullet #3: Using the Diagnostic Report and the Class Breakdown by Skill Score Charts, group students according to their strengths and areas of concern: Use one Class Breakdown by Skill Score chart for each domain. Put each student’s initials in the appropriate box to identify which instructional group they belong in. Example: Phonics chart-If a student scored between in the skill score of “Replacing Vowels,” put their initials in the box labeled “Replacing Vowels 25-49, etc. Keep in mind that if a student was not taught the skill, their score will probably be low. After completing the worksheets, you will have students grouped based on their achievement levels in the specific skill areas. This will make it easier to differentiate instruction-(don’t forget Triangulation). If students have a skill score of 49 or less, you will need to remediate. If they have a skill score of 75 or greater, you should offer more challenging materials. The next step will be to find appropriate instructional materials to address individual or group needs.

17 Other Resources Power Lessons Get Principal approval
Must purchase from Renaissance Learning After you disaggregate or analyze the data, you will need to address the specific needs of your students. Power lessons are an option and are an effective way to balance instruction and practice. They are short and flexible, and they can be used to teach nearly every skill. You may also team up with other grade level teachers to design lessons to address specific needs and then share your lessons. In doing this, you will be spreading the workload.

18 Click for Goal-Setting Activity:
“Using STAR EL Assessments to Guide Instruction” Give K-1 teacher their assignment. They may leave or stay for the rest of the presentation. Assignment must be turned in to Principal. Assignment: Analyze the Summary and/or Growth Reports first. Determine: Emergent reader (novice): Transitional reader (basic): Probable reader (proficient): >775 2. Using the Distribution Statistics Chart and two different colored highlighters, determine the percentile rankings of each student in each literacy domain area. On your reports, highlight the percentile in each literacy domain, indicating where a student is below grade level. (use most recent test event) Using the other colored highlighter, highlight the percentile in each literacy domain, indicating where a student is above grade level. 3. Using the Diagnostic Report and the Class Breakdown by Skill Score Charts, group students according to their strengths and areas of concern. Refer to your Growth Report activity information and note on the Class Breakdown Chart which students are below and above grade level.

19 MAP Data Analysis We will now begin the MAP portion of this data analysis workshop

20 Key Words and Concepts RIT DesCartes Goal Performance MAP Mean Median
Norms Data based on performance of students from a wide variety of schools and school districts The middle score received by a group of students; half of the scores are above, half are below this score The arithmetic average Measures of Academic Progress (the computer adaptive test) An academic roadmap. Indicates how students performed in various goal areas of the test (state standards) A resource listing skills/concepts, based on RIT ranges to help design instruction Student’s instructional level score (Rausch Unit) These are some of the key words and concepts used in this MAP workshop. (quickly review each one)

21 Think about… What planning has to take place?
How do I own this data and make it work for me and my students? How do I help others understand and use this data? What resources will I need to get the job done? As we go through the workshop today, I would like you to keep these “think abouts” in mind, and try to come up with ideas that will help you along the way.

22 Instructional Level The MAP test is not a test for determining mastery of skills. It provides a road map for students toward achieving mastery. The MAP test provides the instructional level of the student through the RIT score, which can then be translated into skills and concepts that the student already knows and/or should be taught.

23 MAP’s RIT (Rasch Unit) Scale
RIT = Achievement/ Instructional level score Used to show growth over time Numbers on the RIT scale relate directly to the difficulty of items on the test to provide a more accurate assessment Score has the same meaning regardless of the students’ grade level or items taken Adult Reading MAP Test 250 x x - - - - + + + + x + 215 x + x 5th Grade x x x + x x x x x x x The RIT is the one of the most important pieces of information on a student. It is the actual instructional level the student is at. It is used to show a student’s growth history from year to year. (After 3rd bullet): So the RIT is a unit of measure that uses individual test question item difficulty values to estimate student achievement. (After Bullet 4): Example: In Reading, a RIT of 215 for a 3rd, 5th and 8th grade student means they are demonstrating the same academic achievement. (In this case, that is typically a 7th grade reading level.) The light yellow rectangle represents curriculum content. High-achieving outliers (top red “X”) are at 99%ile but you don’t know how far above they are when using conventional tests. With the MAP, you can find out more precisely where your high-end or low-end student’s are so you can differentiate more appropriately. The software determines their level by, over the course of the test, responding to incorrect and correct answers that hones in on the student’s instructional level. (Explain the + and _ on illustration) 150 Beginning Literacy

24 Let’s Get Familiar with MAP Reports!

25 MAP Reports Access Online:
MAP Reports are available hours after testing is complete, provided data uploads to NWEA are successful. Access Online: Teacher Report Class Roster Report (Individual Student Progress) Class by RIT Report Must Order: (Principal has instructions how to order) Class Report (Alpha & RIT) Grade Report (Alpha & RIT) Individual Student Progress Report (Parent Report) Achievement Status Growth Report (ASG) MAP reports are available 24-48… This means that if your students test on a Monday, you can access and print your online reports on Tuesday. You can begin using the data right away-no waiting around. There are many reports available but the most valuable reports will probably be the Teacher, Class by RIT, Parent and ASG reports. We are presently working on customized reports for teachers that combine various bits of info from several reports. (Review types of reports that are available and where to find them.)

26 Accessing NWEA Reports Website
BondyBondy ****** Go to https://reports.nwea.org Primary Teachers receive their user name and password from Principal (Principal receives from MAP Coordinator) Go to https://reports.nwea.org to access teacher reports. (CLICK) User name and password will be sent to MAP Coordinator, who in turn has to distribute teacher user names and passwords to the principals, who will distribute to teachers whose names were in the Class Roster File sent to NWEA. Teachers can access online reports within hours of the data being uploaded to NWEA. Let’s walk through the steps for accessing your reports…

27 Accessing MAP “Teacher” Reports
This is the entry page you will see when you login. Notice the menu on the left hand side of the screen. The first menu item under Online Reports is Teacher Reports. Note also that you must have Adobe Acrobat installed on your computer. This software is free from Adobe and there is a link on the left hand side to easily download it if you don’t already have it.

28 Accessing MAP “Teacher” Reports
You will be prompted to select the season, or term, for which you want to see your report. After selecting the term, click the “submit” button to launch the report in Adobe Acrobat.

29 Click for Goal Score Translation Chart
Sample Teacher Report Teacher report specifics: SUBJECT AREA - What subject area are we working with? (Have them identify this from sample report.) STUDENT ID NUMBER—Purpose is to track kids’ data; no scores are associated with name, how many John Smith’s do you know? Must stay unique to that student the entire time they are in that system. If you change the number when you move from elementary to middle, you will lose the data. You must understand, you cannot change the ID number for a child. STUDENT’S NAME AND GRADE– What grade is this report for? TEST FORM (ALT) TEST TYPE (MAP) Test Type—This column indicates the type of test your students took. S/G means Goals Survey Test – This is the most common MAP version used. It provides not only a RIT, but also information about each goal strand area. SUR means Survey Test. This is a shorter version, about 20 questions, that only provides a RIT score – no goal information. Any valid score you see is put in your summary data. If a score is not valid, it won’t be printed. All of the information for special codes goes into a file that accompanies the Class Roster File (CRF), called a Special Programs File (SPF) prior to each season’s testing. The district has control over certain codes. Some are already preset. The people in your district need to be clear on what the exemptions mean when using the codes for the SPF. MEAN - The mean RIT is the average overall RIT of the group on this report. It is determined by adding the RIT scores of every student in the class and dividing by the number of students. MEDIAN - The median is the RIT score in the middle of the class. That is, the same number of students score above this score as below. STANDARD DEVIATION - The standard deviation of the class indicates the diversity of the instructional levels of this group of students. A very simplified definition might be, “the average of the differences from the mean”. The higher the standard deviation, the more varied the instructional levels of the students. We will discuss this in more detail later in the workshop. STANDARD ERROR - This is the range of error, or confidence band, around a score and is used to determine the RIT range and percentile range. RIT RANGE - The RIT Range indicates the range of error or confidence band around a score. A score is NEVER just one number. We have this on the report to use when you are making decisions around any cut scores. You should always look at the score range to make the determination of whether the student makes the cut or not. Students’ performing within the same score range have similar instructional levels. This is the confidence band around the student’s score. If the student took the same test three days in a row, he or she would most probably score within that band. Kind of like a digital scale, you step on and off and get different scores, but they are all around the same range. The range is a total of one standard error. PERCENTILE - Percentile is a score based on a comparison of all of the students in the norming study – 1.05 million students from 323 school districts in 24 states who were administered Achievement Level Tests and Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) tests. As far as we know, this is the largest norming study in the country. Only valid scores are included in this study. Percentile has nothing to do with percent of correct answers (percentage) a student gets on a test. A student with a percentile of 35, for example, means that on this test, this student surpassed 35 percent of the students in the norming study. It also means that 65 percent of the students in the study exceeded this score. PERCENTILE RANGE - Just like the RIT range, the percentile range indicates the confidence band around the percentile score. GOAL PERFORMANCE - These scores indicate how students performed in each of the goal areas listed. Click for Goal Score Translation Chart Return

30 Accessing “Class Roster” Reports
(AKA Individual Student Progress Reports) Now let’s look at a different report that is available to teachers – the Class Roster report. It is the second menu item in the list. You will be prompted to select the term and select your class. If you teach multiple periods and they have created your student data file correctly, you should see all of your periods listed in the drop down box. After making your selection, click the “Submit” button.

31 Accessing “Class Roster” Student Information
A screen similar to this will appear. If you click on a student ID, you will see a student’s historical data listed. Let me show you an example of one. For this example, we’ll look at Melanie’s ID. Click Here for Student Information

32 “Class Roster” Student Information
The student’s historical data shows personal information for a student, the class history as loaded in your district’s student data files across time, and every test event for a student.

33 Accessing “Class Roster” Student Progress Reports
To access the Individual Student Progress reports, we will go back to the Class Roster Student List page. First note that step 3 above allows you to select the period for which you want to see growth calculated on these student reports. By clicking on a student’s name, you will see the Individual Student Progress report for that individual. Click on student name for Progress Report

34 On-line Indiv. Student Progress Report p. 10
Class Roster: Individual Student Progress Report Here is a sample of the whole report. You will notice at the top of the report that growth will be calculated from fall to spring. (CLICK) Here is a close-up of the mathematics goal area. Notice the student growth calculation in RIT points. Return On-line Indiv. Student Progress Report p. 10

35 Class by RIT: Class Breakdown by Subject
Click on subject area name to see the class breakdown by goal area This layout shows the Class Breakdown by overall RIT for a specific class. The number of parenthesis indicates the student's overall RIT in those subject areas. By clicking on the subject name – Mathematics, Reading, or Language Usage, you will see the Class Breakdown by Goal report.

36 Class by RIT: Class Breakdown by Goal
Click on student’s name to see DesCartes skills and concepts associated with RIT range Or click on <all students in cell> to see DesCartes skills associated with the students in that RIT range We will look at this report in more detail later. Or click on a goal name to see DesCartes skills for the entire RIT range in that goal for the class Return

37 The Class Report must be ordered on the NWEA website
The Class Report must be ordered on the NWEA website. It is exactly like a Teacher Report except it has the RIT ranges in the goal areas. Return

38 Grade Report must be ordered

39 Return

40 (AKA Parent Report) Return Sample Report p. 9
This report is the one recommended to use at Parent/Teacher Conf. or to send home to parents. Return Sample Report p. 9

41 Achievement Status & Growth Report
This report lists students alphabetically by class. The report provides each student’s fall-to-spring growth and shows how that growth relates to the student’s fall growth targets based on RIT Block Growth Norms. This report can be ordered after fall testing and after spring testing. Note that this is a fall report. Spring reports will include student’s: Spring RIT/Std. Error Fall to Spring Growth (student’s actual growth) Whether or not the student met the target (based on RIT Block Growth Norms) The growth target Index a negative number if the actual growth was below the RIT Block Growth-based target a positive number if the actual growth was above the RIT Block Growth-based target Achievement Status & Growth Targets Class Report p.

42 A Closer Look: Teacher Report
I want to make sure you are familiar with the layout of your Teacher report so let’s take a look at it. (Review ID, Name, Grade, Test Type, Test Date) By monitoring the standard error on your reports, you may determine a problem with the test, that may reduce the validity of the scores. The standard error relates to the error of the test, not the student, so if a student is not doing their personal best, this won't necessarily be reflected in the standard error. The standard error takes into consideration: The difficulty of items, The number of items, The number of items answered correctly and incorrectly A normal standard error for the longer version Goals/Survey test is 3.5. Anything higher than that may indicate that the scores are not as valid. A normal standard error for the shorter version Survey test is 4.5. Anything higher than that may indicate that the scores are not as valid. Let me give you one perspective with the following example: If 5 out of 10 questions on the test were answered correctly vs 3 out of 10 answered correctly. If the items that were answered correctly in the 5 correct, were easy questions, but the 3 items answered correctly in the other were difficult questions, the computer would take this into consideration with its standard error calculations. In this case, the RIT would be lower with the 3 items that were answered correctly, but the standard error might be higher since answering more difficult questions could relate to more validity (the student knows their stuff). This is a simplified version of how standard error is calculated. The bottom line is that standard error is all done with fancy math taking into consideration the above variables.

43 RIT vs Percentile: Teacher Report
RIT: Grade level independent Percentile: Grade level dependent (NWEA norm) What is a RIT? =Instructional level of the student. RIT Range=score ranges indicate the range of error, or the confidence band around a score. It is very important to remember that no score is absolute. We would expect that if a student took this same test again, within a short period of time, they would most probably score within this range. What is a Percentile? = A ranking of students in the same grade level who took the same test. If a student scored at the 95th %ile, 5% of students scored better than that student, but that student scored better than 95% of all students that took the test. The percentile is based on a norming group that took the test. NWEA’s is based on about 1,050,000 students (2002). Over 3 million in 2005. Percentile Range is a confidence band similar to the RIT range. If the student took the test again in a short period of time, there would most probably score in the percentile range. Here’s a quick visual of how RIT and %ile are compared. Look at Alexander and Christofer. Both have RITs of 210, yet their %iles are different. Note the grades that these students are in. The 5th grader is at the 53rd %ile, with a RIT of 210 for his grade and the the 6th grader is at the 35%ile, with a RIT of 210 for his grade. The 5th grader is basically at grade level.

44 Are there expected RIT and growth scores?
typical Do you think there are expected RIT & growth scores? (click) NO, only typical. (Click)

45 Monitoring Growth in Student Achievement
Mathematics Achievement and Growth Please turn to the ”Monitoring Growth in Student Achievement” on page _________ Based on the 2002 NWEA norming study, there are “typical” RITs per grade level. We can’t expect students to be at a particular RIT but we must strive to get them to the “typical” and/or above. (NWEA updates the norming data every 3 years-next norming study will be in 2005 so new charts should be available ) We can use the grade-level norms, shown on the Monitoring Growth in Student Achievement chart, to help us with what is “typical”; that is, students scoring at the 50th percentile in the norming study. What would be the typical median RIT for a 4th grade student in the fall? 201. What about the spring? 209 And that would translate to a typical growth of 8.9 RIT points. (Keep in mind that “growth” is not obtained simply by subtracting the Fall RIT from the Spring RIT or the Fall RIT from the previous Fall RIT.) What do you notice in this growth column here? (click) Younger students typically can achieve more growth than older students. Have you any thoughts on why? in the early years we are teaching students to learn to read; in the upper grades we teach them to read to learn. There are more difficult, higher level thinking skills that come into play when we read to learn and growth is typically slower. Monitoring Growth in Student Achievement Chart

46 Monitoring Growth in Student Achievement p.
RIT Block Growth Norms 11.3 5.4 The Monitoring Growth Chart is a great reference when students come into a grade at the “typical” RIT. But we all know students are coming into our grades at all different instructional levels. From norming studies we know that low-performing students and high-performing students usually don’t grow at the same rate. Because of this, we can use the RIT Block Growth Norms chart to indicate how students “typically” grow per grade level. (CLICK) For example, our norming study tells us that students performing between RITs in the fall, typically show a fall-to-spring growth of 11.3 RITs, while students performing between RITs (CLICK) in the fall, typically show a fall-to-spring growth of 5.4 RITs. Knowing this, we can set realistic goals for our students. RIT Block Growth Norms p. Monitoring Growth in Student Achievement p.

47 Placement Guidelines A RIT is only one piece of the puzzle for making important decisions. We also have “Placement Guidelines” that may be used when making placement recommendations. Please remember they are only guidelines Placement Guidelines p.

48 Summary Goal Information
Goal Performance Areas correlate to State topics Summary Totals in the Goal Performance Areas Let’s go back and continue looking at the Teacher report layout (click) On the report you have the Goal Performance Areas that correlate to State topics. The wording may be a little different but they are aligned. The summary data can be found at the bottom of each report. (click) It gives the overall information for the class or grade you are working with. The summary data indicates the number of students who took the test; Mean RIT, Std Dev. which gives you a quick snapshot if you should instruct whole group or small groups. (Std dev. of <10=more large group instruction would be appropriate; greater than 11 would indicated smaller group instruction is appropriate to meet the needs of the students) and median RIT. It also gives you a breakdown of students into groups – Hi, Av, Lo. Based on how they scored in the GPA’s: How many students scored HI in # sense? 25 students How many scored AVG in computation? 15 scored “AVG” in computation How many scored LO in geometry? 8 scored “low” in geometry. What is the median for this group of students? (217) Where are they in relation to grade level? (Look at the Monitoring Growth chart-at a 6th grade level) Sample Math Teacher Report p.

49 Sample Math Teacher Report p.
Scavenger Hunt Which student has the highest score? Which student has the lowest score? Which student has the median score? Which goal area has the highest mean? Which goal has the lowest standard deviation? Katlynne Kirsten Nasser Number Sense To get you a little more comfortable with the Teacher Report layout, I’d like you to do a scavenger hunt. Use the Teacher Report found on page _____ and answer the following questions. Algebraic Fxn Sample Math Teacher Report p.

50 Let’s Work with the Sample Data

51 USE Sample Math Teacher Report p.
Fall 2003 NWEA Sample District Nixon Elementary Bondy, Bondy 6 55 Bondy6th Grade 6 Math 234 202 216 217 Patrick Robert I’d like you to work on this Teacher Report Snapshot. It will give you an idea of certain things you should be looking for when you get your Teacher Report. Step 1: Find the 3rd highest performing student in the class. Record their score and name in the first box under Step 1 (A). Now find the 3rd lowest performing student in the class. Record their score and name in the second box under Step 1 (B). In the third box record the grade level median from your Monitoring Growth Chart (C). Now find the class median from your report and record it in the fourth box (D). STEP 2 - Finding the current range of performance in this class. In Step 2, record and compare the 3rd highest performing student (A) – who represents the upper end of the class – to the grade level median (C). In this case the upper end of the class is performing near that of a typical (10th) grade class. Now record and compare the 3rd lowest performing student (B) – who represents the lower end of the calls – to the grade level median (C). In this case, the lower end of the class is performing near that of a typical (4th) grade class. 3. Do you know why we are taking the 3rd highest and 3rd lowest students as our boundary of the class? They represent the extremes of the class, and may be the outliers. By eliminating these extremes, we get a better representation of the middle of the class. 234 216 10th Patrick 202 216 4th Robert 4 10 Monitoring Growth Chart p. Materials p. USE Sample Math Teacher Report p.

52 This class is achieving similarly to a typical 6th grade class.
217 216 This class is achieving similarly to a typical 6th grade class. A difference of 3 or more RITs between the median of the class and the grade level median (from Monitoring Growth Chart) would be considered significant. Step 3: 1. The class is at grade level-3 points above or below is a standard statistical measure for significance. Again, it is important to stress that RIT scores not be equated to grade levels.

53 Now You Use Your Own Data!
Using your Teacher Report, complete the Teacher Snapshot report Blank Materials: Teacher Report Snapshot

54 (Last question at bottom) Given typical growth for this grade level, it will take approx. ___________ years for the low end of your class to achieve grade level? This question is not meant to scare or discourage you. It is very important to know what you’re dealing with in your class so you can be better prepared to deal with it. Given typical growth (using the Monitoring Growth chart) for this grade level, it will take approximately ________ years for the low end of your class to achieve grade level? Monitoring Growth Chart p.

55 Answer: Low-end RIT + Yearly Fall to Spring Mean Growth = Grade Level RIT Count the number of yearly Fall to Spring Mean Growth entries you added The number you added equals the number of years needed to achieve grade level

56 Let the Data Speak to You!
We Will Look for…. Academic Diversity Median (middle of the class) Outliers (high-end, low-end: they affect the mean) Areas of Strengths and Concern How Data Compares to “Typical” in Norm Group We have all looked at data before, but what do you need to key in on to make sense of it? Let the data speak to you. 1. You will want to look at the academic diversity within your class. How many instructional groups are you dealing with. 2. You will want to look at the central tendency: mean and median. The mean is the average of the class or grade and it actually isn’t very useful in what we will do today. We will be using the median to look at the “middle of the class.” This median is the ‘middle score’ ½ of the students scored above it and ½ score below it. 3. You will look for “outliers”. Those are the students who are at the extreme outer ends of the grade or class; very high-achieving students and very low-achieving. When you look at the RIT scores of a class, the outlier will be ‘different’ by about 5 or more points. These students can’t be forgotten. (A quick way to determine the status of any outliers and how they affect the overall grade level score is to compare the overall median to the mean. If you have a median of 214 and a mean of 211, this indicates that the average of the class is lower and those students are dragging the class down.) 4. You will also identify Goal Performance Area’s of strengths and concerns on a class and individual student level 5. Lastly, you will look at how the students are doing against a ‘national’ group of students. NWEA’s norming group is a million plus students 6. Any questions? 7. Let’s take a look at some data (pass out Class/Teacher or Grade level reports). (If using Grade Reports) Looking at data as a quality team is key in the improvement process so I’d like you all to work in groups of 3 and take one grade level of three subject areas: math, reading and language. -The great thing about working in teams is to share ideas, brainstorm, and split the workload.

57 Identify Academic Diversity
Breakdown by 10 point RIT bands 200 210 4 separate learning groups within the class. Identifying Academic Diversity: By doing this, you can get a visual of the different instructional level groups within a class or grade level. In a moment you will be determining how many instructional groups you have in your class. Here is an example of how to determine it: By drawing horizontal lines every 10-RIT points, you can see which students are ~ at the same instructional level. 220 230 240

58 Academic Diversity Class Snapshot
Click This provides a quick way to show the “curve” in your classroom, with most students in the middle of the class. This class is fairly representative of a bell curve. Blank Materials: Class Breakdown by Overall RIT Score p.

59 Now You Use Your Own Data!
Use Your Teacher Report

60 Identify Academic Diversity
Divide your report, by drawing lines at 10-RIT intervals. (highlighters work well) Start at the top of the report, with the first RIT score and draw a line across your paper. Add 10 to that RIT score and draw another line at that new number. Add 10 to that number and draw a line at the new number, etc. Example: draw line after 210, 220, 230, 240, etc. Example: draw line after 153, 163, 173, 183, etc. (Have teachers follow these steps) Use your own Teacher Report

61 Identify Academic Diversity
200 210 4 separate learning groups within the class. Identifying Academic Diversity: By doing this, you can get a visual of the different instructional level groups within a class or grade level. In a moment you will be determining how many instructional groups you have in your class. Here is an example of how to determine it: By drawing horizontal lines every 10-RIT points, you can see which students are ~ at the same instructional level. 220 230 240

62 Identify Relative Strengths and/or Areas of Concern
Next, let’s look at the class/grade in relation to the goal areas. You’re going to identify which goal area this class/grade is performing highest in. 2. How do you determine that? First you must compare these RITs to what the typical grade level is to determine where the grade is performing. In this case, typical grade level is about 217 (click) and the RITs highlighted in yellow indicate “strengths” the class has overall. A strength is determined if it is 3 or more points above the typical. 3. We can consider this class to be strong in these areas, however, this doesn’t mean that we should ignore them. Notice that 10 students are listed in the LO category in number sense, 12 in algeb fxn, etc. So some differentiated instruction is still necessary. 4. Which are areas of concern? (click- shown in pink, whereby the RIT is 3 or more points below typical. ) 5. This data is from a Teacher Report of a class. Based on this data, a Class Goal may be selected. What might be a good class goal to set for this class? (measurement) If there isn’t a lot of difference between RITS in a couple goal areas, and you’re having difficultly in selecting a goal, go with the one that has the most leverage on the students. What that means is, if I had to choose between Number Sense and Measurement, Number Sense has the most leverage because it impacts everything else you do in math. This is where you will get the most bang for your buck. 6. It is very important to share this goal with the class and with parents. 224 221 220 213 220 220 Look for a difference of 3 or more RIT Points

63 Now You Use Your Own Data!
Now, I would like you to determine the strengths and areas of concern on your class/grade report. You can highlight each with different colors. Tell me the areas of concern in 2nd grade, 3rd grade, etc. While you disaggregate data, you may observe that several grade levels are consistently scoring low in the same goal area. That should be a red flag for you to investigate further. Is there a hole in the curriculum? If this is identified, teachers must work together across grade levels to develop lessons that will reinforce these skills in each of their classes. Materials: Teacher Report

64 Class Breakdown of Goal Performance Areas?
Aaron J. A.(201) You have looked at your overall class’ performance and now we will drill down further and start identifying how individual students are doing. In order to identify individual student performance in the goal areas, you will need to look at a Class by RIT Report. This report is so valuable because now we can pinpoint student’s specific skills which will help in deciding what to differentiate. 3. Look at this Class by RIT breakdown by GPArea: You will see how important it is to use this report after every testing session. Aaron is a 6th grader who has an overall RIT of 201 in Reading. Where does his score fall in relation to typical grade level? 4th grade level. So, to identify specifically where he needs assistance, we look at where he stands in the goal areas: Word Rec= (what typical grade level is he at? 2nd-3rd grade level) Read Comp= (what typical grade level is he at? at grade level) Literary Resp= (what typical grade level is he at? 4-5th grade leve) 4. After the report is analyzed, you really need to ask the questions: Why do the results look the way they do? What do I need to do to address the specific needs of my students? How effective am I at teaching all students in the core subject areas?

65 Benefits to Using the Class by RIT Report
Teachers can… Understand academic diversity within a classroom Recognize academic diversity across subject areas Group students with similar instructional needs. Identify needs for individual learning plans. Easily access DesCartes: A Continuum of Learning

66 Class by RIT: Class Breakdown by Subject
Click on subject area name to see the class breakdown by goal area The Class by RIT report, accessed online at the NWEA reports website, comes in two sections: The first part is a class breakdown by subject area The second part is a class breakdown by Goal Perf Areas This layout shows the Class Breakdown by overall RIT for a specific class. The number in parenthesis indicates the student's overall RIT in those subject areas. Class goals can easily be determined by looking at this report. Refer to Classroom MAP Goal Setting form page________ Next, by clicking on the subject area name – Mathematics, Reading, or Language Usage, you will see the Class Breakdown by Goal report.

67 Class by RIT: Class Breakdown by Goal
Click on student’s name to see DesCartes skills and concepts associated with RIT range Or click on <all students in cell> to see DesCartes skills associated with the students in that RIT range Now we see where each student’s RIT falls in each goal perf area. If I draw a line showing where typical grade level is, it is easy to see which students are above and below grade level. Click, click, click Or click on a goal name to see DesCartes skills for the entire RIT range in that goal for the class

68 DesCartes/ previously known as the Learning Continuum
RIT scores can be linked to specific skills, concepts, vocabulary, signs and symbols a student needs to acquire continued growth Classified into 10 point RIT divisions I want to explain more about DesCartes. DesCartes is a tool for teachers that lists all the skills, concepts, vocab, signs and symbols associated with RITs. It is replacing what was earlier called the Learning Continuum. NWEA created it by looking at every valid question in the subject areas and determining where in the RIT range they were appearing and in what difficulty. NWEA then classified these items into 10-RIT divisions. DesCartes is not to be used as a curricula. Use it as a tool alongside state standards. .

69 Class by RIT: Access to DesCartes
This is a sample of class breakdown report in a goal area, for an individual student, with the corresponding DesCartes page attached. The Skills and Concepts to Develop (middle column) are those that a student scoring in this RIT range is ready to learn. (LC emerging skills) Questions assessing these skills could usually be answered correctly 50% of the time. The Skills and Concepts to Enhance (left hand column) may need continued reinforcement or support for the student to maintain. (LC secured skills) Questions assessing these skills could usually be answered correctly 75% of the time. The Skills and Concepts to Introduce (right hand column) are those that a student can learn if a related task is presented in a more structured format. (LC future skills) Questions assessing these skills could usually be answered correctly 25% of the time.

70 Class by RIT Analysis & Planning
What you will need: Class by RIT Report DesCartes Student Goal Planning Sheet Take out your Class by RIT report that gives a breakdown of students within your class. You need to look at where your students are on these reports and set class goals as well as individual goals for each student. You can do this by using your Class by RIT report and your DesCartes. First, I would like you to draw a line on your report, separating the students that are below grade level from those that are at or above. This will help you when setting goals. You will complete one student goal planning sheet for every student. Fill out the form based on info requested: In the fall, fill in typical and actual scores When you get to area of focus, write down what you think would be a good goal. You may also want to confer with student on this goal. in fall and spring, you will need to use the ASG report for target growth and actual growth. Identify and set 1 goal/subject area for a particular student based on the area they are lowest in, or in the area they are low in that has the most leverage. Let teachers work on this for about 20 minutes

71 Goal Setting with Students
Set class and individual student goals Conference with each student to set goals Periodically review performance (5-10 minutes) with student Celebrate successes! Set goal for improvement (Ex. – Word Analysis) How would you do this? Set growth goal Make a Plan The teacher will ______ . The student will ______ . One way for students to become responsible for their own learning is to help them set their own goals based on these data, that they will work extra hard on this year. This is recommended for students in grades 3 and above. Encourage them to choose a goal that is an area of concern (obviously) and one that is not the class goal. You will want to meet with your students, individually, to discuss the one goal they think should be set. You may want to ask the student: In what areas of math do you especially like and do well? What are the skills you would like to improve? What can you do to be successful this school year in math? How can I support your successes? This process should help in promoting student ownership of their achievement. On the back of the Goal Planning Sheet, have the student fill in the Student Achievement Contract. Monitor progress periodically, at least after every testing session. After a goal is met, confer with student, celebrate and set another goal. Let them know they will be accountable for this throughout the year.

72 RIT Stick For measuring academic growth Student can fill out
Can travel in cumulative record folder An optional tool to help students keep track of their RIT score might be to use a “RIT Stick”. Explain that just the same way that you measure your growth by comparing your height to a yard stick, the student can record academic growth on a RIT stick from testing season to season. Discuss the issues of negative growth. Other ways negative growth might be explained: Academic inactivity during the summer Little, negative, or no growth might be more likely if this is a fairly high achieving student. (Information becomes much more specialized for higher performing students and oftentimes teachers don’t hold high expectations of these students because they already know they are doing well.) Other factors, such as emotional, social, and family issues all enter into how a child learns. One of the testing sessions may not have been accurately indicative of this student’s actual instructional level. (It might have been a bad testing day). Materials p.

73 Talking with Parents

74 Sharing Information with Parents
Spend no more than 5 minutes on test data Share class goal Share student’s goal Share ideas to help with goal/s at home 1.When parents come in for a minute conference, you won’t want to spend more than 5 minutes talking about the MAP test results. You might say, “We took a very important test recently, and I would like to show you your child’s achievement level in several subject areas. Here’s her individual student progress report (AKA Parent Report). Your daughter is performing at a very high level in reading for a 6th grader,” although she is a bit low in math. “This year’s goal in our class is Geometry and we will be working hard on this area.” Your child chose the area of Measurement as her individual goal for this year “Let me give you a couple of ideas for working with her at home.” If a student scored very low, this should be discussed with the parent as well. Don’t forget triangulation. Offer some reasons as to why the student didn’t test as well as the parent thought they should. Bad test day/Sick/Goofing around, etc. Explain that the MAP test is just one piece of assessment data you use to monitor their child’s progress. 2. You may want to ask parents to spend 10 minutes a night helping their child be successful. Give them some very concrete examples. For example: “Tell your child, I need to put dinner in at 5:07. It needs to cook for 45 minutes. What time will I need to take it out?” Simple, but effective. Think of some strategies like that that parents can do with little effort, just need the time commitment. 3. If parents want to know where other students are performing, show them the median norms from the norming chart or the District averages. (shown on Parent Report) You can use the median norms from the Monitoring Growth Chart, or show the NHA district averages, if you have them available. “Jessica performs about here.” If parents want percentiles, explain it to them. Be sure to explain the difference between RIT and percentile.

75 Checkpoint! What is the first thing to do with your Teacher Report?
What steps should you take when analyzing your Class by RIT report? Do you feel comfortable about how to set class/individual goal/s? How do you feel about goal-setting with students? How do you feel about talking to parents? How will you attempt to differentiate instruction? Questions/Comments? What is the first thing to do with your Teacher Report? Look for academic diversity and class median against the norm What steps should you take when analyzing your Class by RIT report? Set class goals based on how the students are grouped per subject area. Set individual goals based on how they are grouped in the GPA’s Do you feel comfortable about how to set class/individual goal/s? How do you feel about goal-setting with students? How do you feel about talking to parents? How will you attempt to differentiate instruction? Good Practice is to work as a team with grade level teachers. If you get remedial lessons for a particular goal, and another teacher gets lessons for another goal, you can share lessons. Don’t make more work for yourself than you have to. END Section 7

76 Think About We must all understand and take ownership of this data!
We must use this data to drive instruction! We must follow through on our action plans! Knowing your student’s learning style is key to differentiated learning. (add more here???????

77 RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO STAFF
“Teacher Testing Resource website for MAP & STAR EL”: Review the NHA Testing Administration Handbook “Teacher Chalkboard” (Online Communication) Need Help? Who Do You Call? Data Busters: Robert Theaker, Laura Stabler, Regina Gigowski Math Buster: Randy Creswell Reading Busters: Shelby Brownell, Sarah Huddleston, Mandy Lohman The NHA Handbook contains comprehensive info about testing. There is a section specifically for teachers. Teacher chalkboard includes monthly data tips.

78 Let’s build the bridge together so we can get to the other side where all students are challenged to realize their potential!

79 Help us Learn From You … Thank You!
Please complete the evaluation form. Thank You! Thank them for coming and for having you. Have them fill out evaluations for the workshop. END Section 8

80 END OF MAP DATA ANALYSIS


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