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Tuesday, 10 June 2014GCE Applied Science Unit 3: Energy & the Environment 3.6: Domestic Hot Water Systems Combination or 'combi' boilers This is the most.

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Presentation on theme: "Tuesday, 10 June 2014GCE Applied Science Unit 3: Energy & the Environment 3.6: Domestic Hot Water Systems Combination or 'combi' boilers This is the most."— Presentation transcript:

1 Tuesday, 10 June 2014GCE Applied Science Unit 3: Energy & the Environment 3.6: Domestic Hot Water Systems Combination or 'combi' boilers This is the most popular type of boiler in the UK, now found in around 70% of homes. Combi-boilers provide central heating and hot water without the need for a separate tank to store water; hence you can easily tuck them away under the stairs or in kitchen cabinets. Most suited to: Homes with one bathroom, households with single people, couples, families with one child. Usually available in following outputs: 24; 30; 35 kW Benefits: Instant, unlimited domestic hot water Compact, easy to fit if space is limited Disadvantages: Unable to run multiple showers or baths at the same time Lower flow rate for hot water than an open vent or system boiler

2 Tuesday, 10 June 2014GCE Applied Science System boilers A system boiler (sometimes known as a 'sealed system') provides central heating and hot water via a storage cylinder housed in an airing cupboard - no need for water tanks in the loft, as with an open vent boiler. Most suited to: Larger homes with multiple bathrooms/ensuites; families Usually available in following outputs:12; 15; 18; 24; 30; 38 kW Benefits: High flow rate for domestic hot water No tank(s) in your loft More than one hot tap / shower can easily operate at same time Disadvantages: Hot water is not instant. Once the water in the storage cylinder runs out you have to wait for it to reheat. You'll need to find space for the cylinder (usually an airing cupboard) Unit 3: Energy & the Environment 3.6: Domestic Hot Water Systems

3 Tuesday, 10 June 2014GCE Applied Science Open vent boilers Open vent boilers are a peculiarly British invention. An open vent (sometimes known as heating only) provide central heating and hot water via a boiler, a storage cylinder housed in the airing cupboard and water tanks in your loft. If you're looking to do a full system overhaul most people opt to remove the tanks from the loft and turn their open vent system into a sealed system. Most suited to: Larger homes with an existing open vent boiler Usually available in following outputs: 12; 15; 18; 24; 30; 38 kW Benefits: High flow rate for domestic hot water More than one hot tap / shower can easily operate at same time Disadvantages: Once the water in the storage cylinder runs out you have to wait for it to reheat. You'll need to find space for the cylinder (usually an airing cupboard) The bulk feed and expansion tanks are usually sited in the loft - this can create a problem if you're considering a loft conversion. Unit 3: Energy & the Environment 3.6: Domestic Hot Water Systems


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