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Addressing Climate Change Joseph Birt Specialist Support Officer – Building Control

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Presentation on theme: "Addressing Climate Change Joseph Birt Specialist Support Officer – Building Control"— Presentation transcript:

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2 Addressing Climate Change Joseph Birt Specialist Support Officer – Building Control

3 Developed countries are the lead contributors to greenhouse gas emissions and therefore to climate change. In Ireland, for example, we produce an average of 10 tons of greenhouse gas emissions per person per year making us one of the highest emitters globally. In Africa an average person will produce less than 0.1 tons. Climate change-related shifts in rainfall and drought patterns can have a devastating impact on small farmers in the worlds poorest regions, and it is predicted that rain-fed agriculture will drop significantly – deepening the food and water crises we face. Trocaire – the global context

4 Majuro Declaration on Climate Change 05 September 2013 – The Marshall Islands, Majuro. Signed by the leaders of 13 Pacific Island countries acutely vulnerable to rising sea levels, calling for urgent action to address climate change. The countries include Australia and New Zealand. Representatives from the UL, EU, USA and China attended. The responsibility of all to act, falls to every government, every company, every organization and every person with the capacity to do so, both individually and collectively, it says. Scientists warn, carbon dioxide levels need to peak this decade to avoid temperatures rising 2°C above pre industrial levels, which is considered to be a threshold of dangerous climate change. The UNs forthcoming IPCC climate science report is expected to warn that sea levels could rise between 29 and 82cm (11.4 to 32.3 inches) before 2100, levels which threaten the existence of some Pacific states.

5 How the climate might change: main findings Average UK summer temperature is likely to rise by 3 to 4°C by the 2080s In general, greater warming is expected in the southeast than the northwest of the UK, and there may be more warming in the summer and autumn than winter and spring Average summer rainfall across the UK may decrease by between 11% and 27% by the 2080s While this is the average, there will be a big change in rainfall between the seasons, with winters becoming wetter and summers drier. UK Climate Projections 2009

6 How the climate might change: main findings Average UK summer temperature is likely to rise by 3 to 4°C by the 2080s In general, greater warming is expected in the southeast than the northwest of the UK, and there may be more warming in the summer and autumn than winter and spring Average summer rainfall across the UK may decrease by between 11% and 27% by the 2080s While this is the average, there will be a big change in rainfall between the seasons, with winters becoming wetter and summers drier. Sea levels are expected to rise The mean sea level estimate for around the UK is a rise of 93 to 190 centimetres, but the top of the range is very unlikely to occur in the 21st century. Extreme weather events are likely to become more common For example, research published by the Met Office Hadley Centre suggests the 2003 heatwave could become a normal event by the 2040s. By the 2060s, such a summer would be considered cool according to some projections. UK Climate Projections 2009

7 The Government, and the country as a whole, face difficult choices. It is not possible to address all climate change risks. Decisions have to be taken on what and who should be protected from the impacts of climate change. House of Commons - Environmental Audit Committee 16 March 2010 While the planning system addresses new homes, existing homes also need to be adapted so they are habitable and comfortable during hotter summers and better protected against the increasing risk of flooding. Local agencies should be enabled to provide integrated retrofitting programmes covering adaptation, water efficiency and energy efficiency. The planning system has a key role in adapting the built environment. New developments should only be approved if they are suited to future climates and do not increase risks to others. Developers should be required to make a greater contribution to improving the general resilience, and thus the sustainability, of communities. Those who are worst affected by climate change, such as those who lose their homes, may need public support. The Government should make clear the limits of public liability: doing so will encourage people to take action to address the risks they face.

8 Recent extreme weather in Britain, such as the flooding in the winter of 2012, has brought into sharp relief, just how important anticipating and managing weather extremes can be. In the case of flooding, the costs of rebuilding can run to hundreds of millions of pounds. Essential public services such as schools and hospitals can be heavily disrupted and business – particularly small, hardworking businesses – can be hit severely. The National Adaption Programme (UK) Making the country resilient to a changing climate July 2013 The Rt Hon Owen Paterson MP Secretary of State for Environment Food and Rural Affairs Economists have estimated that, across Europe, every £1 spent on increasing resilience now could yield £4 in damages avoided. Even when extreme weather hits abroad we feel the effects at home. For example, harvest failures abroad push up food prices here – a worrying prospect for hard-pressed families.

9 Embodied Energy The most sustainable building, is the one which is already built !

10 Traditional house : Vs : Modern houses Resource Account Building materials sand, portland cement, stone, ceramic brick, timber, glass, steel, copper, aluminum, gypsum, plastics, ceramics Building technology heavy processing, power tools Transported to site Building materials stone, timber, reed, straw, mud, lime, sand, pottery Building technology appropriate, light processing, hand tools, All locally sourced Size approximately 45m 2 per person housed Size approximately 15m 2 per person housed

11 The DFP has indicated that the recent changes in relation to energy efficiency will, on average, reduce carbon emissions by 25% from previous standards. This will be achieved by improving fabric thermal efficiency, more efficient boilers, service and heating controls, reduction in the level of uncontrolled air leakage and the consideration of the use of renewable technologies. NB – Meeting the U- value targets alone will not necessarily guarantee compliance. Requires a holistic approach. What is the goal ?

12 Building Regulations – Carbon Outputs ? Pre 2006 Carbon outputs 2006 Carbon outputs 2012 Carbon outputs

13 The New Regulations Calculation of Target CO 2 Emissions Rate in new buildings Introduction of SAP 2009 Introduction of new SEDBUK The Target CO 2 Emission Rate TER is reduced by a straight….. 25% Same as Code level 3 Consequential improvements required to dwellings (only to those over 1,000m2)

14 The New Regulations Element Roof Wall Party WallN/A0.20 Floor0.25 Windows Boiler Efficiency86%88% - 90% Air Permeability Swimming Pool Basins 10 N/A 10(8) 0.25 When insulating – we must ventilate !! - New Part K Greater focus on Thermal bridging

15 Attention to detail Accredited / acceptable details

16 This project is part funded by the EU INTERREG IV Programme.

17 Detailed Energy Audits

18 Air pressure testing

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20 Exemplars

21 Project Progress: Statutory approvals EXEMPLAR Building Control NIEA Planning Part VIII Armagh - Palace Offices Application Submitted N/A Banbridge - Civic Building Approval Obtained N/A Craigavon - Civic Centre Separate from our scheme N/A Down - Killyleagh Community Centre Application Submitted Pending Fisheries Report N/A Louth - Museum Commencement Notification Only N/A Application Submitted Louth - Library Commencement Notification Only N/A Meath - Town Hall / Library Commencement Notification Only N/A Monaghan - Glen Rd Offices Commencement Notification Only N/A North Down - Bangor Town Hall Application Submitted N/A

22 Technologies under trial Draft proofing Cavity wall insulation Roof void insulation Heating duct insulation Heating controls High efficiency boiler – gas Building management system Solar – Photovoltaic generation Solar – Hot water collection LED lighting technology Solar passive cooling Heat pump compression – water Deep cycle technology High efficiency boiler – bio mass

23 Programme and completion Tenders issued: July 2013 Tenders returned: September 2013 Appointment of contractor: October 2013 Completion of works: February 2014 Commencement of monitoring: March 2014

24 Analysis & Visitors

25 Thank You Joseph Birt Co Chairman of the EEMG Project


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