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Middle College: Social Media & Students The University of Iowa Michele Armstrong, Cara DeHekker, & Katie Kidwell.

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Presentation on theme: "Middle College: Social Media & Students The University of Iowa Michele Armstrong, Cara DeHekker, & Katie Kidwell."— Presentation transcript:

1 Middle College: Social Media & Students The University of Iowa Michele Armstrong, Cara DeHekker, & Katie Kidwell

2 Things to Include on the Website: Social Media & Students Cutting edge social media examples: Admissions Student Involvement External Stakeholders Electronic Civility pledge & resources: Students Faculty & Staff

3 Social media, in the beginning, was used as a means for individuals to communicate on personal interest and stay connected with friends, family, and co-horts. Now information is disseminated through these avenues to educate, inform, survey, assemble, and protest everything from classroom curriculum, family updates, to breaking news (Ratliff, 2011). 1 Social Media & Students

4 100% of colleges and universities studied are using some form of social media. 2 94% of first-year students reported spending time on online social networking websites during a typical week. 3 Two studies have found a positive relationship between the use of social networking websites and engagement in higher education. 4

5 Academics Utilizing Skype to video chat with students and speakers Students the University of Nebraska-Lincoln used Skype to have class discussions with students in Moscow, Russia reading the same material Joining Facebook groups to connect as a class and stimulate discussion Social media can be integrated into the classroom & its curriculum in a variety of formats, such as:

6 Student Involvement Getting students engaged in co-curricular activities MIT used YouTube to post a song parody to advertise their annual Elevator Pitch Contest Promoting student engagement during campus activities The University of Iowas first-year immersion program held a Twitter contest, giving away a free iPad to the student who posted the most creative tweet Students learning experiences outside the classroom can be enhanced through social media. Examples include:

7 External Stakeholders Reaching out to prospective students University of Nebraska-Lincolns ClubRed social network connects admitted students through discussion boards, a roommate finder, & more Virtual tours of campus buildings Sharing information with parents University of Iowa created an interactive avatar that can be instant messaged; it answers questions & provides follow-up resources Keeping alumni engaged LinkedIn fosters connections between current students and alumni Social media has the impact to reach beyond the students, faculty, & staff currently on campus. For example:

8 Electronic Civility Pledge: Students The Electronic Civility Pledge for students may include, but is not limited to, the following: Be transparent Be a good representative of Middle College Be respectful Be aware of offensive language & concepts Assume everything posted is permanent Use privacy settings Regularly search yourself Adapted from reference 5.

9 Electronic Civility Pledge: Students First-year Students: Attend an interactive session about social media at orientation & sign the pledge following its completion before registering for classes Returning Students: Attend the same interactive session about social media but with their learning community; will be required to attend the session & sign the pledge before registering for classes

10 Electronic Civility Pledge: Students Complaint Unhappy Complaint to reach out Misinformation Relevant Department Hate Speech Dean of Students Office Instigating Trouble Dean of Students Office Adapted from reference 6. This flowchart can serve as a guide for how to assess situations in which students are in alleged violation of our Electronic Civility Pledge. Consequences could include but are not limited to: reprimand, fines, educational programming, and/or expulsion.

11 Electronic Civility Pledge: Faculty & Staff The Electronic Civility Pledge for faculty & staff may include, but is not limited to, the following: Be transparent Be a good representative of Middle College Be respectful Use disclaimers Be mindful of policies, i.e. copyright laws & FERPA Dont use Middle College logos Remember your audience Be aware of offensive language & concepts Adapted from reference 5.

12 Electronic Civility Pledge: Faculty & Staff Creating a list of resources on & off-campus that faculty & staff can turn to for questions (i.e. ITS, The Chronicles Wired Campus Blog, etc.) Offering Learning & Development Workshops about relevant social media (such as Intro to Facebook, Instant Messaging Using Link, etc.) Providing incentives for creatively and positively integrating social media in and outside classroom To help faculty & staff acclimate to the implementation of social media on & off campus, the following ideas can support our community:

13 References 1. Ratliff, A. F. (2011) Are they listening? Social media on campuses of higher education. Journal of Technology in Student Affairs, Summer Retrieved from 2. University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. (2011). Social Media Adoption Soars as Higher-Ed Experiments and Reevaluates Its Use of New Communications Tool. Retrieved from Ed.pdf. Ed.pdf 3. Higher Education Research Institute. (2007). College freshmen and online social networking sites. HERI Research Brief. Retrieved from 4. Junco, R. (2011). The need for student social media policies. EDUCAUSE, 46(1). Retrieved from olume46/TheNeedforStudentSocialMediaPo/ olume46/TheNeedforStudentSocialMediaPo/ Petroff, M. (2010). Social media policy resource guide for higher ed. doteduGuru. Retrieved from resource-guide-from-simtech10.htmlhttp://doteduguru.com/id6144-social-media-policy- resource-guide-from-simtech10.html 6. DePaul University (2006). Post Response Flowchart. Brand Resources: Social Media Guidelines. Retrieved from wchart.pdf wchart.pdf

14 References 4. Junco, R. (2011). The need for student social media policies. EDUCAUSE, 46(1). Retrieved from USEReviewMagazineVolume46/TheNeedforStudentSo cialMediaPo/ USEReviewMagazineVolume46/TheNeedforStudentSo cialMediaPo/ Petroff, M. (2010). Social media policy resource guide for higher ed. doteduGuru. Retrieved from resource-guide-from-simtech10.html resource-guide-from-simtech10.html 6. DePaul University (2006). Post Response Flowchart. Brand Resources: Social Media Guidelines. Retrieved from MM_Post_Response_Flowchart.pdf MM_Post_Response_Flowchart.pdf


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