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2.Texture. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.Introduction 2.What is texture and what it´s for.What is texture and what it´s for. 3.Types of textures 1.According to.

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Presentation on theme: "2.Texture. TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.Introduction 2.What is texture and what it´s for.What is texture and what it´s for. 3.Types of textures 1.According to."— Presentation transcript:

1 2.Texture

2 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.Introduction 2.What is texture and what it´s for.What is texture and what it´s for. 3.Types of textures 1.According to its volume 1.VisualVisual 2.TactileTactile 2.According to its origin:According to its origin: 1.Natural 2.Artificial 4.Ways of representing textures 1.Through lightThrough light 2.Through collageThrough collage 3.Through the technique of 'rubbingThrough the technique of 'rubbing 4. Through the technique of 'print Through the technique of 'print

3 1. INTRODUCTION Our five senses (sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch) allow us to have sensory experiences. These experiences provide the mind information about the outside world, and the mind organizes this information: the activity in that the mind organizes sensory information is perception.

4 Some elements of art can only be captured by the eye, such as colour, line and plane forms. But others can be explored by sight and touch: this happens to texture. 1. INTRODUCTION

5 What is texture Texture is like the skin of the body, its the outer limit, which separates it from the environment. In short, texture are the properties that the surface of bodies have. For example, we say, the texture of the metal is cold and soft, or the texture of this rock is rough and irregular. 2. WHAT IS TEXTURE AND WHAT IS IT FOR?

6 The basic element to define shapes is the "contour line". But those do not give us complete information about how the shapes and volumes are. For example, a circumference. The circumference can indicate from a plate to a planet. The texture is what allows to distinguish the case of an orange, a basketball ball or a bear. Identify objects through to the texture 2. WHAT IS TEXTURE AND WHAT IS IT FOR?

7 The following series of images is constituted by representations of objects of identical shape and colour, but for something different: its texture, in this case: sandpaper, steel wool, aluminum foil or velvet. 2. WHAT IS TEXTURE AND WHAT IS IT FOR? Identify objects through the texture

8 They are the textures that are perceived through sight and have no relief. They are two- dimensional and what they try, often, is to imitate the textures of real objects to give the work a sense of vivacity and realism. 3. TYPES OF TEXTURES 3.1 According to its volume: Visual and tactile texture VISUAL

9 SOME EXAMPLES OF VISUAL TEXTURES

10 TACTILE They are the textures that are perceived through sight and touch, and also have relief. They are three dimensional and they are often used in art today. 3. TYPES OF TEXTURES 3.1 According to its volume: Visual and tactile texture

11 SOME EXAMPLES OF TACTILE TEXTURES

12 Natural textures are offered by surfaces and bodies of the nature and artificial textures are the objects made by humans. Some examples: 3.2. According to its origin The bark of a tree The surface of the sand A snake skin The bark of a tree The surface of the sand A snake skin The flip of a coin The surface of a tennis ball The texture of a brick wall. The flip of a coin The surface of a tennis ball The texture of a brick wall. 3. TYPES OF TEXTURES

13 5.2 Through collage Textures in modern art Many contemporary artists prefer not to imitate materials in their paintings, if not the picture itself carry materials to be explored by touch. They use various resources: support (which can be rough as burlap and wood, or smooth as metal or linen canvas) and the painting itself (putting it thick and large quantity). 5. WAYS OF REPRESENTING TEXTURES

14 Textures in modern art To make the paint even more dense, they added sand, powdered glass or marble, etc.. Finally, sometimes they stick things to the table: boards, sheets, ropes... all. 5. WAYS OF REPRESENTING TEXTURES 5.2 Through collage

15 Rubbing is an easy technique that allows for passing an object´s texture directly onto paper. Place the paper on the surface of the texture that you propose to reproduce. Rub the pencil colour or wax paper. You can use various colours and overlap rubbed. Not a bad result, right? 5.3 Through 'scrubbing' 5. WAYS OF REPRESENTING TEXTURES

16 With natural textures It´s about painting naturally textured surfaces with tempera and pressing them on paper. If you print a leaf, for example, do not cover the whole surface with tempera: let the nerves stay with no colour to stand out when printed on paper. Leaves, twigs, shells, hands, feet... They´re all good to stamp. 5.4 Through 'stamping ' 5. WAYS OF REPRESENTING TEXTURES

17 With natural textures Try using one color with different shades. For example: blue turquoise, ultramarine, prussian blue: the result is more interesting than if we use different colours. We should overlap prints, to give more richness to the result, and we must avoid leaving big holes in the paper. 5. WAYS OF REPRESENTING TEXTURES 5.4 Through the 'stamping '

18 With artificial textures Metal frames, soles of sports shoes, keys, wool, scissors... anything is good. You will proceed as in past practice, taking care to adjust the viscosity of the tempera to the type of surface you´re going to print. 5. WAYS OF REPRESENTING TEXTURES 5.4 Through 'stamping '

19 With artificial textures For metal grids or nets it´s appropriate that the tempera be diluted in water: so you can immerse the mesh or net in a tub with colored water. 5. WAYS OF REPRESENTING TEXTURES 5.4 Through 'stamping '


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