Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Classroom Management Introductory Workshop Dr. Sandy Washburn Mr. Mike Horvath Ms. Michele Brentano

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Classroom Management Introductory Workshop Dr. Sandy Washburn Mr. Mike Horvath Ms. Michele Brentano"— Presentation transcript:

1 Classroom Management Introductory Workshop Dr. Sandy Washburn Mr. Mike Horvath Ms. Michele Brentano Center on Education and Lifelong Learning Indiana Institute on Disability and Community Indiana University Indiana Regional Workshops

2 The children of today love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority, they show disrespect to adults, and love to talk rather than work or exercise. They contradict their parents, chatter in front of company, gobble up food at the table, and intimidate their teachers.

3 The children of today love luxury. They have bad manners, contempt for authority, they show disrespect to adults, and love to talk rather than work or exercise. They contradict their parents, chatter in front of company, gobble up food at the table, and intimidate their teachers. Socrates attributed to Plato 470 BC–399 BC

4

5 What are the necessary general components of effective classroom management?

6 Reminder to Sandy Review the Agenda

7 A Brief History of Classroom Management Research Systematic study a rather recent phenomenon. Kouinin (1970) 1.Withitness 2.Smoothness and momentum during lesson presentation 3.Clear expectations for students. 4.Variety and challenge in work assigned to students.

8 A Brief History of Classroom Management Research Brophy and Evertson (1976) – Findings support Kounins earlier work – Major finding: Classroom Management is a CRITICAL aspect of effective teaching.

9 A Brief History of Classroom Management Research The Classroom Strategy Study (Brophy 1996;) Brophy & McCaslin,1992). Major Finding: Effective managers employed different types of strategies with different types of students, whereas ineffective managers employed the same strategies regardless of the type of student or the situation.

10 A Brief History of Classroom Management Research Series of 4 studies by the Research and Development Center for Teacher Education in Austin, Texas. (Early 80s) (Evertson, Emmer, Sanford, Clements, and Martin) Major findings: – Support earlier work of Kounin – Early attention to Classroom Management at the beginning of the year was critical to a well-run classroom. – Teachers can improve management techniques through training (study and practice)

11 Classroom Management That Works (Marzano, 2003) Meta analysis Examined effectiveness of 5 components of classroom management – Rules and Procedures – Disciplinary Interventions – Teacher-Student Relationships – Mental Set – Promoting Responsibility

12 Rules and Procedures Rules are location specific behavioral expectations Procedures tell students what to do when, promote student independence and free the teacher to teach, monitor and interact.

13 Disciplinary Interventions Actions taken by the teacher in response to student behavior in order to influence behavior. – Examples from participants

14 Teacher to Student Relationship Clear Purpose and Strong Guidance Effective Instruction High Level of Cooperation Attentive to Student Needs Modeling

15 Heightened Awareness Emotional Objectivity Mental Set

16 Make 3 tic marks-1 for each statement. This element makes the most difference (1 st section ) I am most competent with this element. (2 nd section ) I need to do better with this element. (3 rd section ) Rule and Procedures Disciplinary Interventions Teacher- Student Relationships Mental Set

17 Marzanos Meta-analysis Results for Four Management Factors FACTOR Average Effect Size Number of Subjects Number of Studies Percentile Decrease in Disruptions Rules and Procedures Disciplinary Interventions-.9093, Teacher-Student Relationships Mental Set

18 Marzanos Meta-analysis Results for Four Management Factors FACTOR Average Effect Size Effect Size by Level Rules and Procedures H.S M.S Int Disciplinary Interventions H.S M.S Int Pri Teacher-Student Relationships H.S M.S Int Mental Set-1.294

19 Criteria for Classroom Rules Rules are based on 3-5 broad social principles – Use your SW Expectations Rules describe location-specific behavior What does it look like? Rules are stated positively Involve students in the development. Publicly post the rules.

20 Rules are based on broad social principles/expectations

21 Classroom Rules Responsibility Be on time with all materials. Have your work completed by the deadline. Work on the task that the teacher tells you to work on. Follow procedurescheck the posters when unsure. Respect Use kind and caring words. Use voice levels 0-3 as directed. Take turns and share materials. Safety Keep unfriendly, unwanted and overly friendly hands and feet to self. Walk at all times. Keep all chair legs on floor. Keep prohibited items at home.

22 Criteria for Classroom Rules Rules are based on 3-5 broad social principles – Use your SW Expectations Rules describe location-specific behavior What does it look like? Rules are stated positively Involve students in the development. Publicly post the rules.

23 Evaluate and fix Sample Rules 1.No gum, food or drinks 2.Listen to adults 3.Respect peers and adults with words and actions 4.Use appropriate langauge 5.No electronics

24 Partner Work (15 minutes total-- 8 min to prepare and 7 min to share) 1.Read through a sample set of rules. (handout) 2.Look back at the criteria. 3.Identify rules which meet the criteria-mark somehow. 4.Make improvements to those that dont. 5.Working backwards, what broad principles would you tie these rules to?

25 School-wide Expectations or Guiding Principles RespectResponsibilityIntegrity Classroom Rules General Classroom Rules Keep unfriendly and overly friendly hands and feet to self. Use words and actions that are kind, welcoming, and helpful. Be on time with all materials. Have your work completed by the deadline Use time allotted for this classs work. Take credit for your achievements and accept the outcomes of mistakes Leave prohibited items at home or in locker. Talk about ideas and not people Arrival and Dismissal Greet others Leave area around desk clean for others Walk through doorway before bell ends Have necessary materials before bell ends Leave promptly with all necessary materials when dismissed Bring only allowed items into classroom Follow school dress code Teacher-led Instruction or Independent seatwork Raise hand and wait to be called on or helped. Listen, consider and think about topics of study Be able to paraphrase directions Follow directions Try each problem before asking for help Put forth serious effort and time towards work. Small group work Talk quietly to those in your own group Look at the speaker Be able to paraphrase the speakers words Participate fullytake turns contributing Ask relevant questions of group members Complete action items on time Know and fulfill the tasks of your role

26 Teach Expectations, Rules and Procedures Teach expectations directly. – State the rule in concrete terms – Tell Students Why – Provide students with examples and non-examples of rule-following. – Provide examples via demonstration. Actively involve students in lesson game, role- play, etc., to check for their understanding. Provide opportunities to practice rule following behavior in the natural setting.

27 Prompt or Remind Students of the Rules Provide students with visual prompts (e.g., posters, illustrations, etc). Use pre-corrections, which include: verbal reminders, behavioral rehearsals, or demonstrations of rule-following or socially appropriate behaviors that are presented in or before settings where problem behavior is likely (Colvin, Sugai, Good, Lee, 1997).

28 Monitor Students Behavior in Natural Context Active Supervision (Colvin, Sugai, Good, Lee, 1997) : – Move around – Look around (Scan) – Interact with students Provide reinforcement and specific praise to students who are following rules. Catch errors early and provide specific, instructive feedback to students who are not following rules. (Think about how you would correct an academic error.)

29 Evaluate the Effects of Instruction Collect information – Are rules being followed? – If there are errors, who is making them? where are the errors occurring? when are errors being made? what kind of errors are being made? Summarize information (look for patterns) Use information to make decisions

30 Writing Procedures Procedures tell students what to do when. – Focus in on student behavior Procedures promote student independence – Free teacher to teach, do not rely on your involvement Task Analysis – Step by step – Discrete and observable – Sequential

31 Mental Set-Heightened Awareness Smokey the Bear

32 Working the Crowd- The Inner Loop

33

34 Mental Set-Emotional Objectivity Consequences RE-FRAMING

35 Mental Set-Emotional Objectivity Monitor your own thoughts. Do not hold grudges. Start fresh. – Mentally review and anticipate troublesome student – Try to replace negative expectations with positive ones – Keep those in mind Take Care of Yourself

36 Disciplinary Interventions Balanced Set of: – Rewards – Punishments T chart

37 Types of Disciplinary Interventions Teacher Reaction Group Contingency Home Contingency Direct Cost Tangible Recognition

38 Teacher Reaction Eye contact and proximity Silent signals Private request (Initiating v. terminating) Non-disruptive? Prompt desired behavior Precision command Pre-correction or stimulus cueing Frequent acknowledgment – 4:1 positive to negative interactions Re-teach and practice

39 Teacher Greetings and On- Task Behavior Allday & Pakurar (2007)

40 General Guidelines for Responding to Problem Behavior (see salmon colored handout in folder) What is the reason we should delete these from our commentary? – Why – You – No and Dont – Nagging/Berating/Lecturing

41 Tangible Recognition Refers to any type of concrete recognition or reward offered by teacher. =

42 Types of Differential Reinforcement DR…of lower rates of behavior (DRL) DR…of other behaviors (DRO) DR…of alternative behavior (DRA) DR…of incompatible behavior (DRI)

43 Direct Cost Move seat Briefly remove access to materials Restitution or Overcorrection Token economies Loss of privilege Isolation time out

44 Group Contingency Three types: – All for one (Interdependent Group Contingency) – One for all (Dependent Group Contingency) – To each his/her own (Independent Group Contingency)

45 Home Contingency Most basicInformation shared More detailedparents collaborate to establish home consequences – Requires face to face meeting – Requires record keeping and communication Pop quiz: A)Only for problem behavior B) For problem and positive behavior C) Only for positive behavior D) B or C

46 Disciplinary Interventions Rank these in order of impact/effect from most to least Teacher Reaction Tangible Recognition Direct Cost Group Contingency Home Contingency

47 Disciplinary Interventions Teacher Reaction (-.997) Tangible recognition (-.823) Direct Cost (-.569) Group Contingency (-.981) Home Contingency (-.555)

48 General Response Hierarchy (staff managed) Behavior Continues Direction/Re-teaching State the rule Tell me... Show me... Direction/Re-teaching State the rule Tell me... Show me... Give small consequence that prevents behavior from continuing Warning of Impending Consequence Defusing Strategy Bigger consequence logically related Proximity, eye contact, silent signal Behavior Continues Behavior Stops Acknowledge Student Complies Student Refuses Behavior Continues

49 Disciplinary Interventions--Limits and Record Keeping for Unacceptable Behavior Establish realistic and meaningful limits Involve students in their own record keeping The simpler the better Everyone needs a clean slate Public record keeping is NOT good

50 Establishing a Group Contingency 1.Decide on a behavior that you wish to increase or a problem you wish to decrease If decrease, look back to DR 2.Decide on type of GC 3.Behavioral Criteria (consider baseline) 4.Tracking or record keeping 5.Reward (incremental and final)

51 Group Contingency Three types: – All for one (Interdependent Group Contingency) – One for all (Dependent Group Contingency) – To each his/her own (Independent Group Contingency)

52 Goal Setting/Action Planning 1.Identify 1-2 goals for yourself. 2.For each goal, list 2 specific things that you will do in the next two weeks What, When, With whom, For how long How will you monitor whether you implement the strategy? What will be the outcome measure? How will you decide if it is worth continuing?

53 Continued this Summer Developing Procedures Teacher to Student Relationship Practice activities Self-assessment and action planning Culturally Responsive Management Defusing Power Struggles

54 Teacher to Student Relationship Clear Purpose and Strong Guidance Effective Instruction High Level of Cooperation Attentive and Responsive to Student Needs Modeling

55 Classroom Management is ______ proactive and __________ reactive. Do you remember the 5 elements of effective classroom management?

56 Marzanos Meta-analysis Results for Four Management Factors FACTOR Average Effect Size Number of Subjects Number of Studies Percentile Decrease in Disruptions Rules and Procedures H.S M.S Int Disciplinary Interventions , H.S M.S Int Pri Teacher-Student Relationships H.S M.S Int Mental Set

57 Disciplinary Interventions Teacher Reaction (-.997) Tangible recognition (-.823) Direct Cost (-.569) Group Contingency (-.981) Home Contingency (-.555)


Download ppt "Classroom Management Introductory Workshop Dr. Sandy Washburn Mr. Mike Horvath Ms. Michele Brentano"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google