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The News Story A introductory course in news writing This mini-writing course is intended for students in middle and senior high school English and Journalism.

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Presentation on theme: "The News Story A introductory course in news writing This mini-writing course is intended for students in middle and senior high school English and Journalism."— Presentation transcript:

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2 The News Story A introductory course in news writing This mini-writing course is intended for students in middle and senior high school English and Journalism courses. This lesson was created by Jonathan Klingeman

3 Welcome! Journalism is a skill and practice that takes years to master; however, everyone must start at the beginning. For this mini-course, that is exactly where we will begin! This course will teach you the basic building bocks of news writing that includes writing leads and story structures.

4 Navigation Select this button at any time to move back to the previous slide. Select this button at any time to move back to the main menu. Select this button at any time to move forward to the next slide.

5 Main Menu Writing LeadsStory Structures Lesson 1 Lesson 2 PracticeQuiz Lesson 3 Lesson 4

6 Lesson 1 Writing Leads Whether you're a newspaper journalist, a lawyer, a doctor. You have to organize your thoughts. --Frederick Wiseman

7 Your Story, Your Leads A good journalist always asks So what? or Whats this about? or Whats my point? when considering gathered information First, you must identify the main point of your story before you write it! The lead is what opens any piece of journalism. Other than the headline, the lead is the only chance to catch your readers attention!

8 There are many types of leads; however, we will work with the most popular: a direct news lead. This consists of 1 or 2 sentences in the opening paragraph that contains the most important parts of the story Readers spend only 3 seconds deciding whether to read your story based on your lead! This consists of 1 or 2 sentences in the opening paragraph that contains some of the most important parts of the story (who, what, where, when, why, how) Writing Your Lead

9 Leads Local police captured two juvenile thieves Wednesday after the robbery of Robs Mini-Mart. The following 2 examples are direct news leads that accurately tell the reader the most important information about the story! The Student Council has made plans to donate 100% of all its proceeds from Friday nights social event. The group plans to split the money between two local charities.

10 Lead Wrap Up If you are having trouble, create as many different lead combinations in a short time. The pressure will help you to organize the most important elements! Dont be afraid to toy with leads until you create the best one! This concludes lesson 1 on writing leads. Please select the home button to continue the course!

11 Lesson 2 Story Structures A newspaper should be the maximum of information, and the minimum of comment. --Richard Cobden

12 Organizing Your Story Now with a strong lead, the time has come to develop the rest of your story that includes the most interesting facts! Choosing the correct structure to benefit your readers is critical to the success of your story! There are 3 typical structures you will be using as a journalist: Inverted Pyramid Storytelling Pattern Chronological Order Pattern Also, you might use these patterns together in the same story!

13 Inverted Pyramid LEAD Most Important Details Less important details Least important details Most interesting news stories use this style for many reasons; it benefits: 1.Hurried readers 2.Beginning journalists 3.Headline writers 4.Page layout editors This style is beneficial to many different people because less time will be spent on the parts of the story that arent as important!

14 Storytelling Pattern This narrative form captures a readers interest without being as obvious as the inverted pyramid. After a beginning, middle, and end, the writer includes a clincher or a kicker which gives the reader something to remember without repeating previous information; a circle kicker returns back to the opening paragraph! Lead Clincher Fact

15 Chronological Pattern Though similar to the narrative style, this pattern works very well when a writer is trying to convey critical points of a story! Lead Foreshadowing Chronological Storytelling Climax at End

16 Story Structure Wrap Up Obviously the type of story structure you choose is based a great deal on the content. Keep your readers in mind when organizing your information, drafting your story, and finally revising! This concludes lesson 2 on story structures. Please select the home button to continue the course!

17 Practice Using Leads Read the following lead and think about which news writing tools are used! *STATE COLLEGE--- The State College Area school boards $102 million plan to reconfigure State High could be expected to cost more or less by early next month. Pauling, Dena. "Project Costs Revised." Centre Daily Times 26 Sept. 2006, sec. A: 1+. Who? What? Where? Why? When? How?

18 Practice Using Leads Now, use the following tools to create your own lead. Who? What? Where? Why? When? How? Who: The Senior Class Executive Committee What: Fundraiser Where: South Bend Senior High School When: October December 2006 Why: To raise money for a local childrens charity How: By collecting donations from all grade levels during homeroom

19 Practice Using Leads What did you come up with?? Share your results with a friend or Teacher! Below are possible suggested leads: Who? What? Where? Why? When? How? 1.Students at South Bend recently began taking monetary collections during the second marking period for children in need at the local shelter. Or 2. Beginning in October, The Senior Executive Committee at South Bend will be raising funds for the local children by collecting donations in homerooms. This concludes the practice on how to write leads. Please select the home button to continue the course!

20 Quiz When you are comfortable, click start quiz to begin the examination! You will be tested on the first 2 lessons! Good luck! Start Quiz

21 Question 1 A good journalist always asks ALL of the following questions except: AC DB So What? Whats this about? So what do they expect me to do? Whats my point?

22 Question 2 The average reader spends how long reading a lead when deciding whether to continue reading? AC DB 1 minute 30 seconds 0 seconds 3 seconds

23 Question 3 What is at the top of the inverted pyramid structure? AC DB Least important details Leads Circle Kickers Most important details

24 Try Again! That was a good try, but no. A good journalist should always ask so what in order to find out why a reader/viewer will want to pay attention! Try Again

25 Try Again! That was a good try, but no. A good journalist should always ask whats this about in order to find out who this story will be affecting and why people should pay attention to it! Try Again

26 Try Again! That was a good try, but no. A good journalist should always ask whats my point so that readers/viewers wont be confused about your main idea! Try Again

27 Very Good! That is correct! A good journalist wouldnt ever ask what do they want me to do? As journalists, we should always be looking how to help society! Question 2

28 Try Again! That was a good try, but no. Most readers use a lead when deciding whether to continue. Try Again

29 Try Again! That was a good try, but no. Thats a little too long; in fact, most people can read most of an article in that time! Try Again

30 Try Again! That was a good try, but no. Most readers will have read an entire article in 1 minute. Try Again

31 Very Good! That is correct! A reader only spends about 3 seconds when deciding to continue reading or move to a new story! Make sure your lead is fun, yet meaningful! Question 3

32 Try Again! That was a good try, but no. The most important details are close to the lead, but support the lead rather than build up the information. Try Again

33 Try Again! That was a good try, but no. The least important details should be the fewest and near the bottom! Try Again

34 Try Again! That was a good try, but no. Circle kickers are part of their own story structures that end back at the lead living the reader with a memorable thought! Try Again

35 Very Good! That is correct! The lead is the first and largest part of the inverted pyramid structure followed by the most important details, the less important details, least important details, and etc.

36 Congratulations! Youve done a fantastic job at learning how to use leads and choosing a story structure. Best of luck in the future and keep building your journalism knowledge. If you would like to get some more information about high school journalism, click here to be sent to a great resource!here Click the home button to return to the welcome screen.


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