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Sole Source Procurements What is considered a sole source procurement?

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Presentation on theme: "Sole Source Procurements What is considered a sole source procurement?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Sole Source Procurements What is considered a sole source procurement?

2 Exceptions to the rule Repairs involving hidden damages. Products bought from manufacturer at a much reduced rate. Restricted territory Used equipment sold at auction

3 Sole Source Justification 1.Why is this service or commodity needed? 2. What method(s) were used to determine that a lack of responsible competition exists for this service or commodity? 3. How was it determined that this service, provider or commodity has exclusive processes or properties? 4. Can requirements be modified so that the services or commodity can be competitively bid? If not, why? 5. Are there patent, copyright or proprietary rights which make the required service or commodity unavailable from other sources? 6. What would the agency do if the service or commodity were no longer available? 7. Detail any program considerations, which make the use of a Sole Source critical to the successful completion of the task(s).

4 Sole source policy and check list may be found on our web-site at ocurement/guidelines/Pages/default.as px ocurement/guidelines/Pages/default.as px

5 Sole Source Procurements Sole source policy and check list may be found on our web-site at es/default.aspx es/default.aspx

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7 Sole Source Check List (A) $5, to $25, sole source procurements Steps 1, 2 and 3 (B) $25, to $100, sole source procurements of commodities Steps 1, 2, 3, and 4 (C) $25, to $100, sole source procurements of services Steps 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 (D) $100, or more existing IT (software)procurements (renewals) Steps 2 (coded EL instead of SS), 3, 4, 5, and 6 (E) $100, or more new IT (software)sole source procurements Steps 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 (F) $100, or more IT sole source procurements for software specifically designed or majorly modified for an agency Steps 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 (G) $100, or more sole source procurements for Health Services, Human Services or Educational Services Steps 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 (H) $250, or more sole source procurements for commodities involving services (non IT) Steps 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 9 (I) $250, or more sole source procurements for commodities involving services (IT related that does not fall under F) Steps 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 9

8 Step 1: Develop a written justification per the sole source policy guidelines found at Step 2: Create your purchase order or outline agreement, code it SS (exception: existing IT – see Section D coded EL instead of SS) and attach documentation to the purchase order or outline agreement Step 3: Agency must release the purchase order or outline agreement in AASIS Step 4: Attach a disclosure form to the Purchase Order or Outline Agreement Step 5: Attach an illegal immigrant certification to the Purchase Order or Outline Agreement Step 6: Add the technology access and state architecture clauses to your purchase order or outline agreement Step 7: Attach an approval letter from DF&A Intergovernmental Services to your purchase order or outline agreement. All new purchases of Information Technology products or services with an anticipated cost of $100, or more require DF&A Intergovernmental Services approval. Step 8: These procurements go to Legislative Council for review Step 9: These procurements are reported to the Legislative Council.


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