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Maggie Eisner, May 2011. May 10 th Introduction Exercises – consulting with limited language Interactive presentation – your experiences of limited language.

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Presentation on theme: "Maggie Eisner, May 2011. May 10 th Introduction Exercises – consulting with limited language Interactive presentation – your experiences of limited language."— Presentation transcript:

1 Maggie Eisner, May 2011

2 May 10 th Introduction Exercises – consulting with limited language Interactive presentation – your experiences of limited language consultations and how to improve them DVDs of limited language consultations Briefing for next week May 17 th – practising skills: simulated consultations in facilitated small groups

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4 your experiences of consultations with patients who speak little or no English

5 Non verbal signals – body language, gestures Sign language Paraverbal – loudness, tone, manner of speaking Simplified language (basic English) Drawings and diagrams (prepared, or drawn by either doctor or patient) Leaflets in other languages Internet resources Asylum seekers health portal Translated leaflets Interpreters – telephone or face to face; professional, informal or ad hoc

6 Basic English With interpreter in the room Professional Family member Friend Practice staff member With telephone interpreter …..All need extra time…..

7 Speak clearly, slowly, calmly (dont shout) Simplify English Avoid idioms and colloquialisms Avoid jargon and technical terms Simplify grammar - short, simple sentences Leave gaps for patient to process what youve said and compose reply Simplify consultation structure More closed questions But offer alternatives to check that Yes means Yes (is the pain worse when you sit? Or when you walk?) Consider using pictures using mime (but some gestures arent universal and some may offend) Remember your own expressions and body language Try to check understanding Dont overload (unlike this slide...)

8 Raise the same issues as other 3 way consultations Who is in control? Risk of it becoming 2 way, someone gets excluded (usually the patient but may be the doctor) Always try and look directly at the patient and address your questions to them

9 May be the only option, or may be patients preference May be planned or arranged at short notice Confidentiality issues - with relative or with member of same community Or just embarrassment Interpreter may have poor language skills Interpreter may not understand their role Complex – like having a relative in a same-language consultation Can be hard for the friend or relative too

10 Introductions – who are they? What is their relationship? Are they both comfortable with the situation? Assess translators level of English – may need to use basic English tips with translator Be directive with interpreter Explain what you want to happen and why Ask for direct translation Acknowledge dual role of family member – possibly ask things twice – ask for pts view and then relatives (and they should translate theirs back to patient) Consider offering appt with alternative interpreter

11 May not have had any training May not understand role May not be comfortable with role; may feel pressurised Variable level of language skills Patient may not understand confidentiality

12 General points Very accessible, 100 languages Interpreter may not be in UK Expensive Differences from face-to-face Feels unfamiliar May make sensitive issues harder – or easier Harder to use diagrams Hard to have help while examining Before starting consultation Introduce self to interpreter Check language/dialect is correct Explain your context Be aware of nonverbals (yours and the patients)

13 Doctor Rushed? Jargon or complex English? Complicated or multiple sentences? Rapport with patient or interpreter? Interpreter Language skills Acceptability to patient Inhibiting patient? Not translating fully and/or adding own spin? Patient Lack of trust of interpreter Lack of trust of doctor Embarrassment or taboo subject

14 Styles of greeting and address Formality/informality; politeness Respect for doctors Patients may not expect Patient-centred approach Psychosocial questions Confidentiality


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