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V Glaucoma Implementing NICE guidance 2009 NICE clinical guideline 85.

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Presentation on theme: "V Glaucoma Implementing NICE guidance 2009 NICE clinical guideline 85."— Presentation transcript:

1 v Glaucoma Implementing NICE guidance 2009 NICE clinical guideline 85

2 What this presentation covers Background Scope Key priorities for implementation Costs and savings Discussion Find out more

3 Background Chronic open angle glaucoma (COAG) is a common and potentially blinding condition, and is usually asymptomatic until advanced Ocular hypertension (OHT) is a major risk factor for developing COAG Approximately 10% of UK blindness registrations are attributed to glaucoma By implementing this guideline more people will be prevented from going blind

4 Scope The diagnosis and management of people with COAG and OHT in community, primary care, secondary care outpatient and day treatment services and tertiary care specialist services for people in the following groups: adults (18 and older) with a diagnosis of COAG or OHT people with chronic open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension associated with pseudoexfoliation or pigment dispersion people who have a higher prevalence of glaucoma and may have worse clinical outcomes

5 Key priorities for implementation

6 Diagnosis At diagnosis offer all people who have COAG, who are suspected of having COAG or who have OHT all of the following tests: intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement using Goldmann applanation tonometry (slit lamp mounted) central corneal thickness (CCT) measurement peripheral anterior chamber configuration and depth assessments using gonioscopy visual field measurement using standard automated perimetry (central thresholding test) optic nerve assessment, with dilatation, using stereoscopic slit lamp biomicroscopy with fundus examination

7 Diagnosis Ensure that all of the following are made available at each clinical episode to all healthcare professionals involved in a persons care: records of all previous tests and images relevant to COAG and OHT assessment records of past medical history which could affect drug choice current systemic and topical medication glaucoma medication record drug allergies and intolerances

8 Monitoring Monitor at regular intervals people with OHT or suspected COAG recommended to receive medication (see Treatment for people with OHT or suspected COAG), according to their risk of conversion to COAG (see next slide)

9 Monitoring intervals for people with OHT/suspected COAG recommended to receive medication Clinical assessmentMonitoring intervals (months) IOP at target a Risk of conversion to COAG b Outcome c IOP alone d IOP, optic nerve head and visual field YesLow No change in treatment planNot applicable12 to 24 YesHigh No change in treatment planNot applicable6 to 12 NoLow Review target IOP or change treatment plan1 to 46 to 12 NoHigh Review target IOP or change treatment plan1 to 44 to 6

10 Monitor at regular intervals people with COAG according to their risk of progression to sight loss (see next slide) Monitoring

11 Monitoring intervals for people with COAG Clinical assessmentMonitoring intervals (months) IOP at target a Progression b Outcome c IOP alone d IOP, optic nerve head and visual field YesNo e No change in treatment plan Not applicable6 to 12 Yes Review target IOP and change treatment plan1 to 42 to 6 YesUncertain No change in treatment plan Not applicable2 to 6 NoNo e Review target IOP or change treatment plan1 to 46 to 12 NoYes/uncertain Change treatment plan1 to 22 to 6

12 Treatment for people with OHT or suspected COAG Offer people with OHT or suspected COAG with high IOP treatment based on estimated risk of conversion to COAG using IOP, CCT and age (see next slide)

13 Treatment for people with OHT or suspected COAG CCT More than 590 micrometres 555–590 micrometres Less than 555 micrometresAny Untreated IOP (mmHg)> 21 to 25> 25 to 32> 21 to 25 >25 to 32> 21 to 25> 25 to 32> 32 Age (years) a Any Treat until 60 Treat until 65 Treat until 80Any Treatment No treatment BB b PGA BB: betablocker PGA: prostaglandin analogue

14 Treatment for people with COAG Offer people newly diagnosed with early or moderate COAG, and at risk of significant visual loss in their lifetime, treatment with a prostaglandin analogue Offer surgery with pharmacological augmentation (mitomycin C [MMC] or 5-fluorouracil [5-FU]) as indicated to people with COAG who are at risk of progressing to sight loss despite treatment. Offer them information on the risks and benefits associated with surgery

15 Organisation of care Refer people with suspected optic nerve damage or repeatable visual field defect, or both, to a consultant ophthalmologist for consideration of a definitive diagnosis and formulation of a management plan People with a diagnosis of OHT, suspected COAG or COAG should be monitored and treated by a trained healthcare professional who has all of the following: –a specialist qualification (when not working under the supervision of a consultant ophthalmologist) –relevant experience –ability to detect a change in clinical status

16 Provision of information Offer people the opportunity to discuss their diagnosis, prognosis and treatment, and provide them with relevant information in an accessible format at initial and subsequent visits

17 Costs and savings per 100,000 population Recommendations with significant costsCosts (£ per year) Monitoring and treatment of people with OHT or suspected COAG20,820 Surgery for people who have COAG progression despite treatment3808 Estimated incremental cost of implementation24,628 Potential resource shift as a result of implementation Potential resource shift (£ per year) Demand pressures reduced in hospital eye service from potential resource shift to community–14,661 Estimated cost of shifting services to the community14,661

18 Costs and potential resource shift Recommendations in the following areas may result in additional costs depending on local circumstances: more regular monitoring and treatment of people with OHT or suspected COAG surgery for people who have COAG progression despite treatment as a result of improved sequential data potential resource shift from hospital eye services to community (where appropriate) as a result of increased monitoring of people with OHT and suspected COAG

19 Discussion How effective are local diagnostic services? What changes might we need to make to achieve the monitoring intervals for each patient group? What are the options that local commissioners might consider for delivering this guideline? How are patient information needs currently met?

20 Find out more Visit for: the guideline the quick reference guide Understanding NICE guidance costing report and template/costing statement audit support commissioning guide


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