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A response to multilingual reality: Two-way immersion education in Germany – a model for England? Gabriela Meier, April 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "A response to multilingual reality: Two-way immersion education in Germany – a model for England? Gabriela Meier, April 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 A response to multilingual reality: Two-way immersion education in Germany – a model for England? Gabriela Meier, April 2009

2 Overview 1)Multilingual reality 2)TWI education 3)TWI education in Germany/Berlin 4)TWI education in England? 5)Challenges/limitations

3 School children who speak a language other than the language of instruction at home Berlin : 31% (2006) London: 25% (2008) Sources: SENBJS 2006, Collis 2008

4 Bilingual model (two-way immersion) Theoretical model Classes: 50% majority-language speakers 50% speakers of one migrant language Two teachers one of each language/culture The same curriculum Lessons: 50% in one language 50% in the migrant language Aims: Bilingualism (after 6 to 8 years). Positive cross-cultural attitudes

5 TWI programmes state-run programmes using community languages Examples USA (over 300 programmes) Germany (22 streams)

6 TWI locations in Germany

7 Founded/PlaceName (level)DE with Students 1689 Berlin Collège Français(III) FR Berlin John-F.-Kennedy School (III)EN Saarbrücken Lycée Franco-Allemand (III)FR Freiburg Lycée Franco-Allemand (III)FR Berlin Staatliche Europa-Schule (III) EN, FR, RU, SP, 6000 PT, IT, GR, TU, PL 1993 Wolfsburg Deutsch-Ital. Gesamtschule (III)IT Hagen Deutsch-Ital. Grundschule (I) IT? 1998 Sillenbuch Deutsch-Franz. Grundschule (I) FR? 1999 Hamburg Europa-Schule (II)IT, PT, TU Cologne Deutsch-Ital. Schule (II)IT? 2008 CologneDeutsch-Türkische Schule (I)TU?

8 Founded/PlaceName (level)DE with Students 1689 Berlin Collège Français(III) FR Berlin John-F.-Kennedy School (III)EN Saarbrücken Lycée Franco-Allemand (III)FR Freiburg Lycée Franco-Allemand (III)FR Berlin Staatliche Europa-Schule (III) EN, FR, RU, SP, 6000 PT, IT, GR, TU, PL 1993 Wolfsburg Deutsch-Ital. Gesamtschule (III)IT Hagen Deutsch-Ital. Grundschule (I) IT? 1998 Sillenbuch Deutsch-Franz. Grundschule (I) FR? 1999 Hamburg Europa-Schule (II)IT, PT, TU Cologne Deutsch-Ital. Schule (II)IT? 2008 CologneDeutsch-Türkische Schule (I)TU?

9 8 TWI locations in Berlin

10 Language combinations German – Russian German – French German – English German – Italian German – Spanish School trial has run since 1992 (year 1 to 13) Nearly 6000 students currently in bilingual streams University access in Germany, Greece, France, Italy German – Greek German – Turkish German – Portuguese German - Polish Staatliche Europa-Schule Berlin (SESB)

11 TWI education in London? Languages spoken by children in London schools Bengali & Silheti40,400Greek6,300 Panjabi29,800Akan (Ahanti) 6,000 Gujerati28,600Portuguese6,000 Hindi/Urdu26,000French5,600 Turkish15,600Spanish5,500 Arabic11,000Tamil3,700 Yorubu (Nigeria)10,400Farsi2.500 Somali 8,300Italian2,500 Cantonese 6,900Vietnamese2,400 Source: Baker, P. and Eversely, J. (2000) Multilingual Capital, London: Battlebridge

12 TWI is possible in England Wix primary school (started 2006) Wandsworth, London English-French (28 pupils per year) Collaboration between local primary and Lycée Charles de Gaulle

13 Reason 1: Improve motivation for language learning high-level proficiency in two languages positive attitude towards language learning/bilingualism greater language awareness and confidence builds on students or local language expertise regular exposure to and opportunities to use the language language relevant in everyday life Addresses: Increasing lack of language skills and low take-up of languages at secondary level and beyond

14 Reason 1: Improve motivation for language learning high-level proficiency in two languages positive attitude towards language learning/bilingualism greater language awareness and confidence builds on students or local language expertise regular exposure to and opportunities to use the language language relevant in everyday life Addresses: Increasing lack of language skills and low take-up of languages at secondary level and beyond

15 Reason 2: Increase status of locally spoken languages languages studied by majority and minority language speakers elevating a migrant language to a language of instruction signal to parents and children that language is important providing role models (teachers) Addresses: Low status of some migrant languages and their speakers

16 Reason 3: Potential for community cohesion reduce ethnic segregation in schools more positive cross-cultural attitudes potential for multiple identity development positive class climate/class cohesion greater conflict resolution skills better home-school communication potential two-way integration Addresses: Duty to promote community cohesion in schools (DCFS, 2007)

17 Reason 3: Potential for community cohesion reduce ethnic segregation in schools more positive cross-cultural attitudes potential for multiple identity development positive class climate/class cohesion greater conflict resolution skills better home-school communication potential two-way integration Addresses: Duty to promote community cohesion in schools (DCFS, 2007)

18 Reason 4: Student-centred approach/individual development builds on students skills/develops linguistic potential using childrens home life as a knowledge resource have high expectations of all students represent the students cultures in school accept children for who they are Addresses: Every Child Matters Strategy: Change for children in schools (DfES, 2005)

19 Implementation: challenges Find appropriate site Interested parents Ideally bilingual/multilingual neighbourhood Reasonably liberal/open-minded population Sympathetic authorities Sympathetic host school Integrate into school system integrate into school: inform all staff/teachers/governors Start with two classes Integrate into curriculum Integrate with FE/HE provisions (long term) Local integration cooperate with parents, community organisations, embassies

20 Paradigm Shift TWI education would challenge how we view languages of the wider world how we view speakers of those languages our understanding of social integration attitudes of native English speakers to language study Freeman (1998) Bilingual education and social change, Clevedon, Multilingual Matters Two-way immersion education = two-way integration

21 Further research Long-term effects of TWI education (economic, societal, political) Feasibility study taking into account economic, linguistic, cultural, political, popular and educational factors.

22 Contact: Gabriela Meier, University of Exeter, Department of Politics, Amory Building, Exeter EX4 4RJ


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