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Oregon Wildlife Movement Data CETAS Meeting June 16, 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "Oregon Wildlife Movement Data CETAS Meeting June 16, 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 Oregon Wildlife Movement Data CETAS Meeting June 16, 2009

2 Land use changes Invasive species Changes in fire, flood regimes Water quality and quantity Institutional barriers to voluntary conservation Barriers to fish and wildlife movement Six Key Conservation Issues

3 Oregon Wildlife Movement Strategy Provide a framework for cooperation Promote wildlife movement and habitat permeability Reduce the social, economic and environmental impacts of transportation and wildlife conflicts

4 Oregon Wildlife Movement Strategy ODFW data collection

5 Oregon Wildlife Movement Strategy Wildlife Linkages Best place to provide for animal movement needs, with an emphasis on areas that cross roads ODFW convened four workshops in 2007 –Review session at The Wildlife Society annual meeting –Bend, Roseburg, La Grande & Alsea Linkage areas

6 Oregon Wildlife Movement Strategy ODFW linkage workshops Breakout sessions worked with existing maps and with GISBreakout sessions worked with existing maps and with GIS Product: Identified linkage areas that cross transportation corridors throughout the stateProduct: Identified linkage areas that cross transportation corridors throughout the state

7 Linkages Data Forms 1. What type of linkage is provided for the focal species: Landscape – level; migratory; population (provides for genetic interchange); historic (missing linkage); etc. 2. What are the most significant barriers to animal movement within the linkage area: Development; roadways; natural barriers; etc. 3. Score the value of this linkage for this focal species: 1 (low value) (critical value) 4. Score the overall threat to connectivity: 1 (no threat/secure) (severe threat/loss imminent) 5. What specific opportunities are available to restore, establish or protect the linkage (i.e., known local support for restoration, land management, or acquisition)? 6. What existing features facilitate animal movement through the linkage area: Waterway; under bridge; continual habitat; etc.

8 Linkages map/data export * exaggerated for visual aid WILDLIFE LINKAGES

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10 Oregon Wildlife Movement Strategy ODOT data collection

11 ODOT Wildlife Collision Hot Spot Analysis Conducted by Mason, Bruce and Girard, Inc. Existing carcass pick-up records Statewide, analytical approach Mapped high frequency wildlife-vehicle collision zones 12 years of data; deer/elk & 0.5 mi. only US Hwy

12 Data Preparation Original # Records 31,595 (100%) Step 1 - Data Processing Narrowing Acceptable Parameters25,216 (80%) –Cut out records older than 1995, duplicate records, non deer/elk, low precision (> 0.5 mi) Tabular Information Problems 21,335 (68%) –Not enough information in recorded data Step 2 - Linkage to GIS GIS Mapping Problems17,824 (56%) * Route ODOT Highway number * Final number of "good" records used in data analysis

13 Data Analysis Nearest Neighbor Analysis Z-statistic to determine statistical significance of dispersion. Monte Carlo simulations (100 random data sets). Modified for linear nature of data (highway system)Z-statistic to determine statistical significance of dispersion. Monte Carlo simulations (100 random data sets). Modified for linear nature of data (highway system) Results: NNI < 1.0 (indicates clustering) Neither test identifies where the clusters occur Ripleys K-Statistic K-statistic (Levine, 2000), modified for linear dataK-statistic (Levine, 2000), modified for linear data Gives indication of the scales at which the clusters occurGives indication of the scales at which the clusters occur Results: Highly significant at all scalesResults: Highly significant at all scales

14 Kernel Density Evaluation Produces an estimate of risk for each point –Relative density of points –Relative proximity of points Shows where clusters occur Subjective classification –Method of categorizing –Ranking or # bins

15 * exaggerated for visual aid Wildlife Collision Hot Spots

16 Oregon Wildlife Movement Strategy Prioritization

17 Integrate and set priorities By WMS working group Workshop data: –High value for focal species –High Threat value Land Ownership In a Conservation Opportunity Area In an ODOT Roadkill hotspot

18 Result: linkages dataset with current priorities for Oregon

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20 Next Steps

21 Crossing Improvements Hot Spot & Linkage data; precursor to more focused studies –Condition assessment, road kill surveys, wildlife monitoring, etc. Typically not regulated Competitive funding: –FHWA Enhancement program (Category 11) –Oregon Transportation Plan (Goal 4.1.1) –Safety Funding: SAFETEA-LU Section 148 Must take into account long-term maintenance, monitoring Partnerships very important

22 Next Steps: Implementation ODFW Actions –Regional coordination (District Wildlife and Fish bios) –Western Governors Initiative –Challenges Desire for web-based tool Monitoring & information needs Coordinate with Fish Passage Program ODFW/ODOT Liaison Program –Provide a resource to assist with project scoping –Develop site and species specific passage actions –Monitoring WMS –Training/outreach –Project development

23 For More Information on the Oregon Wildlife Movement Strategy Audrey Hatch, 541 – 757 – 4263 x 242; Mindy Trask, (503)

24 Thanks to our photographers Stephen Anderson Jason Blazar Bruce Campbell Claire Fiegener Lori Hennings Bob Hooten Brome McCreary Michael Murphy Bruce Newhouse Bruce Taylor Jennifer Thompson USFWS


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