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Alaska English/Language Arts Standards Understanding the Shifts Karen Melin Literacy Content Specialist Alaska Department of Education & Early Development.

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Presentation on theme: "Alaska English/Language Arts Standards Understanding the Shifts Karen Melin Literacy Content Specialist Alaska Department of Education & Early Development."— Presentation transcript:

1 Alaska English/Language Arts Standards Understanding the Shifts Karen Melin Literacy Content Specialist Alaska Department of Education & Early Development 1

2 Goals For This Session Navigate Structure of Alaska English/Language Arts Standards Identify shifts in the Alaska ELA Standards Peek at the future 2

3 Intentional Design Limitations What the Alaska Standards do not define: How teachers should teach All that can or should be taught The nature of advanced work beyond the core The interventions needed for students well below grade level The full range of support for English language learners and students with special needs Everything needed to be college and career ready 3

4 College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading The concept of anchor standards: Created before the K–12 standards Present a big picture or overarching idea Represent overall outcomes Reflect research about postsecondary education programs and what employers identified as critical skills 4

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9 Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects grades 6-12 READING WRITING 10 Anchor Standards Arranged in 4 strands Key Ideas and Details Craft and Structure Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10 Anchor Standards Arranged in 4 Strands Text Types and Purpose Production and Distribution of Writing Research to Build and Present Knowledge Range of Writing Grade Specific Standard Grade Specific Standards Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

10 Content Area 10

11 Content Area 11

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14 Turn and Talk Tell a partner one thing you can add to your knowledge or understanding of the Alaska English/Language Arts Standards. 14

15 What Has Not Shifted in English Language Arts 1.Foundational Skills in the early Grades 2.The instruction of the basic reading components is still an expectation 3.The standards for these skill are mastered by grade 5. 15

16 General Shifts in Instruction 1.Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and information texts in addition to literature 2. Reading and writing grounded in evidence from the text 3. Regular practice with complex text and its academic vocabulary 16

17 17 Shift #1: Building Knowledge Through Content-Rich Nonfiction

18 The Why: Shift One Much of our knowledge base comes from informational text Informational text makes up the vast majority (80 percent) of the required reading in college and the workplace Informational text is harder for students to comprehend than narrative text Yet, students are asked to read very little informational text (7 to 15 percent) in the elementary grades and in middle school 18

19 What is Informational Text in ELA? Literary nonfiction. For purposes of Alaska ELA Standards, Biographies, memoirs, speeches, opinion pieces Essays about art, literature, journalism, etc. Historical, scientific, technical, or economic accounts written for a broad audience Emphasis is on text structure other than narrative Historical text (Gettysburg Address, Letters from the Birmingham Jail, or The Preamble and First Amendment of the United States Constitution) 19

20 Balance of Information and Literary Texts in K-5 _Informational_and_Literary_Texts_in_K_5 20

21 21 Shift #2: Reading and Writing grounded in Evidence From Text

22 The Why: Shift Two Most college and workplace writing requires evidence The ability to cite evidence differentiates strong from weak student performance on NAEP Evidence is a major emphasis of the ELA standards: Reading standard 1, writing standard 9, and speaking and listening standards 2, 3, and 4, all focus on gathering, evaluating, and presenting evidence from text. Approximately 80 percent of Reading Standard in each grade expect text dependent analysis 22

23 In Casey at the Bat, Casey strikes out. Describe a time when you failed at something. In Letter From Birmingham Jail, Dr. King discusses nonviolent protest. Discuss, in writing, a time when you wanted to fight against something that you felt was unfair. In The Gettysburg Address Abraham Lincoln says the nation is dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Why is equality an important value to promote? What makes Caseys experiences at bat humorous? What can you infer from Kings letter about the letter that he received? The Gettysburg Address mentions the year According to Lincolns speech, why is this year significant to the events described in the speech? Not Text Dependent Text Dependent 23

24 Good Text-Dependent Questions Linger over specific phrases and sentences to ensure careful comprehension of the text Help students see something worthwhile that they would not have seen on a more cursory reading Is a question that can only be answered by referring explicitly back to the text being read. 24

25 Reading Strategies and Text-Dependent Questions Text-dependent questions generally call on students to employ reading strategies. Strategies are no longer taught in isolation. The text itselfand a readers need to comprehend itshould determine what strategies are activated, not the other way around. 25

26 Reading strategies should support the comprehension of texts and focus on building knowledge and insight. Close reading and the gathering of knowledge from specific texts should be at the heart of classroom activities and not be consigned to the margins of instructional materials. Reading Strategies and Text-Dependent Questions 26

27 Reading Strategies and Text-Dependent Questions Reading strategies should work in the service of reading comprehension (rather than being an end unto themselves) and should assist students in building knowledge and insight from specific texts. To be effective, instruction on specific reading techniques should occur when those techniques will illuminate specific aspects of a text. 27

28 Video https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/analyzing-text- lesson https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/analyzing-text- lesson 28

29 Turn and Talk Identify any Alaska English/Language Arts Standards that were present in this lesson. How did Mr. Brewer accomplish the lesson objective of getting the students to discuss and analyze difficult informational text? Could the approaches that Ms. Brewer uses be used in other content areas? If so, what adjustments might need to be made? 29

30 Shift #3: Regular Practice With Complex Text and Its Academic Vocabulary 30

31 The Why: Shift Three The gap between the complexity of college and high school text is huge. What students can read, in terms of complexity, is the greatest predictor of success in college (ACT study). Too many students are reading at a low level. (Less than 50 percent of graduates can read sufficiently complex text to succeed at the college level.) The Alaska ELA Standards focus on building the general academic vocabulary so critical to comprehension. 31

32 Text complexity is defined by w of Text Complexity 32

33 Text complexity is defined by w of Text Complexity Quantitative 1.Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity often best measured by computer software. 33

34 Text complexity is defined by w of Text Complexity Qualitative 2.Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands often best measured by an attentive human reader. Quantitative 1.Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity often best measured by computer software. 34

35 Text complexity is defined by w of Text Complexity Qualitative 2.Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands often best measured by an attentive human reader. Quantitative 1.Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity often best measured by computer software. Reader and Task 3.Reader and Task considerations – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, and complexity generated by tasks assigned often best made by educators employing their professional judgment. 35

36 Emphasis on Complex Text uhmwsD6Y&feature=player_detailpage 36

37 Features of Complex Text Subtle and/or frequent transitions Multiple and/or subtle themes and purposes Density of information Unfamiliar settings, topics, or events Lack of repetition, overlap, or similarity in words and sentences Complex sentences Uncommon vocabulary Lack of words, sentences, or paragraphs that review or pull things together for the student Longer paragraphs Any text structure that is less narrative and/or mixes structures 37

38 Vocabulary Vocabulary is one of two features that is most predictive of student future difficulty in reading. (Chall 1996, Stanovich 1986, Nelson et al 2012) Academic vocabulary is the vocabulary critical to understanding the concepts of the content taught in schools. Vocabulary is difficult to catch up 38

39 Alaska Standards Timeline June 2012 Adoption by State board SY Awareness Campaign Transition Tools Field test item types SY All grades and content taught to new standards Spring 15 new assessment in place SY Alignment of curriculum to new standards Implementation of new standards 39

40 Spring 2015 New Alaska Assessments 40

41 Goals Check Navigate Structure of Alaska English/Language Arts Standards Identify shifts in the Alaska ELA Standards 41

42 Contact Us! Karen Melin, Language Arts Content Specialist Deborah Riddle, Mathematics Content Specialist Bjorn Wolter, Science Content Specialist Elizabeth Davis, Assessment Administrator


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